One Drop launches Chrome Blood Glucose Monitoring with HealthKit on Apple's online store

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in iPhone
One Drop on Wednesday launched the Chrome Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit on Apple's online store, offering a heavily iOS-based option for people suffering from diabetes.




The centerpiece of the kit is its FDA-certified meter, which transmits data to the One Drop Mobile app via Bluetooth. On top of iPhone and iPod touch support, a companion Apple Watch app is available.

Also bundled are a lancing device, 10 lancets, and 100 test strips. The lancer is said to sit flush against a finger, thanks in part to adjustable depth settings, and require just a small drop of blood, 0.5 microliters. People who want a regular source of test strips can subscribe to a service called One Drop Premium, which costs $39.95 per month or $399.95 per year, and comes with other benefits like a discount on the meter and access to diabetics support.




The Mobile app is also available for Android, but on iOS features both HealthKit and CareKit integration, the latter letting people share data with doctors and caregivers. Using the app centralizes tracking of glucose levels, food, activity, and medication.

On Apple's online store, the Chrome kit costs $99.95. A One Drop Premium subscription lowers this price to $79.95. The iOS app is a free download and runs on iOS 9 or later.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,331member
    I saw a demo of a device that measures blood glucose without requiring blood. It is a device stuck to the upper arm measuring glucose values through the interstitial fluid. In other words when it is fastened onto the skin a tiny and very flexible 'prod' of penetrates the skin and stays there. The advantage is that it lasts for two weeks during which time the device stuck on the arm - approx 1/8" thick and 1" dia, can be scanned unlimited amounts of times for instant read outs. It works with its own small scanner, or Android devices (it uses nfc so no iPhone). The point being that although the device in the article 'looks' good it is old school. For kids in particular, and parents with toddlers who suffer from diabetes, and I am sure for many adult sufferers, finger pricking is invasive, tedious and unsatisfactory. 
    mwhitepulseimages
  • Reply 2 of 12
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 4,651member
    paxman said:
    I saw a demo of a device that measures blood glucose without requiring blood. It is a device stuck to the upper arm measuring glucose values through the interstitial fluid. In other words when it is fastened onto the skin a tiny and very flexible 'prod' of penetrates the skin and stays there. The advantage is that it lasts for two weeks during which time the device stuck on the arm - approx 1/8" thick and 1" dia, can be scanned unlimited amounts of times for instant read outs. It works with its own small scanner, or Android devices (it uses nfc so no iPhone). The point being that although the device in the article 'looks' good it is old school. For kids in particular, and parents with toddlers who suffer from diabetes, and I am sure for many adult sufferers, finger pricking is invasive, tedious and unsatisfactory. 
    The iPhone 6, 6S, and 7 all have NFC.
    edited January 11
  • Reply 3 of 12
    paxman said:
    I saw a demo of a device that measures blood glucose without requiring blood. It is a device stuck to the upper arm measuring glucose values through the interstitial fluid. In other words when it is fastened onto the skin a tiny and very flexible 'prod' of penetrates the skin and stays there. The advantage is that it lasts for two weeks during which time the device stuck on the arm - approx 1/8" thick and 1" dia, can be scanned unlimited amounts of times for instant read outs. It works with its own small scanner, or Android devices (it uses nfc so no iPhone). The point being that although the device in the article 'looks' good it is old school. For kids in particular, and parents with toddlers who suffer from diabetes, and I am sure for many adult sufferers, finger pricking is invasive, tedious and unsatisfactory. 
    I think you saw an Abbot product demonstration. 

    Continuous monitoring systems are the future but expensive. Strange results still need to confirmed with a pin prick and a real blood sample but the less pin pricks the better

    The last time I checked, the Abbot unit could not send alerts while you slept (in case of hipoglucemia). You had to actively scan for the reading.

    If they can figure out a way to alert on hipoglucemia during sleep it would be a great advance.

    Dexcom is another company with good continuous glucose metering. Also expensive though.
    edited January 11
  • Reply 4 of 12
    slurpy said:
    paxman said:
    I saw a demo of a device that measures blood glucose without requiring blood. It is a device stuck to the upper arm measuring glucose values through the interstitial fluid. In other words when it is fastened onto the skin a tiny and very flexible 'prod' of penetrates the skin and stays there. The advantage is that it lasts for two weeks during which time the device stuck on the arm - approx 1/8" thick and 1" dia, can be scanned unlimited amounts of times for instant read outs. It works with its own small scanner, or Android devices (it uses nfc so no iPhone). The point being that although the device in the article 'looks' good it is old school. For kids in particular, and parents with toddlers who suffer from diabetes, and I am sure for many adult sufferers, finger pricking is invasive, tedious and unsatisfactory. 
    The iPhone 6, 6S, and 7 all have NFC.
    Isn't it reserved for Apple Pay? At least on the 6?
    douglas baileypaxman
  • Reply 5 of 12
    slurpy said:
    The iPhone 6, 6S, and 7 all have NFC.
    But who can use it? 

    Only Apple so far.
  • Reply 6 of 12
    It's called the freestyle libre. It's already been hacked so it acts like a CGM. Dexcom is much better and the blood sugars go to the iPhone and Apple Watch. On the newer one you don't need a receiver just the iPhone. You still need to finger stick twice a day though
  • Reply 7 of 12
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,331member
    It's called the freestyle libre. It's already been hacked so it acts like a CGM. Dexcom is much better and the blood sugars go to the iPhone and Apple Watch. On the newer one you don't need a receiver just the iPhone. You still need to finger stick twice a day though
    How does the dexcom unit communicate with the iPhone? That certainly is a good selling point :)

     The freestyle unit lasts for two weeks which is longer than the dexcom, is it not?  From reviews they are very similar in accuracy and the freestyle is less expensive to run, I think. And it is pre calibrated. It is available in the UK, which is why I know of it. I heard from parents who were so happy they could scan their kids at night without waking them up. I also know kids don't like stopping what they are doing and getting their 'kit' out every time they eat. 

    But yeah, once continuous monitoring becomes accurate enough and linked to an insulin pump you have an artificial pancreas. That is pretty neat and will help a lot of people!

    edited January 11
  • Reply 8 of 12
    It's called the freestyle libre. It's already been hacked so it acts like a CGM. Dexcom is much better and the blood sugars go to the iPhone and Apple Watch. On the newer one you don't need a receiver just the iPhone. You still need to finger stick twice a day though
    Do you know if either of them can be programmed to scan and send alerts to the phone and wake you up in case of hipoglucemia while you sleep? 
  • Reply 9 of 12
    avon b7 said:
    It's called the freestyle libre. It's already been hacked so it acts like a CGM. Dexcom is much better and the blood sugars go to the iPhone and Apple Watch. On the newer one you don't need a receiver just the iPhone. You still need to finger stick twice a day though
    Do you know if either of them can be programmed to scan and send alerts to the phone and wake you up in case of hipoglucemia while you sleep? 
    I use the Dexcom G5 (the one that goes directly to the phone and watch). 

    You have a lot of control over alerts so yes, you can have it alert you in the middle of the night for hypoglycemia. In fact the Dexcom app has a setting to override your phone's ringer and volume settings to play alerts at full volume. 

    Dexcom also just just updated its watch app to give you an updating complication with your glucose level and trend arrow, right on your watch face!

    Highly recommended. 
  • Reply 10 of 12
    A subscription is needed to have a regular supply of test strips? So they won't be available in pharmacies?
  • Reply 11 of 12
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 537member
    Dreid1 said:
    avon b7 said:
    It's called the freestyle libre. It's already been hacked so it acts like a CGM. Dexcom is much better and the blood sugars go to the iPhone and Apple Watch. On the newer one you don't need a receiver just the iPhone. You still need to finger stick twice a day though
    Do you know if either of them can be programmed to scan and send alerts to the phone and wake you up in case of hipoglucemia while you sleep? 
    I use the Dexcom G5 (the one that goes directly to the phone and watch). 

    You have a lot of control over alerts so yes, you can have it alert you in the middle of the night for hypoglycemia. In fact the Dexcom app has a setting to override your phone's ringer and volume settings to play alerts at full volume. 

    Dexcom also just just updated its watch app to give you an updating complication with your glucose level and trend arrow, right on your watch face!

    Highly recommended. 
    Thanks! That is excellent news.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    I use the OneTouch Verio Sync for this. Cheaper, test strips common, Bluetooth to iPhone, and integrated with the iOS HealthKit.
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