Verizon plans purge of 200GB+ bandwidth hogging unlimited data users

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    sog35sog35 Posts: 11,610member
    YP101 said:
    There is no unlimited plan available currently in Verizon wireless.

    Verizon just keep the unlimited plan for those people never left or converted.
    Current Verizon wireless plan has only up to 30GB.

    For those unlimited plan holder customer getting 100GB sounds not that bad.

    Used to be that unlimited plan cost was $30 then now paying $59.99.
    Current price for $70, you can only getting 8GB+2GB. 

    Stop complaining.. You still have so called unlimited(but cap on 100GB) plan.

    If you don't like then go to T-mobile or Sprint. They are much cheaper and unlimited.
    Oh.. T-mobile site shows unlimited plan -  during congestion the top 3% of data users (>28GB/mo.) may notice reduced speeds until next bill cycle.
    So UNLIMITED has a cap.

    Do you know what UNLIMITED MEANS? Seriously. Some of you are such suckers for big telecom.
    macxpress
  • Reply 22 of 32
    sog35 said:
    How do you use 200GB of data on a cellphone? I guess when you don't do jack all day except Netflix & no chill?
    for many people their phone is their only TV, and they have no wired internet at home

    8 hours of TV/Netflix watching a day can get you to 200GB
    Exactly right.  For example, senior citizens who live in remote areas and have no cable TV service available, or who got the "unlimited" service from verizon and simply don't care to pay the cable pig another $40/month for internet.  They enjoy streaming shows for 8-10 hr/day, and I won't criticize them for it. Neither should you, Pablo.  With luck you'll reach that age some day too.
    edited January 10
  • Reply 23 of 32
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,217member
    linkman said:
    I have no problem with a company putting reasonable caps on data usage. They just need to stop calling it unlimited if it has these restrictions. If they want to call it unlimited then they must own up to the definition:

    unlimited
    [uhn-lim-i-tid] 

    adjective
    1.not limited; unrestricted; unconfined:
    2.boundless; infinite; vast:
    3.without any qualification or exception; unconditional.

    Perhaps someone from Australia can comment on how their truth in advertising laws affect this. I'll bet carriers are more honest there.
    Excellent...now show us in the contract where it said "perpetual" or "lifetime". They aren't placing a cap on those with unlimited plans, they are kicking them off the plan. After the initial term of the contract, usually 12 or 24 months, the contract probably stipulates that the agreement continues until terminated by either party. You can drop Verizon whenever you want without penalty after that initial contract period has expired...and they can drop you. You are being dropped off the unlimited plan. It's your choice whether you agree to a different plan or switch carriers.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 24 of 32
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,217member
    I actually wonder how many people who don't look at their monthly usage have no clue how much data they are using and find out their 10-year old with an iPhone is streaming video all day?

    My wife was driving our out-of-state nieces home one day when I got an alert from Verizon that we were approaching our data limit. We were scratching our heads as to how that happened and realized that she had let them tether their iPads to her iPhone while driving and one of them was streaming video. She had consumed nearly 2 GBs and they were barely out of town.

    On the one hand, very impressive that Verizon delivered that data speed along a rural interstate highway. On the other hand, yikes!, that's a LOT of data getting consumed in a very short amount of time!
  • Reply 25 of 32
    sog35sog35 Posts: 11,610member
    wiggin said:
    linkman said:
    I have no problem with a company putting reasonable caps on data usage. They just need to stop calling it unlimited if it has these restrictions. If they want to call it unlimited then they must own up to the definition:

    unlimited
    [uhn-lim-i-tid] 

    adjective
    1.not limited; unrestricted; unconfined:
    2.boundless; infinite; vast:
    3.without any qualification or exception; unconditional.

    Perhaps someone from Australia can comment on how their truth in advertising laws affect this. I'll bet carriers are more honest there.
    Excellent...now show us in the contract where it said "perpetual" or "lifetime". They aren't placing a cap on those with unlimited plans, they are kicking them off the plan. After the initial term of the contract, usually 12 or 24 months, the contract probably stipulates that the agreement continues until terminated by either party. You can drop Verizon whenever you want without penalty after that initial contract period has expired...and they can drop you. You are being dropped off the unlimited plan. It's your choice whether you agree to a different plan or switch carriers.
    sure they can drop you. But it is very bad business to drop customers because they are using the services you offered from the start.
  • Reply 26 of 32
    sog35sog35 Posts: 11,610member
    wiggin said:
    I actually wonder how many people who don't look at their monthly usage have no clue how much data they are using and find out their 10-year old with an iPhone is streaming video all day?

    My wife was driving our out-of-state nieces home one day when I got an alert from Verizon that we were approaching our data limit. We were scratching our heads as to how that happened and realized that she had let them tether their iPads to her iPhone while driving and one of them was streaming video. She had consumed nearly 2 GBs and they were barely out of town.

    On the one hand, very impressive that Verizon delivered that data speed along a rural interstate highway. On the other hand, yikes!, that's a LOT of data getting consumed in a very short amount of time!
    And probably only cost Verizon 10 cents to deliver those 2 GB's
    tallest skil
  • Reply 27 of 32
    I can understand how someone could use that much if they have no ISP they go though (such as rural areas that don't have access), used their phone as a Wi-Fi hotspot, and then used the internet a lot like my family does. I'm thankful my ISP has no data cap because we stream YouTube, Netflix and other media on multiple devices at the same time as well as online gaming. I wish I didn't have so much time to spend on the internet, but when you're spine is injured to the point of being on disability you suddenly find yourself with a lot of time on your hands. With the technology available now, I don't see how using that much data takes away from anyone else. It's not like the days of dial-up where someone could crash the system with a 2GB email (friend of mine actually almost faced charges for sending 2GB worth of photos in a single email and unintentionally crashing the ISP's entire system for days). Unlimited should be just that as long as it doesn't interfere with anyone else's usage, which these days it shouldn't.
  • Reply 28 of 32
    macxpress said:
    YP101 said:
    There is no unlimited plan available currently in Verizon wireless.

    Verizon just keep the unlimited plan for those people never left or converted.
    Current Verizon wireless plan has only up to 30GB.

    For those unlimited plan holder customer getting 100GB sounds not that bad.

    Used to be that unlimited plan cost was $30 then now paying $59.99.
    Current price for $70, you can only getting 8GB+2GB. 

    Stop complaining.. You still have so called unlimited(but cap on 100GB) plan.

    If you don't like then go to T-mobile or Sprint. They are much cheaper and unlimited.
    Oh.. T-mobile site shows unlimited plan -  during congestion the top 3% of data users (>28GB/mo.) may notice reduced speeds until next bill cycle.
    If there's a cap then its not unlimited. Its either capped at a certain amount or its unlimited. You can't have it both ways. It doesn't make any sense. This is like having the manager of a pizza place tell you that you can only eat four slices of pizza at an all you can eat buffet. Otherwise other people don't get to eat. Its easier to cap others vs just making more pizza and putting it out which is essentially what these carriers are doing. 
    Well, then tell me how much you can eat that pizza buffet?
    Even pizza buffet owner know average person can eat their pizza and still make profit to doing their business.

    Yes. Telecom company make lots of money. I rather they pay me back what I don't use my paid data or unexpired rollover.
    As you can see even T-mobile stated as monthly unlimited cap is 28GB for LTE(or 4G).

    It does not matter cap on or not. The cap(over 100GB per month) is more then enough average person use per month..
    If you spend that much of time on your smart phone(unless you are using to download torrent through your smart phone) then you are addicted smartphone. 
    I am working at home all the time and I turn on 3 smart phones, 1 tablet, 2 laptops and 1 smartTV but can't even use over 70GB per month..

    Most of people think about just mean of word unlimited.
  • Reply 29 of 32
    linkman said:
    I have no problem with a company putting reasonable caps on data usage. They just need to stop calling it unlimited if it has these restrictions. If they want to call it unlimited then they must own up to the definition:
    The problem is that they ARE conforming to the definition, just not the one that sane people would want. The service is unlimited... in time. You may use the data at whatever time of day you want. There are no restrictions on the timing of the usage, and thus you have unlimited time usage. But if they were forced to SAY that in their commercials, they’d be beaten into the ground by PR, because that takes us all the way back to the 1990s and things like “10-10-220” as well as “free calls after 7 PM”. And since the government is responsible for not only the carriers’ behavior but their REFUSAL to expand service and speed, we will never get this to change.

    It’s unlimited in time, but not in speed (or even at the maximum speed for which you pay) or capacity, and thus is technically legal.

    holyone
    said:
    Whoa whoa whoa @sog35 what happened to finding Jesus ?
    Trump made him go back.
    You say this like its a bad thing. WTF is bandwidth for if not to be used?
    Thread’s over. We can go home now.
    sog35 said:
    And probably only cost Verizon 10 cents to deliver those 2 GB's
    That’s another thing I’ve been wondering about recently. We know that texting costs literally $0.00 to keep up, as the data is sent over the always-open carrier wave in the first place. But what’s the real cost of providing other bandwidth to phones on a per-data unit basis? Do we know or have even a general idea?
    edited January 11 teaearlegreyhot
  • Reply 30 of 32
    wiggin said:
    My wife was driving our out-of-state nieces home one day when I got an alert from Verizon that we were approaching our data limit. We were scratching our heads as to how that happened and realized that she had let them tether their iPads to her iPhone while driving and one of them was streaming video. She had consumed nearly 2 GBs and they were barely out of town.
    Yesterday I let my iPhone update two apps (Gasbuddy and Weatherbug) and *poof* it consumed 0.14GB of data.  In the past one week, my (16GB) iPhone 5 has downloaded 0.588GB of app updates (9 downloads).  That by itself is over 2.4 GB/month.  No need to stream, no need to tether your kids iPad.  BUT now consider that your kids iPad might have decided autonomously to download the next version of iOS in the background, while tethered, without your (or your kids) knowledge... there goes another 6 GB of data.  Now you've used over 8 GB of data and have not streamed a single song, let alone any videos.

    The nagging iOS updates that you can't easily block, and the nagging app-updates are really a serious issue.  Again, my iPhone is only a 16 GB model, and I have only a handful of apps installed (39 3rd-party apps). 

    So it's easy to see how a non-streaming user like me can hit 10 to 12 GB per month, as I do.  It is not unreasonable for a user to also stream a couple movies and a few days' worth of songs, given that those are functions BUILT-IN to the iPhone.  200 GB is not so much data over a month. "Unlimited"  MEANS UNLIMITED.
    edited January 11
  • Reply 31 of 32
    Yesterday I let my iPhone update two apps (Gasbuddy and Weatherbug) and *poof* it consumed 0.14GB of data.  In the past one week, my (16GB) iPhone 5 has downloaded 0.588GB of app updates (9 downloads).
    I thought (individual) app updates over 30 MB were blocked on cellular.
  • Reply 32 of 32
    Yesterday I let my iPhone update two apps (Gasbuddy and Weatherbug) and *poof* it consumed 0.14GB of data.  In the past one week, my (16GB) iPhone 5 has downloaded 0.588GB of app updates (9 downloads).
    I thought (individual) app updates over 30 MB were blocked on cellular.
    Auto-updates may be blocked, but I get tired of the nagging red numbers cluttering my update list, so I approved the downloads.  After all, I have no other way to download the updates anyhow.  But they do add up.  Easily to over 2GB/month.  And when my phone is acting as a hotspot for my laptop, the laptop doesn't enquire about data plans... it just assumes any WiFi is free and downloads willy-nilly.

    But yeah, I could disable all cellular downloads.  Or even all cellular data.  I could go back to a wired phone and print newspapers.  But the point I was trying to make is that as Sog35 wrote, unlimited LTE means unlimited, 24/7/365.  And that users of 200GB per month are not necessarily "abusers".  They're just trying to use the product they paid for.

    It's atrocious that MacOS X nags me EVERY SINGLE DAY to update, just because it thinks its on a "free" wifi connection.  iOS on ipads behaves much the same way. Grrr.
    edited January 11
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