Intel launches new Kaby Lake chips suited for Apple's MacBook Pro, iMac

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware
Intel has rounded off its Kaby Lake processor line with new quad- and dual-core high-performance chips for mobile and desktop, with some of the new offerings suitable for a future iMac and Mac Pro refresh, though it's unlikely the just-refreshed MacBook Pro will see Kaby Lake in the short term.


S-series for a possible future iMac and other desktops

The desktop-oriented S-series Core i7-7700K has a clock speed of 4.2 GHz with a peak speed of 4.5 GHz Turbo Boost, with 8 MB of cache, and support for HyperThreading. The Core i7-7700 has speeds of 3.6 GHz, with 4.2 GHz peak, also with 8 MB cache and HyperThreading. The i-7700K has a thermal design profile (TDP) of 95W, with the i7-7700 having only 65W TDP.

Further down the line is the Core i5-7600K, with a 3.8 GHz base speed, and up to 4.2 GHz Turbo Boost. It has 6 MB of L3 cache, but lacks HyperThreading. The Core i5-7600 comes in at of 3.50 GHz core with 4.10 GHz Turbo Boost. The Core i5-7500 has a 3.4 GHz clock speed, with a 3.8 GHz max speed. As with the i7 versions, the i5-7600K requires 95W, with the i5-7600 having a 65W TDP.



All of the new chips include Intel's HD Graphics 630 integrated graphics core, with support for 10-bit (HDR) HEVC and VP9 hardware acceleration.

Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook has recently declared in an internal memo that there were great Mac desktops in the product pipeline. The Kaby Lake S-series would be an obvious inclusion in a new iMac.

E3 Xeon Processor expansion

While Intel has a few E3 Xeon processors utilizing the Kaby Lake architecture already, two more were added to the line on Tuesday.

Both models are quad-core. The higher-end model has a base frequency of 3.1 GHz, with a 4.2 peak speed on a single core. The second model has a 3.0 Ghz base speed, with a single core max speed of 4.0 Ghz.

Both E3 Xeon processors have a 65W TDP.

While the new E3 processors could be used in a new Mac Pro, previous Xeon processors not utilizing the Kaby Lake architecture are better suited for any potential refresh of the three-year-old powerhouse computer.

H-series for laptops

The new H-series processors for high-end desktop replacements have seven processors in the line, none with a TDP greater than 45W.

The i7-7920HQ is the high-end of the line, with a base frequency of 3.1 GHz, and a peak speed of 4.1 GHz. Quad-core processors are available in the line through 2.5 GHz, with a dual-core i3 model at 3.0 GHz.

All of the H-series processors also use the Intel HD 630 integrated graphics chipset. The Iris Pro chipset has not been included in any of the new chips.



With Apple having recently updated the MacBook Pro, an inclusion of new H-series processors any time in the immediate future seems unlikely.

T-series processors

Intel also debuted the T-class Core i7 and Core i5 processors, with lower energy requirements of 35W.

The Core i7-7700T leads the power-efficient line, with 2.90 GHz with 3.8 GHz peak speed, 8 MB L3 cache, and HyperThreading. The Core i5-7600T has a 2.80 GHz core clock, a 3.70 GHz Turbo Boost speed, 6 MB L3 cache, and no HyperThreading. The the Core i5-7500T is a 2.70 GHz processor, and can hit 3.3 GHz.


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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 96
    IanSIanS Posts: 8member
    About time!
    repressthiswatto_cobrastantheman
  • Reply 2 of 96
    Took long enough. what a joke of a company.
    repressthispulseimages1983watto_cobradysamoria
  • Reply 3 of 96
    That will be awesome for Apple to roll out new models 4 months after I invested in their below average iteration of the MacBookPro.
    repressthistmaypulseimagessnype719brucemcalbegarclkruppwilliamlondondysamoriapscooter63
  • Reply 4 of 96
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 2,369member
    That will be awesome for Apple to roll out new models 4 months after I invested in their below average iteration of the MacBookPro.
    I wouldn't count on Apple updating the MacBook Pro anytime soon...what you see is what they'll offer for at least the next 6-8 months.


    It also looks like the CPUs that could go in a MacBook Pro still do not support LPDDR4 RAM. They do appear to support DDR4 RAM, just not LPDDR4 RAM. Maybe I'm reading this wrong, no? If true, then Apple would absolutely not be updating the MacBook Pro, but instead waiting on a chipset that supports what they need unless they want to continue maxing the RAM out at 16GB total. 

    It will be interesting to see what Apple does with these new chips. I hope they've had some prototypes in their hands so they could be developing new/updated Macs around them. 
    edited January 3 repressthiswilliamlondonwatto_cobrajay-tstantheman
  • Reply 5 of 96
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,060member
    That will be awesome for Apple to roll out new models 4 months after I invested in their below average iteration of the MacBookPro.
    1) Apple doesn't update their Macs enough. Apple updates their Macs too soon. No matter what they do someone will complain about it.

    2) And when they do update, historically the price will drop after having raised it to include expensive new HW in a new casing design, like when the Retina displays arrived.
    edited January 3 repressthisandrewj5790lkruppanomewatto_cobrapscooter63firelock
  • Reply 6 of 96
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 2,369member
    That will be awesome for Apple to roll out new models 4 months after I invested in their below average iteration of the MacBookPro.
    If you were so unhappy with it then why didn't you return it? Obviously something made you keep it. If you thought it was "below average" then why did you buy it in the first place? What are you using it for that makes it "below average"?
    Solibkkcanuckrepressthisandrewj5790pulseimagesRayz2016mike1brucemcpatchythepiratealbegarc
  • Reply 8 of 96
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,137member
    macxpress said:
    That will be awesome for Apple to roll out new models 4 months after I invested in their below average iteration of the MacBookPro.
    I wouldn't count on Apple updating the MacBook Pro anytime soon...what you see is what they'll offer for at least the next 6-8 months.


    It also looks like the CPUs that could go in a MacBook Pro still do not support LPDDR4 RAM. They do appear to support DDR4 RAM, just not LPDDR4 RAM. Maybe I'm reading this wrong, no? If true, then Apple would absolutely not be updating the MacBook Pro, but instead waiting on a chipset that supports what they need unless they want to continue maxing the RAM out at 16GB total. 

    It will be interesting to see what Apple does with these new chips. I hope they've had some prototypes in their hands so they could be developing new/updated Macs around them. 
    "It also looks like the CPUs that could go in a MacBook Pro still do not support LPDDR4 RAM"

    Correct. They don't.  Not till Cannon Lake or Coffee Lake, which is next year.
    repressthispulseimagesewtheckmanpatchythepirateanomewatto_cobrajay-tstantheman
  • Reply 9 of 96
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,247member
    Soli said:
    That will be awesome for Apple to roll out new models 4 months after I invested in their below average iteration of the MacBookPro.
    1) Apple doesn't their Macs enough. Apple updates their Macs too soon. No matter what they do someone will complain about it.

    2) And when they do update, historically the price will drop after having raised it to include expensive new HW in a new casing design, like when the Retina displays arrived.
    After they make some of their development money back, I might add. With the new MBPs, we're also paying more for what must be more expensive components, such as the new oxide wide-gamut display. 

    Gruber and Ritchie were talking on the last Talk Show podcast about the Touch Bar's development. Supposedly they have been on it for 10 years. There's an unusual amount of work in these new laptops, seems to me. Still, as you say, the prices will drop over time.
    edited January 3 Soliai46repressthismacplusplusalbegarcwatto_cobrawonkothesane
  • Reply 10 of 96
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 859member
    We humans on earth need Mac/Macbook to have sanity otherwise Microsoft's ugly Windows will take over our house. In my life time, ain't going to happen!!! 2016 Macbook Pro is excellent in size,shape and weight but besides needing powerful Intel processor, it needs(at lower end) of Macbook Pro at-least 3 Type-C ports(one one each side for power + one for attaching peripheral) Seriously, now Apple should target 10nm Intel processors to embed into Macbook pro and address any issues that users have in current Mac book Pro.
    edited January 3
  • Reply 11 of 96
    xgmanxgman Posts: 143member
    I guess Moores law or whatever it is is dead as a doornail as far as raw speed is concerned. Been stuck around 4gz for some years now.
    pulseimagesbaconstangdws-2
  • Reply 12 of 96
    Garbage processor upgrade from Intel. Anandtech already has a review up and they are literally the same performance as Skylake. The only advantages they bring are support for Optane and DRM on 4K video. Oh, and 4 extra PCI lanes for accessories. Big deal.

    Might be time for Apple to consider a switch to the new AMD Ryzen desktop chips. Eagerly waiting for the first reviews on those processors.
    repressthispulseimageswilliamlondonmrboba1jasenj1
  • Reply 13 of 96
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 11,820moderator

    Couldn't multiple Apple ARM chips be used to outperform a single Intel chip?
    pulseimagesbrucemcwatto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 14 of 96
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,060member
    Garbage processor upgrade from Intel. Anandtech already has a review up and they are literally the same performance as Skylake. The only advantages they bring are support for Optane and DRM on 4K video. Oh, and 4 extra PCI lanes for accessories. Big deal.

    Might be time for Apple to consider a switch to the new AMD Ryzen desktop chips. Eagerly waiting for the first reviews on those processors.
    How is better power efficiency and a lower TDP for a given clockrate garbage? I don't think you're understanding the optimization part of the 3-step cycle. I thought AnandTech has been clear on this: 
    "But this is what we kind of expected from an ‘Optimization’ step in the ‘Process, Architecture, Optimization’ way of doing things: we weren’t expecting to be amazed with the product, but nodding and approving of better efficiency."
    repressthiswonkothesanefastasleep
  • Reply 15 of 96
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 1,263member

    Couldn't multiple Apple ARM chips be used to outperform a single Intel chip?
    Good question. 
    watto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 16 of 96
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,060member
    Couldn't multiple Apple ARM chips be used to outperform a single Intel chip?
    Why not one chip? It's foolish to assume that the chip in the iPad Pro is the fastest chip Apple can design, but even it was, it already bests many of Intel's current offerings in many areas while being considerably less expensive for a given power envelope.

    The question you should be asking is when will it be the right time to introduce an ARM-based Mac or Mac-like traditional PC to the lower-end of their market.
    patchythepiratewatto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 17 of 96

    Couldn't multiple Apple ARM chips be used to outperform a single Intel chip?
    Possibly, but then we'd lose the ability to virtualize which is (sadly) still a requirement for some of us who use our Macs in the enterprise.
    repressthisIronhead
  • Reply 18 of 96
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,060member

    Couldn't multiple Apple ARM chips be used to outperform a single Intel chip?
    Possibly, but then we'd lose the ability to virtualize which is (sadly) still a requirement for some of us who use our Macs in the enterprise.
    Don't look at it as an all-or-nothing option. Just because they re-introduce the MacBook with an ARM chip and with a much lower MSRP, doesn't mean that the MacBook Pro wouldn't still get Intel chips for the foreseeable future.
    canukstormwatto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 19 of 96
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 11,820moderator
    Rayz2016 said:

    Couldn't multiple Apple ARM chips be used to outperform a single Intel chip?
    Good question. 

    Or a Single IBM Power chip vs an Intel Chip:


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_POWER_microprocessors
  • Reply 20 of 96
    Soli said:
    Garbage processor upgrade from Intel. Anandtech already has a review up and they are literally the same performance as Skylake. The only advantages they bring are support for Optane and DRM on 4K video. Oh, and 4 extra PCI lanes for accessories. Big deal.

    Might be time for Apple to consider a switch to the new AMD Ryzen desktop chips. Eagerly waiting for the first reviews on those processors.
    How is better power efficiency and a lower TDP for a given clockrate garbage? I don't think you're understanding the optimization part of the 3-step cycle. I thought AnandTech has been clear on this: 
    "But this is what we kind of expected from an ‘Optimization’ step in the ‘Process, Architecture, Optimization’ way of doing things: we weren’t expecting to be amazed with the product, but nodding and approving of better efficiency."


    TDP isn't power draw, but what the package can dissipate. And what does power consumption have to do in a desktop processor? You think people buying new iMacs will care if they consume marginally less energy (overall) but have no gain in performance?

    They might have done some optimization on the power, but have done literally 0 on the CPU. Aside from the very small clock increases, the new CPU cores have the exact same IPC as the old Skylake cores.

    And this is what Intel passes off as innovation these days? A whole year for no processor performance increase and a slight reduction in power?
    repressthis
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