Review: Apple's early 2010 MacBook Pros

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Comments

  • str1f3str1f3 Posts: 573member
    I wonder what happens when the 13" MBP moves to Arrandale. They can't stay with C2Ds forever and Intel's GMA just can't do the job.
  • isaidsoisaidso Posts: 750member
    If one is comparing laptops, these are the three most important things.

    Anybody making an argument for a Dell or whatever other laptop, over an Mac portable, must account for these three elements. If not; you're just a laptop "poser".



    Weight

    Battery life

    Build quality
  • richlrichl Posts: 2,213member
    Anyone know how to enable HDMI audio? I can get it to display fine but the audio is still coming out of my new 15" MBP.



    It's listed under Sound preferences but the volume bar and mute control are greyed out.
  • john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,581member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    It's a bummer the 13 inch MacBook Pro takes no advantage of the Arrandale features with its Core 2 Duo design. Either Apple was trying to make sure its entry level professional model could still sneak in under $1200, or it perhaps thought that using the Core i3 or i5 might result in constrained supplies for its popular entry level model due to the newness of the Arrandale components.



    Pay attention, Daniel. Ars documented the fact that there isn't room enough in the 13" MBP to add the Arrandale hardware without relying on the sucktastic Intel HD graphics. For the marginal (nominal, really) improvement of an i3 you'd lose the significantly faster 320M graphics (resulting in a slower overall laptop). Or they would have to build a bigger case.



    FWIW, I think there is plenty of margin in the 13" MBPs; I doubt the $1200 pricepoint would be in jeopardy if they went the the i3 or added discrete graphics...
  • solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post


    I wonder what happens when the 13" MBP moves to Arrandale. They can't stay with C2Ds forever and Intel's GMA just can't do the job.



    My wish is that they remove the ODD. I don't see any other way around it at this time. They can't go with Intel HD and no dGPU, but there is no room for a dGPU, and I don't they can do another do another C2D speed bump for more than more round, but I don't think they'll do that with Sandy Bridge offering such excellent power savings.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by isaidso View Post


    If one is comparing laptops, these are the three most important things.

    Anybody making an argument for a Dell or whatever other laptop, over an Mac portable, must account for these three elements. If not; you're just a laptop "poser".



    Weight

    Battery life

    Build quality



    It's always a big clunky Dell or HP to a MBP. It's never that same, big clunky Dell or HP to the premium Dell or HP offerings that best match a MBP.
  • asciiascii Posts: 5,363member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    The MacBook still has the 9400M but the 13" MBP has the Nvidia 320M.



    Yup. And my reading of the sentence is it is saying the 13" Pro still has the 9400M.
  • solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JoeDyndale View Post


    I compared the Dell XPS 16 with the i7 15" MBP to see what might justify the $900 price difference (I used the Norwegian Dell and Apple stores online for price comparisons and converted it to USD).



    The Dell has a slightly better screen, or rather, a higher resolution screen. It also has faster RAM. It also has twice as much graphics RAM (1GB).



    However... The MBP's CPU is almost 1GHz faster. The MBP also has much longer battery life and the stronger unibody build. The MBP also has small things like the multi-touch trackpad going for it.



    So as far as value for money goes, it's almost a tie - the MBP being only very slightly more expensive. And this is absulutely worth it in my book, because of the much better design and OS X.



    Here's Intel's price list if you want to compare the cost differences between the CPU models.
  • solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RichL View Post


    Anyone know how to enable HDMI audio? I can get it to display fine but the audio is still coming out of my new 15" MBP.



    It's listed under Sound preferences but the volume bar and mute control are greyed out.



    Off the top of my head I'd say your cable wasn't built to support Audio from mDP to HDMI since that wasn't originally an option...
  • jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JoeDyndale View Post


    I compared the Dell XPS 16 with the i7 15" MBP to see what might justify the $900 price difference (I used the Norwegian Dell and Apple stores online for price comparisons and converted it to USD).



    The Dell has a slightly better screen, or rather, a higher resolution screen. It also has faster RAM. It also has twice as much graphics RAM (1GB).



    However... The MBP's CPU is almost 1GHz faster. The MBP also has much longer battery life and the stronger unibody build. The MBP also has small things like the multi-touch trackpad going for it.



    So as far as value for money goes, it's almost a tie - the MBP being only very slightly more expensive. And this is absulutely worth it in my book, because of the much better design and OS X.



    The difference is that you're comparing two systems that are not equal in any way. For example, state that the Dell has a better screen, but then indicate that its resolution is better. The fact is that while the resolution is (marginally) higher, the quality of the screen is dramatically worse on the Dell. Compare the screens side by side. Since I spend a lot of tie looking at a laptop screen, that's important.



    Then the other factors you cited - like 3 times the battery life, faster CPU, and better quality case (again, important for a laptop). Then consider things like customer satisfaction, reliability and support. Apple is always at or near the top and Dell is at the bottom.



    Your comparison is like saying a Chevy Malibu sedan is a better car than a Ferrari because the Chevy seats more passengers and has more windows to roll down.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    My wish is that they remove the ODD.



    I don't think very many people would be happy with that. For the vast majority of users, the benefit of an i3 in the 13" would be marginal compared to the loss of functionality if the ODD were removed.
  • veblenveblen Posts: 201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by isaidso View Post


    If one is comparing laptops, these are the three most important things.

    Anybody making an argument for a Dell or whatever other laptop, over an Mac portable, must account for these three elements. If not; you're just a laptop "poser".



    Weight

    Battery life

    Build quality



    I agree 100%.
  • eseminarioeseminario Posts: 1member
    Hello can somebody tell me how can I achieve the photo effect used in last page of this article? Where appears 3 photos...this effect is used most of time by apple too...

    Thank you
  • applegreenapplegreen Posts: 421member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post


    I wonder what happens when the 13" MBP moves to Arrandale. They can't stay with C2Ds forever and Intel's GMA just can't do the job.



    I think Apple will try to convince Intel to let Nvidia make chipsets for the Core i series of microprocessors. I see Apple's use of Intel HD integrated graphics as a temporary solution. Apple's discussions with AMD is a way to signal to Intel that Apple is not happy with the current Intel/Nvidia licensing situation.
  • joedyndalejoedyndale Posts: 30member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    The difference is that you're comparing two systems that are not equal in any way. For example, state that the Dell has a better screen, but then indicate that its resolution is better. The fact is that while the resolution is (marginally) higher, the quality of the screen is dramatically worse on the Dell. Compare the screens side by side. Since I spend a lot of tie looking at a laptop screen, that's important.



    Then the other factors you cited - like 3 times the battery life, faster CPU, and better quality case (again, important for a laptop). Then consider things like customer satisfaction, reliability and support. Apple is always at or near the top and Dell is at the bottom.



    Your comparison is like saying a Chevy Malibu sedan is a better car than a Ferrari because the Chevy seats more passengers and has more windows to roll down.





    I agree whole-heartedly. I was just trying to point out some of the major differences between the two to those who compared the new MBP to the Dell XPS 16 above my initial comment. What I said about the screen is basically what you said. I was just writing as I was thinking and didn't bother to go back and edit, so I said "better, or rather, higher resolution"



    I couldn't really say anything about the customer service thing as I don't have any experience with either manufacturers in that regard, and I didn't feel like trying to search for any documentation as to which might have a better track record in this area.



    I'm a huge Apple fan, and can't see myself switching to anything else at least in the next 10 years.
  • wonderwonder Posts: 229member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post




    The MacBook Pros gain an stronger edge in both processing and graphics performance over the entry level white MacBook and compact MacBook Air, thanks largely to the NVIDIA GeForce 320M in the 13 inch MacBook Pro and the NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M in the 15 and 17 inch models.



    While the MacBook Pro's CPUs and GPUs have been rejiggered, their unibody contraction and other features are largely unchanged: rigid aluminum cases with strong edges; good keyboard feel with backlit typing; a big, glass trackpad that supports gestures and secondary clicks; all the same ports as the previous models; and the same high quality displays with wide viewing angles and a glossy screen.



    As with the previous generation of MacBook Pros (review), the 17 inch model uniquely features three USB ports (rather than two on the 15 inch model) and its ExpressCard/34 slot (rather than just an SD Card slot on other MacBook models.) If you want an SD Card slot reader, you can get one for the 17" model's ExpressCard slot for about $20. The card slot comes in handy if you want to use 3G WWAN card or have some specialized need for an interface like eSATA or additional Firewire ports, although Apple's says its surveys show that only 10% of users ever actually use the ExpressCard slot. If you're in that minority of users who need it, the 17 inch model is the only way to get it on a MacBook.



    Who proof reads these reviews?



    The above should read as follows :-



    The MacBook Pros gain a stronger edge in both processing and graphics performance over the entry level white MacBook and compact MacBook Air, thanks largely to the NVIDIA GeForce 320M in the 13 inch MacBook Pro and the NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M in the 15 and 17 inch models.



    While the MacBook Pro's CPUs and GPUs have been rejiggered, their unibody construction and other features are largely unchanged: rigid aluminum cases with strong edges; good keyboard feel with backlit typing; a big, glass trackpad that supports gestures and secondary clicks; all the same ports as the previous models; and the same high quality displays with wide viewing angles and a glossy screen.



    As with the previous generation of MacBook Pros (review), the 17 inch model uniquely features three USB ports (rather than two on the 15 inch model) and its ExpressCard/34 slot (rather than just an SD Card slot on other MacBook models.) If you want an SD Card slot reader, you can get one for the 17" model's ExpressCard slot for about $20. The card slot comes in handy if you want to use 3G WWAN card or have some specialized need for an interface like eSATA or additional Firewire ports, although Apple says its surveys show that only 10% of users ever actually use the ExpressCard slot. If you're in that minority of users who need it, the 17 inch model is the only way to get it on a MacBook.
  • matrix07matrix07 Posts: 1,993member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by John.B View Post


    But the one "Con" is that it runs Windows, not OSX...



    Windows 7 is ok. I think the major "con" for PC notebook is a lack of multi-touch pad. That's alone worth a lot more than 4 cores vs 2 cores or Blu-Ray drive or...
  • wonderwonder Posts: 229member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MonkeyFightingSnake View Post


    I have to agree with this. I had to purchase a new laptop this month, and a similarly equipped Dell Studio 16 with i7 and a better screen was $1000 less than the macbook....I was really disappointed. I couldn't justify that price difference.



    The buy the PC, simple!
  • bearboykahlobearboykahlo Posts: 3member
    I bought the a new 17" MacBook and I'm less than impressed with the new graphics switching. Many other are having the same problem. Unless Apple does something I can definitely see a lawsuit coming on due to deceptive advertising of battery life. I've never gotten above 3-4 hours at best even just doing casual browsing.



    There are MANY small, tiny programs that seem to switch to use the discreet graphics. Its just about impossible to use any website without it switching on as well (even gmail). Small menubar programs seem to trigger discreet graphics. There is NO current way to force the laptop to use integrated graphics, you can only choose to force discreet graphics.



    Here some more info on the topic:

    http://discussions.apple.com/thread....readID=2407482

    http://discussions.apple.com/thread....readID=2414239



    Some apps that force discreet graphics:

    Cloud

    ShoveBox

    Tweetie

    HyperSpaces

    Skype

    iWeb

    iMovie

    GarageBand

    Parallels 5 Desktop

    Microsoft Office 2004

    Microsoft Office AutoUpdate daemon

    RapidWeaver

    PathFinder

    Mathematica

    Warp

    Droplr

    1Password

    Clips

    NetNewsWire

    Koolclip

    atMonitor

    Delicious Library

    Fresh

    Little Snapper

    OmmWriter

    Picturesque

    Pixelmator

    RipIt

    Rucksack

    Screen Sharing

    Scribbles

    Skim (after searching)

    The Hit List

    Times

    VMWare Fusion 3 (gfx acceleration disabled)
  • steveminnesteveminne Posts: 5member
    First, I think the article referred to SSDs (Solid State Drives) as SDDs.

    Second, Apple does not offer a 7200rpm HDD drive option for the MacBook Pro 13". That alone should call the "Pro" moniker into question.
  • solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bearboykahlo View Post


    I bought the a new 17" MacBook and I'm less than impressed with the new graphics switching. Many other are having the same problem. Unless Apple does something I can definitely see a lawsuit coming on due to deceptive advertising of battery life. I've never gotten above 3-4 hours at best even just doing casual browsing.



    There are MANY small, tiny programs that seem to switch to use the discreet graphics. Its just about impossible to use any website without it switching on as well (even gmail). Small menubar programs seem to trigger discreet graphics. There is NO current way to force the laptop to use integrated graphics, you can only choose to force discreet graphics.



    Here some more info on the topic:

    http://discussions.apple.com/thread....readID=2407482

    http://discussions.apple.com/thread....readID=2414239



    Some apps that force discreet graphics:

    [...]



    It's quite a shame. Apple's solution has a great benefit over Nvidia's Optimus as it doesn't have the limited and unintelligent requirement of making a decision based on what processes are running. It should be able to monitor the load independent of what apps are open. Hopefully they get that worked out.



    I spent about an hour in and Apple Store on two occasions ? before and after the graphics update ? doing tests and looking for hidden switch to disable the dGPU completely in favour of the IGP for best power savings, at least when the battery in use. Nothing! With Apple as obsessed with power and duration per charge (as they should be) you'd think this would have the default feature.



    They also need to add and app or update System Profiler so that the data is dynamic. You can see which graphics option is in use, at any one time but hitting Command-R to refresh gets annoying when done several hundred times. The silver lining: At least System Profiler doesn't cause the dGPU to run.
  • john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,581member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wonder View Post


    Who proof reads these reviews?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SteveMinne View Post


    First, I think the article referred to SSDs (Solid State Drives) as SDDs.



    Definitely not one of Prince's, er, I mean Daniel's best efforts...
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