iCloud scam email, watch out!!!

Posted:
in iCloud edited January 2014
A spam email redirecting you to a fake Apple website claiming that you will have to verify your iCloud information in order to migrate from MobileMe and keep all your settings.







Comments

  • tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 39,978member
    If the @cloud.com and completely wrong URL didn't tip people off, well?



    Anyway, thanks for the tip about this.
  • gatorguygatorguy Posts: 14,495member
    I think a lot of Apple folk who received it would be fooled. Phishing emails with Apple's name on it are really uncommon aren't they?



    The misspelling in the first paragraph would have me questioning it tho.
  • peter55peter55 Posts: 1member


    The email takes advantage of the forthcoming transition from MobileMe to iCloud.

     


     


     


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  • benanderson89benanderson89 Posts: 580member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post



    If the @cloud.com and completely wrong URL didn't tip people off, well?



    Anyway, thanks for the tip about this.


    Yet people still get easily fooled by little tricks such as this. Since I started pulling double duty as developer and IT support I've come to realize just how much people like you and I take our computer literacy for granted. Christ on Bollock Waffles have I seen some sorry excuses for computer users, like a woman who asked me to email her document back to her because it was the only copy she had and didn't want me loosing it. If you can get her train of thought from that I'll buy you a drink at the bar.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post



    I think a lot of Apple folk who received it would be fooled. Phishing emails with Apple's name on it are really uncommon aren't they?



    The misspelling in the first paragraph would have me questioning it tho.


    I didn't even notice the spelling mistake until you pointed it out. Its all about the frame of mind the person is currently in: I was tired and skimming through it all and as long as the word vaguely looked like what it was supposed to look like and I could still understand it I was perfectly happy. Its actually a psychology trick I first stumbled across printed on an amusing poster on the wall of my maths class well over a decade ago. Long story, interesting read, told you at the end that every word was spelled incorrectly and everyone's mind was boggled from that moment onwards.

  • bostonapplebostonapple Posts: 2member


    This round of fraud emails are very authentic.  We got 5 of them today on different accounts.  One of which was an alias email address used for our service reply emails.  They have Apple return email address and all. I spent 3 hours on the with Apple this afternoon - even a 3rd level tech seemed to think the email was from Apple until he clicked the link an dit took him to a spoof Apple site with an IP address routed through China.

  • benanderson89benanderson89 Posts: 580member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bostonapple View Post


    This round of fraud emails are very authentic.  We got 5 of them today on different accounts.  One of which was an alias email address used for our service reply emails.  They have Apple return email address and all. I spent 3 hours on the with Apple this afternoon - even a 3rd level tech seemed to think the email was from Apple until he clicked the link an dit took him to a spoof Apple site with an IP address routed through China.



    The best way to check where an email is from is to check its headers.


     


    Double click a message in Mail to open it in its own window, then select View > Message > All Headers. There will usually be something in there that doesn't match up correctly. For example - the return address wont match the sender address, or it will have a point of origin which doesn't match the sender address. We had a mail supposedly from one of our suppliers at work - but upon checking the headers we found it had actually originated from a yahoo.nl account.


     


    Examples of some headers from AppleInsider:


  • husena12husena12 Posts: 3member


    yea, I also agree that many people were fooled by this.But thanks for the tip!!

  • wirelessvictorywirelessvictory Posts: 2member


    I received something like this, thanks for the tips.

  • rob_06rob_06 Posts: 75member


    So far I haven't seen this one but will now keep a watch incase.


     


    Thanks for the heads up


     


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  • ksievertksievert Posts: 2member


    I also get such mails most of the time but I never replied to it,well thanks for the tip.


     


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