Future Apple Watch owners might exchange data with a handshake or fist bump

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 9
An Apple patent application uncovered on Thursday details a method of triggering the automatic exchange of information between two wearables with a simple greeting gesture, like a wave or fist-bump.


Source: USPTO


As published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple's filing for "Gesture-based information exchange between devices in proximity" is a comprehensive application describing a method of facilitating the secure transfer of data between two nearby portable devices, including wearables like Apple Watch, over an ad hoc wireless connection.

According to the document, Apple is proposing a simple, yet intuitive, interface for triggering said transfers. Similar to old-school iOS app Bump, the system works by detecting user gestures, in this case a "greeting event," which then activates a customizable data sharing process.

The backend procedure is expectedly much more sophisticated than "bump-to-send" incarnations, with device context, security and user privacy all taken into consideration.

In some embodiments, two users with wearables -- smartphones are also mentioned as potential candidate devices -- initiate the process with a greeting event. These gestures include any motion that brings one user device in close proximity to another device and incorporates a distinctive movement or acceleration.

Gestures can involve a first user making contact with another user, for example a handshake, high-five, hug, hug with pat on back, fist bump or similar movement. Alternatively, the two users might also activate data transfer operations with a bow, wave or salute.

Transfer gestures can be defined as "natural," meaning movements users of a given culture commonly perform when meeting one another. Other embodiments allow for "artificial" gestures, or movements specified for initiating information sharing operations. For example, a user might perform a handshake with their non-dominant hand, or left hand, when they normally use their right.

In all cases, however, the greeting event must be defined as deliberate and recognizable by sensors onboard a given device. Proximity constraints further reduce false positives, helpful when trading information in crowded spaces.




As for information shared, Apple notes the invention supports any form of digitized data that can be sent across a wireless connection. Contact details, photos, media files, calendar events and more are all fair game. In addition to information stored locally on a wearable device, the method also allows for data to be pulled from a host iPhone or the cloud.

Apple includes a number of safety protocols and filtering schemes to ensure the right information goes to the right people. For example, the process can take into account where a sharing session is initiated -- if a users is at work, only work-related events and contacts are sent to a receiving device.

Aside from sharing data, greeting events can also generate data for sharing across social media networks. In some embodiments, for example, a successful greeting event might invoke a Twitter or Facebook post regarding the meeting of both users.




Perhaps most interesting is Apple's context-based decision making process. The technology automatically determines what information to share and with whom. One example notes users might want to share only social media information with a person they just met, keeping personal data like a home phone number or address private.

Device identifiers, location data, user histories and other deep metrics are required for the system to work correctly. Apple intimates, but does not specifically mention, artificial intelligence as an ideal technology for proceeding through the decision making tree.

Another precautionary measure integrates single-use cryptographic keys which can be tied to a sharing session or a specific gesture. The process might also be only partially automated, meaning users can also elect to share information with another person via an onscreen interface.

Considering the user privacy implications associated with today's invention, it is unlikely that Apple will implement the above described technology anytime soon. A less involved -- and less automated -- solution could conceivably make its way to market, but Apple will first have to build out a database of greeting gestures and, more importantly, a working decision-making AI.

Apple's gesture-based data exchange invention for Apple Watch was first filed for in June 2016 and credits Brent W. Schorsch, David J. Shoemaker, Eugene Dvortsov and Kamlesh Kudchadkar as its inventors.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,126member
    Fist bump!
    how are teenagers affording this gear?

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 26
    Didn't Apple make fun of the fist bump one year at WWDC? If I remember correctly it was when Craig Federighi was announcing AirDrop.
    macxpressrandominternetperson
  • Reply 3 of 26
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 2,716member
    Didn't Apple make fun of the fist bump one year at WWDC? If I remember correctly it was when Craig Federighi was announcing AirDrop.
    Yes...why they just wouldn't use AirDrop is beyond me. AirDrop is so simple to use and it works great. I don't like touching people and shouldn't have to do it to exchange data. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 26
    macxpress said:
    Didn't Apple make fun of the fist bump one year at WWDC? If I remember correctly it was when Craig Federighi was announcing AirDrop.
    Yes...why they just wouldn't use AirDrop is beyond me. AirDrop is so simple to use and it works great. I don't like touching people and shouldn't have to do it to exchange data. 
    I think this patent will be used to defend itself from others who might claim Apple infringed on their patent(s). AirDrop is definitely the way I see Apple devices exchanging data. If I am eventually proven wrong, I think Craig will have fun making fun of himself.
  • Reply 5 of 26
    Wasn't this technology used in Android phones about 6 or 7 years ago?

    Yep, thought so.
    asdasd
  • Reply 6 of 26
    Negroponte demo'd this handshake data exchange a few decades ago.  
  • Reply 7 of 26
    bobroo said:
    Wasn't this technology used in Android phones about 6 or 7 years ago?

    Yep, thought so.
    What version of Android allowed data to be exchanged with a handshake?
    edited February 9 caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 26
    That patent application is culturally sensitive. Middle image clearly two people bowing to one another. Not everyone's up for arbitrary gestures. Mikey's interpretation is very interesting, imo. And for those who say "Android did it first", 1) that's not accurate, and 2) we don't know how this may apply. That they received a patent itself indicates something about its novelty. And there are many steps between patent application and implementation. It may or not play out like how it played out on Android.
  • Reply 9 of 26
    I do remember when MS presented the ‘sharing music’ feature of Zune (Do we remember Zune, the music device that displaced iPods?). You have to do this and that and this and that and… Steve commented: “Wouldn't it be easier to stand up and go and talk to the girl?”
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 26
    The part that's missing is "intent".   Because I bow to you or shake your hand -- or whatever people do in your country -- does not mean that I want to share my information with you.   How does the mobile device know IF I want to share and, if so, WHAT do I want to share?    Yes, location may provide some hints.  But honestly, I am less likely to share information with a business associate at work than with a spouse at home -- or is it the opposite?
  • Reply 11 of 26

    They seem so happy,


    AirDrop is cool.  The first time my wife was exposed to it was when we went to an Escape Room and at the end they took a group picture and AirDropped it to me.  So much easier and better than having her email it to me or use some other method that would give her a permanent connection to me.

  • Reply 12 of 26
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 3,388member
    bobroo said:
    Wasn't this technology used in Android phones about 6 or 7 years ago?

    Yep, thought so.
    What version of Android allowed data to be exchanged with a handshake?

    One of the Android hardware suppliers (not google android software) had a feature which use the NFC chip when two devices tapped each other you could exchange business contact and a few other things. It is kind of like tap to pay. So nothing new hear but this feature is hardly used, most people do airdrop on iphone and a similar feature on android.

    It was a propriety feature not available to all android phone users. Which is typical in the android world, you see all the feature advertised but depending on which hardware platform or android software version you were on would limited which the feature available to a user

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 26
    That is absolutely grea and needed. I will not need to speak "Hello".. We need more of intelligent conversations with electronic devices. Now Siri cannot shut up or understand odd accents and comes with some stupid answers "I will pretend I did not hear this" during business conversation between two foreign nationals. Nice. Very useful.
  • Reply 14 of 26
    bobroo said:
    Wasn't this technology used in Android phones about 6 or 7 years ago?

    Yep, thought so.
    Yes, and proved to be a revolution in inter-device communication. You can barely walk down the street anymore for all Andoid bumping going on! Troll.  
    calimacguiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 26
    Reminds me of the bump app from the earliest app days. This is probably just patent protection, but being fair a bump makes more sense from a wrist worn device with fewer buttons and harder to reach buttons than it ever would with a phone. 
  • Reply 16 of 26
    Oh, hi!  Um, are you .. getting friendly or are you just trying to ... exchange data?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 26
    bobroo said:
    Wasn't this technology used in Android phones about 6 or 7 years ago?

    Yep, thought so.
    Isn't android a complete ripoff of iOS anyway? Yep, thought so. 
    caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 26

    The part that's missing is "intent".   Because I bow to you or shake your hand -- or whatever people do in your country -- does not mean that I want to share my information with you.   How does the mobile device know IF I want to share and, if so, WHAT do I want to share?    Yes, location may provide some hints.  But honestly, I am less likely to share information with a business associate at work than with a spouse at home -- or is it the opposite?
    First off this is one of many, many patents which may never wind up in a product. But second, don't you think Apple would have thought about that? Do you really think they'd release a product that's constantly sending out your personal data to everybody you greet? After all this time, can we still not give them the benefit of the doubt and assume they know what they're doing?
    edited February 9 caliradarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 26
    Jdmr1701Jdmr1701 Posts: 8unconfirmed, member
    The part that's missing is "intent".   Because I bow to you or shake your hand -- or whatever people do in your country -- does not mean that I want to share my information with you.   How does the mobile device know IF I want to share and, if so, WHAT do I want to share?    Yes, location may provide some hints.  But honestly, I am less likely to share information with a business associate at work than with a spouse at home -- or is it the opposite?
    Well AI could handle some of that. Machine Learning has gotten and will get even better in some time. I bet if this is implemented in a future AppleWatch or other device, the user would be able to set what was transferred. If you are going to a business meeting or trade show that is on your calendar then any hand you shake during that time would transfer your business information and contact over. Eliminating the continued use of business cards or at least minimizing them.
  • Reply 20 of 26
    GrypasGrypas Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Patent Troll Apple !!! ;-)
    Android Wear 1.3 with TOGETHER this gesture...and now on Wear 2 ;-)

    http://www.fredzone.org/google-arrete-le-service-together-pour-android-wear-878
Sign In or Register to comment.