No, Apple did not switch to USB-C on its new MacBook Pros to profit from dongle & adapter sales

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  • Reply 21 of 125
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,554member
    macxpress said:
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    This might sound really stupid to you (and others), but packaging? Apple is all about putting things in the smallest box possible and making it look pretty. That cable would have made the box larger. This means they'd need a larger box which means they can't ship as many from China. I wouldn't be surprised if this is exactly why they didn't ship the extension cable with the 12" MacBook and new MacBook Pros. That cable would not fit in the box it ships in and they don't want to ship a larger box. 
    have you seen the size of the box Apple Watches ship in? total waste. 
    Can you explain? My Apple Watch Sport comes in a very slim box that seems ideal for minimizing volume. The other Watch types do take up more room, but it seems based on the metal band being a single loop. This one could be smaller, but I don't see it as "total waste." What am I missing?
    StrangeDayssphericnetmageDeelron
  • Reply 22 of 125
    Had apple shipped a usb C cable with the iPhone, these same people will say that they now need an adapter to connected to usb A only computers.

    Also, apple is not the only seller of adapters, ya know.
    common sense will tell you as much,, but I have seen many people who simply never think.
    EG, mac rumors.
    I bet you if a Mac Pro, iMac, or MacMini (all 2017) come(s) out with all Type-C, we could see Apple put a Type-C to Lightning cable standard the iPhone 8 (any) (or 7s i.e. 2017) box... Just a thought, because once all Macs (latest shipping) have Type-C, then that's that...
    netmage
  • Reply 23 of 125
    Remember 1998 when the first iMac came out? There weren't a lot of USB devices so you had to buy USB to ADC and USB to serial adapters.
    chiastompypscooter63macguiStrangeDays
  • Reply 24 of 125
    I love the new USB-c/ TB3. It'd be great with 6 ports. Personally I will miss the SD card slot. I'm using it all the time. But now I'll be using my card reader all the time instead :)

    Also ALL USB-C/ TB3 cables should be sold from day one. HDMI, all USB flavours, mini daisy chain hubs, FireWire, everything.
  • Reply 25 of 125
    How long has Apple tried pushing the industry to use one cable for almost everything and yet it ended up only on Apple computers. This time the industry is behind it and USB-C will be the "one cable" to rule them all (USB,Thunderbolt,Video,Power,etc)... :)
    ty@icloudchiabrucemc
  • Reply 26 of 125
    Apple is probably the last company that is jonesing for profit from accssories. 

    The very notion is ridiculous. But the industry and market are flooded with ignorati. The struggle is real.
    pscooter63brucemcStrangeDaysnetmage
  • Reply 27 of 125
    mknelson said:
    Remember 1998 when the first iMac came out? There weren't a lot of USB devices so you had to buy USB to ADC and USB to serial adapters.
    The original iMac moved from proprietary ports for keyboard, modem, and network (ADB, GeoPort) to the industry standard USB.
    It removed the extra cost of accessories for Mac and gave us access to more devices.

    This is different. What exactly do we gain by not having MagSafe and mini DisplayPort? Now all our dongles and power adapters are of no value. It has reduced the stickiness of Mac as a platform. Perhaps this will be seen as a New Coke moment for Apple.
    elijahgbrucemcpscooter63netmage
  • Reply 28 of 125


    "next they'll remove the keyboard and sell a dongle for that"!  Lol
    elijahgdoggone
  • Reply 29 of 125
    I realize that it's the ‘in thing’ to jab at Apple’s “courage” comment these days but there is truth to it too.

    When a manufacturer is too scared at potentially alienating customers in the short term, you end up mired in legacy—parallel ports, PS/2 ports, VGA, compact flash, etc. You also end up with software like Windows XP, that people just won't let go of and yet at the same time is a nightmare to continually support and patch.

    When you coddle a customer by making it painless to stick with older things, they transition much more slowly. When you throw in dongles for free or keep old ports around, you make incentive to press forward less motivating.

    Apple would prefer that, where possible, people go for wireless options like wireless syncing instead of Lightning cables. And if you do have a scenario where you need an adapter, by making you pay for it, it gets you to consider newer, more modern options.

    You may disagree, but I think this approach has genuinely helped Apple’s user base embrace new standards significantly faster than other ecosystems.
    stompychiapscooter63brucemcStrangeDaysRayz2016netmageDaekwan
  • Reply 30 of 125
    stompystompy Posts: 291member
    nubus said:
    mknelson said:
    Remember 1998 when the first iMac came out? There weren't a lot of USB devices so you had to buy USB to ADC and USB to serial adapters.
    The original iMac moved from proprietary ports for keyboard, modem, and network (ADB, GeoPort) to the industry standard USB.
    It removed the extra cost of accessories for Mac and gave us access to more devices.

    This is different. What exactly do we gain by not having MagSafe and mini DisplayPort? Now all our dongles and power adapters are of no value.
    The switch to USB eventually gave us access to more devices, but MacWorld had this to say in May, 1998:

    "Currently, no USB devices exist for the Mac."

    While USB was on many PCs prior to the iMac, I remember that virtually all of them still shipped with PS2 keyboards and mice. USB, a standard in 1998? Well, it was a "standard" from the day it was released, but it was not the de facto standard in 1998 that you seem to be claiming it was.

    For an accurate account of how forward looking USB was on the first iMac, read this post on Stephen Hackett's blog, 512 pixels. He's a noted Mac history buff, and also provides 1998 quotes about the state of USB on the PC (see the "waffling" quote).

    The state of USB-C today is ahead of where USB was when the original iMac was announced in 1998.
    chiamacpluspluspscooter63StrangeDaysai46Rayz2016netmageDeelronDaekwan
  • Reply 31 of 125
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    Because Lightning is a proprietary interface. Neither USB-A nor USB-C are owned by Apple and solutions already exist. A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter. USB doesn't require that and any third party solution would work.
    edited December 2016
  • Reply 32 of 125
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,554member
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    Because Lightning is a proprietary interface. Neither USB-A nor USB-C are owned by Apple and solutions already exist. A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter. USB doesn't require that and any third party solution would work.
    1) I believe you missed his point. He's talking having an adapter that is USB-C-to-USB-A so that it can plug into the USB-A-to-Lighting cable, not replacing Lighting with USB-C (or USB-A on the iPhone.

    2) Rogifan been told many, many times why Apple is dropping all USB-A or including USB-C support in all their mobile devices instantly simply because a couple Macs now support USB-C: 99.999999% of the world still doesn't use USB-C. While I would like to see Apple offer a free USB-A-to-Lightning cable replacement program for new MBP owners, the fact remains that if you want a new Mac that could thousands of dollars and you also need to plug in a cable that has USB-A, then you're not reasonable to bitch about a $4–9 adapter to do the job. Personally, I'd just buy new cables.

    Additionally, while I suspect that Apple will start migrating to USB-C on their devices this year, there won't be a tipping point for years in terms of new buyers and then years after that before more than half have a machine that supports that USB-C. If they start this year with iPhones or iPads, they'll probably have to include a USB-C-to-USB-A adapter because of the still virtual non-existiance of USB-C amongst most PC users, and the infrequency in which people update their PCs compared to other mobile devices.
    StrangeDaysnetmage
  • Reply 33 of 125
    Soli said:
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    Because Lightning is a proprietary interface. Neither USB-A nor USB-C are owned by Apple and solutions already exist. A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter. USB doesn't require that and any third party solution would work.
    1) I believe you missed his point. He's talking having an adapter that is USB-C-to-USB-A so that it can plug into the USB-A-to-Lighting cable, not replacing Lighting with USB-C (or USB-A on the iPhone.

    I said nothing about replacing Lightning with USB. I get his point and I answer factually. And I think my answer is the only correct one among all submitted yet. Lightning is Apple's property and this is why Apple must supply a Lightning to analog adapter for headphones in the box. Since people cannot get that adapter from a third party due to licensing issues, Apple must supply it, otherwise people's expensive headphones would be unusable.

    In contrast USB is not a property of Apple and people can get a third party adapter to connect a USB-A port to a USB-C one. So Apple does not have to supply one in the box.

    Edit:
    Anyway, I replied to his post #2 you talk about his post #9.
    edited December 2016 macguiStrangeDays
  • Reply 34 of 125
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,554member
    Soli said:
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    Because Lightning is a proprietary interface. Neither USB-A nor USB-C are owned by Apple and solutions already exist. A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter. USB doesn't require that and any third party solution would work.
    1) I believe you missed his point. He's talking having an adapter that is USB-C-to-USB-A so that it can plug into the USB-A-to-Lighting cable, not replacing Lighting with USB-C (or USB-A on the iPhone.

    I said nothing about replacing Lightning with USB. I get his point and I answer factually. And I think my answer is the only correct one among all submitted yet. Lightning is Apple's property and this is why Apple must supply a Lightning to analog adapter for headphones in the box. Since people cannot get that adapter from a third party due to licensing issues, Apple must supply it, otherwise people's expensive headphones would be unusable.

    In contrast USB is not a property of Apple and people can get a third party adapter to connect a USB-A port to a USB-C one. So Apple does not have to supply one in the box.

    Edit:
    Anyway, I replied to his post #2 you talk about his post #9.
    You wrote, "Because Lightning is a proprietary interface" and "A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter" in reply to Rogifan referring to a "USB-C to USB-A" adapter being included in the box. There is nothing proprietary about that adapter and nothing that needs certification from the MFi program, but even if it did if we're talking about replacing USB-A or including with a USB-C-to-Lightning cable so it would still be Apple's cable, so not a 3rd-party.
    edited December 2016 netmage
  • Reply 35 of 125
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 108member
    sflocal said:
    MplsP said:
    A laptop is intrinsically a computer with compromises, but you make those compromises for convenience (size, portability, etc.) Not including USB A ports significantly compromises the convenience and usability of the device for at least the next 1-2 years. To voluntarily design a laptop to make it more inconvenient is just moronic. But at least they have courage. 
    USB ports themselves are becoming obsolete (up to a point) for most people.  Most printers are WiFi/AirPrint capable, cloud storage, AirDrop, AirPlay, etc... what the heck is left for people to require a USB port for other than docks, Thunderbolt devices, external monitors, etc..

    I don't know many people that plug anything into their USB ports anymore.  Sure, there are exceptions... quite a few, including me, but the reality is if people here are complaining about USB-A to USBc, seriously... cry me a river.
    I regularly have people give me USB A flash drives and I have a security key that is USB A. 

    The price of the dongle is an annoyance, but not an obstacle. If you can afford $2k for a laptop, you can afford $20 for a dongle (but on the flip side, if they're charging me $2k for a laptop with ports that no one is using yet, the least they could do is throw in the dongle.) The real issue for me is that there was really no need to do it. They could have easily had both ports. As it is, you're stuck carrying around the dongles or are potentially screwed if you don't have the right one with. Definitely not what I pay $2000 for.
    netmage
  • Reply 36 of 125
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    Because Lightning is a proprietary interface. Neither USB-A nor USB-C are owned by Apple and solutions already exist. A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter. USB doesn't require that and any third party solution would work.
    1) I believe you missed his point. He's talking having an adapter that is USB-C-to-USB-A so that it can plug into the USB-A-to-Lighting cable, not replacing Lighting with USB-C (or USB-A on the iPhone.

    I said nothing about replacing Lightning with USB. I get his point and I answer factually. And I think my answer is the only correct one among all submitted yet. Lightning is Apple's property and this is why Apple must supply a Lightning to analog adapter for headphones in the box. Since people cannot get that adapter from a third party due to licensing issues, Apple must supply it, otherwise people's expensive headphones would be unusable.

    In contrast USB is not a property of Apple and people can get a third party adapter to connect a USB-A port to a USB-C one. So Apple does not have to supply one in the box.

    Edit:
    Anyway, I replied to his post #2 you talk about his post #9.
    You wrote, "Because Lightning is a proprietary interface" and "A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter" in reply to Rogifan referring to a "USB-C to USB-A" adapter being included in the box. There is nothing proprietary about that adapter and nothing that needs certification from the MFi program, but even if it did if we're talking about replacing USB-A or including with a USB-C-to-Lightning cable so it would still be Apple's cable, so not a 3rd-party.
    No, not:
    "in reply to Rogifan referring to a "USB-C to USB-A" adapter being included in the box"

    but:
    in reply to Rogifan referring to a Lightning to analog adapter by his statement "
    We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box"

    that I said "Lightning is a proprietary interface". I've just compared the two adapters mentioned by Rogifan, that's all.
    edited December 2016 macgui
  • Reply 37 of 125
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,554member
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    Because Lightning is a proprietary interface. Neither USB-A nor USB-C are owned by Apple and solutions already exist. A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter. USB doesn't require that and any third party solution would work.
    1) I believe you missed his point. He's talking having an adapter that is USB-C-to-USB-A so that it can plug into the USB-A-to-Lighting cable, not replacing Lighting with USB-C (or USB-A on the iPhone.

    I said nothing about replacing Lightning with USB. I get his point and I answer factually. And I think my answer is the only correct one among all submitted yet. Lightning is Apple's property and this is why Apple must supply a Lightning to analog adapter for headphones in the box. Since people cannot get that adapter from a third party due to licensing issues, Apple must supply it, otherwise people's expensive headphones would be unusable.

    In contrast USB is not a property of Apple and people can get a third party adapter to connect a USB-A port to a USB-C one. So Apple does not have to supply one in the box.

    Edit:
    Anyway, I replied to his post #2 you talk about his post #9.
    You wrote, "Because Lightning is a proprietary interface" and "A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter" in reply to Rogifan referring to a "USB-C to USB-A" adapter being included in the box. There is nothing proprietary about that adapter and nothing that needs certification from the MFi program, but even if it did if we're talking about replacing USB-A or including with a USB-C-to-Lightning cable so it would still be Apple's cable, so not a 3rd-party.
    No, not:
    "in reply to Rogifan referring to a "USB-C to USB-A" adapter being included in the box"

    but:
    in reply to Rogifan referring to a Lightning to analog adapter by his statement "We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box".
    As I stated, you missed his point about the inclusion of an adapter as his example can be removed from the statement, but s/he's missed the point of why one makes sense with nearly every 3rd-party, wired headphone has a 3.5mm plug yet nearly no one has a PC that supports that's USB-C. There are probably more headphones in use that have a Lightning connector than all PC in use that only support USB-C.
    edited December 2016
  • Reply 38 of 125
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    Is there a reason Apple didn't ship a USB-C to USB-A cable in the box? We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box. What's the difference?
    Because Lightning is a proprietary interface. Neither USB-A nor USB-C are owned by Apple and solutions already exist. A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter. USB doesn't require that and any third party solution would work.
    1) I believe you missed his point. He's talking having an adapter that is USB-C-to-USB-A so that it can plug into the USB-A-to-Lighting cable, not replacing Lighting with USB-C (or USB-A on the iPhone.

    I said nothing about replacing Lightning with USB. I get his point and I answer factually. And I think my answer is the only correct one among all submitted yet. Lightning is Apple's property and this is why Apple must supply a Lightning to analog adapter for headphones in the box. Since people cannot get that adapter from a third party due to licensing issues, Apple must supply it, otherwise people's expensive headphones would be unusable.

    In contrast USB is not a property of Apple and people can get a third party adapter to connect a USB-A port to a USB-C one. So Apple does not have to supply one in the box.

    Edit:
    Anyway, I replied to his post #2 you talk about his post #9.
    You wrote, "Because Lightning is a proprietary interface" and "A third party must go through MFi mechanism to legally release a Lightning to analog adapter" in reply to Rogifan referring to a "USB-C to USB-A" adapter being included in the box. There is nothing proprietary about that adapter and nothing that needs certification from the MFi program, but even if it did if we're talking about replacing USB-A or including with a USB-C-to-Lightning cable so it would still be Apple's cable, so not a 3rd-party.
    No, not:
    "in reply to Rogifan referring to a "USB-C to USB-A" adapter being included in the box"

    but:
    in reply to Rogifan referring to a Lightning to analog adapter by his statement "We got a headphone jack adapter in the iPhone 7 box".
    As I stated, you missed his point about the inclusion of an adapter as his example can be removed from the statement, but s/he's missed the point of why one makes sense with nearly every 3rd-party, wired headphone has a 3.5mm plug yet nearly no one has a PC that supports that's USB-C. There are probably more headphones in use that have a Lightning connector than all PC in use that only support USB-C.
    In that post #2 the only point Rogifan has "Why while one adapter is included in the box the other is not?". I don't see any other point to miss or catch in that post #2.
    macgui
  • Reply 39 of 125
    AppleBumAppleBum Posts: 33unconfirmed, member
    Adding a USB-C to A adapter in the MB or MBP box seems like a no-brainer to me. USB-A is so prevalent in this day and age.
    edited December 2016 netmage
  • Reply 40 of 125
    dacloodacloo Posts: 890member
    This article focuses on the wrong area. We all know they don't want to monetize from an open standard. A 3 sentence article would have sufficed.

    I was surprised to see the iPhone7 didn't move to USB-C. The real question is "why does Apple stick with the lightning port when USB-C is superior and more standard?"

    If Apple sticks with their proprietary port for the iPhone8 and tablets in 2017, it proves they don't put the consumer first but only act out of self-interest to monetize from cables. There's no reason not to do it.  
    singularitynetmage
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