Microsoft to follow Apple's Lion lead with digital delivery of Windows 8

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  • tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 40,293member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    1.44 million files. That is some serious bloat.



    How many does Lion have?



    More. Seriously.
  • mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Windows 7 and Vista: Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise, Ultimate



    Oh, sorry, six. You probably wouldn't let me count the "N" edition. What about the 32-bit and 64-bit versions? I'd count those. So twelve.





    Plus isn't there full versions and upgrade versions of each? Plus server versions.
  • jmgregory1jmgregory1 Posts: 384member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Plus isn't there full versions and upgrade versions of each?



    Yes - each with its own set of conditions - which is why people end up buying the wrong thing and having to try to swap for what they hope is the right upgrade/new system.



    Again, it's made for a group of people who don't want change or only want a part-change and MS is willing to try to accommodate them all. Their model is just so old-school, but given they have to build their system to operate on such a wide and wildly different group of computers from different computer manufacturers, it's no wonder they've done things the way they have.
  • fecklesstechguyfecklesstechguy Posts: 501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post


    There are never more than three options of Windows to buy.



    There's Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional and Ultimate (ignoring of course Enterprise and Server) so yeah that's ummmm 1,2,3,4,5 versions - for Windows 7.



    We are obviously going to ignore Windows Mobile, Win Phone 7, Windows Home Server, Windows XP Embedded, Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs, and Windows Embedded CE 6.0, because, well because we can. And probably should.



    And we are going to ignore the roughly 30% of the current market that is still running XP desktop. Again, because we can. And probably should.



    Never. You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.



  • sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,202member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post


    That's stretching the truth a bit too thin.



    Practically speaking, there are only two versions of Windows worth caring about, Home Premium and Professional, and 99% of people only need Home Premium. If your computer came with Windows 7 Professional, you can only upgrade to Windows 8 Professional so you don't loose features.



    Translation:



    1. There are only two versions of windows...worth caring about.

    2. OK, technically there are like 5 more. But ignore those. Unless you're a small business, medium business, or home video editor...or female. Then proceed to step 3.

    3. If your computer came with one of the two versions that most people care about, you can upgrade to one of the NEW versions that only some people care about.

    4. If you are not part of the 99%, you can get a free upgrade to Windows 8, unless your computer came with Windows 7 or you're an idiot still running Vista for XP

    5. Press 1 for English.



    Glad that's cleared up. Makes perfect sense.
  • sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,202member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    There's Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional and Ultimate (ignoring of course Enterprise and Server) so yeah that's ummmm 1,2,3,4,5 versions - for Windows 7.



    We are obviously going to ignore Windows Mobile, Win Phone 7, Windows Home Server, Windows XP Embedded, Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs, and Windows Embedded CE 6.0, because, well because we can. And probably should.



    And we are going to ignore the roughly 30% of the current market that is still running XP desktop. Again, because we can. And probably should.



    Never. You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.











    Well done. My school district staff laptops still run XP and will for at least another year.
  • lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,255member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jmgregory1 View Post


    Yes - each with its own set of conditions - which is why people end up buying the wrong thing and having to try to swap for what they hope is the right upgrade/new system.



    Again, it's made for a group of people who don't want change or only want a part-change and MS is willing to try to accommodate them all. Their model is just so old-school, but given they have to build their system to operate on such a wide and wildly different group of computers from different computer manufacturers, it's no wonder they've done things the way they have.



    Your answer is sensible. Please refrain from such displays of intelligence, or people might turn a blind eye on you
  • jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,084member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    This is the best news in the whole story. I am SOOOOOO sick of having to enter Microsoft's 25 digit code every time I install a Microsoft product.



    yes, you just have to enter your bank account number so if you download it and give it to other people, they'll know how much to charge you for each copy.
  • jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,084member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TheShepherd View Post


    Is Apple going to copy the hardware prices of Window based machines?



    They don't have too. They make the most profit out of all the PC companies. Also, the other PC companies can't compete with the MBA on price/performance.
  • dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 11,410member
    If you can buy their OS online...



    With what will MS stock the shelves of their high-priced retail stores?
  • conradjoeconradjoe Posts: 1,887member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    1.44 million files. That is some serious bloat.




    Generally, Microsoft includes basic drivers for any and all peripherals right out of the box. Likely that accounts for some of the files.



    Additionally, many things are never installed, depending on user preference., Instead, they reside in compressed files, waiting for the need to install. For example, if you plug into pretty much any USB device, Windows figures out what it is, installs the driver from a compressed file, and you are good to go.



    So while there are a lot of files, many are just stored until they are needed. It seems better to me that things like accessibility options for the blind, multiple language and font packs, etc. are available, but remain uninstalled unless needed.
  • mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    If you can buy their OS online...



    With what will MS stock the shelves of their high-priced retail stores?



    Anti virus software.
  • dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 11,410member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Anti virus software.



    I think I just poohed me knickers...
  • mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post


    Windows figures out what it is, installs the driver from a compressed file, and you are good to go.



    I wish it would stop telling me it found new hardware wanting to install drivers for my RAID, a couple minutes after it already booted from said RAID.
  • davemcm76davemcm76 Posts: 259member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    What about the 32-bit and 64-bit versions? I'd count those. So twelve.



    When I bought Windows 7 Home Premium (first version of windows I've ever actually paid for - bought 2 copies at £45 each with the pre order discount) you got both the 32 and 64 bit DVDs in the same box and a single license code, so I'm not sure they really count as separate products any more like they did with XP... You can't buy "Windows 7 32 bit" and "Windows 7 64 bit" separately.



    Saying that though it could still get very confusing for your average consumer as to which DVD they need to install from...
  • jmgregory1jmgregory1 Posts: 384member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lightknight View Post


    Your answer is sensible. Please refrain from such displays of intelligence, or people might turn a blind eye on you



    Thanks, I think. I've just recently had the revelation that it's change that is causing many of the issues we face in the world - or the fear of change, resistance to change, etc.



    Only adaptors of change will move forward because evolution is happening in all things. Forget about apes to humans - think communication, learning, business, travel/transportation. You have a company like RIM who clearly nailed it when they created their push email service, but times changed and now their miraculous system isn't really any better than any of the other options out there - plus RIM's lack of moving forward (change) to address the other things people have become accustomed to things (like seamless web, specific apps, maps) that other manufacturers have made almost ubiquitous.
  • ssquirrelssquirrel Posts: 1,196member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    1.44 million files. That is some serious bloat.



    How many does Lion have?



    If only it would take a million 1.44MB floppy disks to install. Imagine the size of the box for the OS
  • mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jmgregory1 View Post


    Thanks, I think. I've just recently had the revelation that it's change that is causing many of the issues we face in the world - or the fear of change, resistance to change, etc.



    I'm still waiting for my jet pack they promised. And what about that paperless office? Instead all I got is cyber crime and emails from the nephew of the former Nigerian finance minister. The future may not turn out like you planned. After all in the 25th century Captain Picard is still as bald as a cue ball. What happened to Hair Club for Men? Did they go out of business?
  • benanderson89benanderson89 Posts: 580member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    I wish it would stop telling me it found new hardware wanting to install drivers for my RAID, a couple minutes after it already booted from said RAID.



    I wish it wouldn't:

    1) reinstall drivers for an already installed USB device purely because it was inserted into a different port from last time, and;

    2) take so DAMN long before the hardware starts responding. I plug a USB device into my iMac (graphics tablet, USB MIDI/Sound interface, Mouse, Toaster oven etc.) and I can use said device instantly. I plug a mouse into a windows computer and I have to sit and wait for plug and play to wake the f*** up!



    The thing I really hate about windows' handling of USB devices is with USB Hard disk drives.



    I want to unplug my 2.5" hard disk from my Mac, I tell it to eject from finder, you hear the disk rev down and click the read-write head back into position so its then safe to carry around. I Tell the same disk to eject from my windows computer, the thing is still spinning at full speed with the write head (most likely) still hovering over the disk surface. The only option I have is to yank out the USB cable cutting power to the disk without it actually receiving any instruction to power down! A slight shock without power and that disk is done for
  • ssquirrelssquirrel Posts: 1,196member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaveMcM76 View Post


    When I bought Windows 7 Home Premium (first version of windows I've ever actually paid for - bought 2 copies at £45 each with the pre order discount) you got both the 32 and 64 bit DVDs in the same box and a single license code, so I'm not sure they really count as separate products any more like they did with XP... You can't buy "Windows 7 32 bit" and "Windows 7 64 bit" separately.



    Saying that though it could still get very confusing for your average consumer as to which DVD they need to install from...



    Yeah, Windows 7 included both w/the purchase, but Vista sold them separately I believe and the 64 bit version of XP was something that came along down the pipe. I'm sure wikipedia will correct me if I'm wrong
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