Apple offers $199.99 Pro Apps Bundle for Education, including Final Cut Pro X, Logic Pro X...

Posted:
in Mac Software
On Friday, Apple rolled out a Pro Apps bundle for educators and students, giving purchasers of the $199 bundle download codes from the Mac App Store for Final Cut Pro X, Logic Pro X, Motion 5, Compressor 4, and MainStage 3.




The deal is available for all faculty and staff at U.S educational institutions all the way from kindergarten through college. College students qualify for the bundle pricing as well.

Combined, the five apps retail for $629.95. Final Cut Pro X itself sells separately for $299.99.

After purchasing the $199.99 Pro Apps Bundle, users receive an email with content codes that can be redeemed on the Mac App Store. Apple notes that codes are usually delivered within one business day but may occasionally take longer.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    That is a heck of a deal!
    irelandmretondowatto_cobraDreid1SpamSandwich
  • Reply 2 of 22
    Unfortunately, I just rebought logic 3 days ago. But this deal makes sense. Often the programs taught in schools are the ones people become most comfortable using. Carrying on to their professional careers and selling more macs
    caliwatto_cobracornchipDreid1
  • Reply 3 of 22
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 2,704member
    Wow that is an awesome deal for anyone in education! Very nice Apple!
    watto_cobracornchip
  • Reply 4 of 22
    calicali Posts: 2,965member
    What a steal!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 22
    appexappex Posts: 510member
    Bring the editing capabilities of QuickTime Player Pro 7.7 into QuickTime Player 10.4.
    avon b7cornchipSpamSandwich
  • Reply 6 of 22
    cambocambo Posts: 37member
    Hope they bring this deal to Canada soon before Trump nukes us!
    irelandMacProwatto_cobraGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 7 of 22
    Why US only? I'd like to see this available in the UK too.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 22
    Can we family share these apps???
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 22
    Unfortunately, I just rebought logic 3 days ago. But this deal makes sense. Often the programs taught in schools are the ones people become most comfortable using. Carrying on to their professional careers and selling more macs
    Contact the MacApp store https://support.apple.com, I bet you can get a refund and then repurchase.
    randominternetpersoncornchip
  • Reply 10 of 22
    NoisenetNoisenet Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    Just a thought here...how is Apple gonna make sure people not affiliated with or attending any school don't fraudulently sign up to this deal? 
  • Reply 11 of 22
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 2,704member
    appex said:
    Bring the editing capabilities of QuickTime Player Pro 7.7 into QuickTime Player 10.4.
    QuickTime? Hahahahaha! Who the hell uses QuickTime anymore???? LOL
  • Reply 12 of 22
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 2,704member
    Noisenet said:
    Just a thought here...how is Apple gonna make sure people not affiliated with or attending any school don't fraudulently sign up to this deal? 
    The same way they check for Educational Mac purchases...they simply don't check if you use the Apple Online Store for education. 
    cornchip
  • Reply 13 of 22
    macxpress said:
    Noisenet said:
    Just a thought here...how is Apple gonna make sure people not affiliated with or attending any school don't fraudulently sign up to this deal? 
    The same way they check for Educational Mac purchases...they simply don't check if you use the Apple Online Store for education. 
    That's exactly what I was going to say.  It's essentially the honor system.  Unlike other programs (like the Adobe CS I believe) they don't even require a .edu email address.  Presumably they could audit accounts and require documentation, but I have no reason to believe they do so.
  • Reply 14 of 22
    They must not care about their pro apps anymore …
  • Reply 15 of 22
    DudemeisterDudemeister Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Yeah, Noisenet, I'm sure they NEVER EVEN THOUGHT OF THAT and of course have NOTHING in place in terms of verification. Bravo, Einstein. Maybe DON'T think next time?
    Noisenet said:
    Just a thought here...how is Apple gonna make sure people not affiliated with or attending any school don't fraudulently sign up to this deal? 
  • Reply 16 of 22
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 13,902moderator
    cornchip said:
    They must not care about their pro apps anymore …
    There are revenue estimates here for what their pro apps make:

    https://www.motionvfx.com/mblog/apple_pro_apps_revenue_analyzed_across_the_years_compared_with_avid_and_adobe,p3524.html

    There are some quotes over the years here with user numbers for Final Cut:

    https://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/72675

    It's around 1-2 million users for FCP. That's overall not yearly, overall Mac users are over 100 million so 1-2% of Mac users. Logic is probably the same - Pro Tools and Cubase are around this level:

    https://www.steinberg.net/en/company/aboutsteinberg.html

    Revenue should be in the low hundreds of millions per year.

    It might actually make more sense for Apple to just bundle their pro apps with the systems and bake the cost into the product. They sell about 25 million Macs every year so $500m revenue would be $20 per user. Then they can consolidate the development teams of their consumer and pro apps. No more Garageband, just Logic; no more iMovie, just Final Cut. FCP is as easy to use as iMovie. Compressor can become a core system framework. They don't have to bundle the whole thing either, they can have in-app purchases for some things if bundling doesn't produce enough revenue.

    Same with their Pages/Numbers etc. Just bundle the apps but features that are only going to be worthwhile to business users can be addons. This way they have a larger addressable audience to market to and every Mac user can benefit from having powerful software when they need to do editing and the education market doesn't have to make a difficult purchasing decision and have to deal with bulk licenses. Bulk IAPs for pro features would be easier to deploy as they can be tied to a business account and those credentials can be entered inside the app.

    It's the free-to-play model for software. Apple has used this for Quicktime licensing. They locked out essential features in that case but they don't have to do it quite like that. Just have upgrade options for certain high-end features and maybe content packs like templates. One thing that's always difficult to deal with is audio like background music. If you have a promotional video/trailer, getting the right audio is a pain. If they had a network-based content browser, they could partner with audio providers and allow buying content with touch id. They can analyze the content being made and recommend appropriate audio. It can cover sound effects and VFX too and they can list how many people are using a track so if you want something more unique you pick one with fewer users rather than the popular ones. They can pass requests for content on to content producers like if a lot of people want a certain kind of music or sound effects that are undersupplied.

    It would also be pretty good if they could partner with online authoring platforms to be able to do synced edit/authoring. Rather than have to do a 'final cut', the edit can be updated. Videos would be split into chunks of say 1 minute and if a change was made to one of the chunks, that part would just be uploaded. A lot of people make gaming videos and they have to split them into chapters manually. Instead they can incrementally add to the edit and have the additions sync to the online version and allow audio changes with just uploading the audio track.
  • Reply 17 of 22
    Again… a deal exclusively available in the US. Way to go… :(
  • Reply 18 of 22
    cambo said:
    Hope they bring this deal to Canada soon before Trump nukes us!
    Off topic and will certainly guarantee this thread gets locked.
  • Reply 19 of 22
    Marvin said:
    cornchip said:
    They must not care about their pro apps anymore …
    There are revenue estimates here for what their pro apps make:

    https://www.motionvfx.com/mblog/apple_pro_apps_revenue_analyzed_across_the_years_compared_with_avid_and_adobe,p3524.html

    There are some quotes over the years here with user numbers for Final Cut:

    https://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/72675

    It's around 1-2 million users for FCP. That's overall not yearly, overall Mac users are over 100 million so 1-2% of Mac users. Logic is probably the same - Pro Tools and Cubase are around this level:

    https://www.steinberg.net/en/company/aboutsteinberg.html

    Revenue should be in the low hundreds of millions per year.

    It might actually make more sense for Apple to just bundle their pro apps with the systems and bake the cost into the product. They sell about 25 million Macs every year so $500m revenue would be $20 per user. Then they can consolidate the development teams of their consumer and pro apps. No more Garageband, just Logic; no more iMovie, just Final Cut. FCP is as easy to use as iMovie. Compressor can become a core system framework. They don't have to bundle the whole thing either, they can have in-app purchases for some things if bundling doesn't produce enough revenue.

    Same with their Pages/Numbers etc. Just bundle the apps but features that are only going to be worthwhile to business users can be addons. This way they have a larger addressable audience to market to and every Mac user can benefit from having powerful software when they need to do editing and the education market doesn't have to make a difficult purchasing decision and have to deal with bulk licenses. Bulk IAPs for pro features would be easier to deploy as they can be tied to a business account and those credentials can be entered inside the app.

    It's the free-to-play model for software. Apple has used this for Quicktime licensing. They locked out essential features in that case but they don't have to do it quite like that. Just have upgrade options for certain high-end features and maybe content packs like templates. One thing that's always difficult to deal with is audio like background music. If you have a promotional video/trailer, getting the right audio is a pain. If they had a network-based content browser, they could partner with audio providers and allow buying content with touch id. They can analyze the content being made and recommend appropriate audio. It can cover sound effects and VFX too and they can list how many people are using a track so if you want something more unique you pick one with fewer users rather than the popular ones. They can pass requests for content on to content producers like if a lot of people want a certain kind of music or sound effects that are undersupplied.

    It would also be pretty good if they could partner with online authoring platforms to be able to do synced edit/authoring. Rather than have to do a 'final cut', the edit can be updated. Videos would be split into chunks of say 1 minute and if a change was made to one of the chunks, that part would just be uploaded. A lot of people make gaming videos and they have to split them into chapters manually. Instead they can incrementally add to the edit and have the additions sync to the online version and allow audio changes with just uploading the audio track.
    No way, Marvin. Although the laundry list of features in Logic far exceeds GarageBand, I've little interest in losing that simplicity when it comes down to ease of use. GarageBand on iOS is even simpler, but GarageBand continues to make the process efficient and fun.
  • Reply 20 of 22
    cambocambo Posts: 37member
    unknwntrr said:
    Again… a deal exclusively available in the US. Way to go… :(
    If you look at the bottom, they are bringing it to other countries, just be patient.

    Cheers,
    Cameron
    spheric
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