Macs and iPhones easier to support and deploy than Windows PCs, enterprise IT survey finds...

Posted:
in Mac OS X edited March 10
Macs and iPhones are easier for IT administrators to deploy to workers than PCs and other smartphone platforms, according to a survey examining the increased adoption of Apple products in enterprise, with the results also indicating that Macs and iOS devices are also perceived as easier to secure and support than alternatives.




Approximately 91 percent of enterprise organizations use Macs, according to a survey by Jamf, a provider of Apple device management software, while 99 percent report the use of iPhones and iPads. The survey also found the amount of Mac and iOS usage growing year-on-year, with 74 percent of organizations reporting increased adoption of Macs for 2016 compared to 2015, with 76 percent seeing increased usage for iOS.

The ability to choose the tools to work with is said to be behind the increased adoption, with 44 percent of surveyed organizations offering employees the choice between a Mac and PC, while a similar option for smartphones is offered 71 percent of the time. Jamf notes another survey querying employees about their computing preferences revealed that the ability to choose hardware is valued, with 80 percent suggesting it should become a standard operating procedure.

In terms of what employees would choose, Jamf turns to IBM, which has steadily deployed Macs to its workforce since 2015 as part of its own employee choice program, and is close to the 100,000 Mac milestone. According to an internal survey, 73 percent of IBM employees want to use a Mac as their next computer for work.

IT administrators also have a better time working with Apple products compared to competitors, thanks to Apple's Device Enrollment Program. In the survey, 62 percent say the Mac is as easy or easier than a PC to deploy to employees, with the figure rising to 93 percent for iPhones and iPads.

The native security tools and Apple's work to protect user data is also welcomed by administrators, with 66 percent claiming it's as easy or easier to maintain a secure environment on a Mac than a PC. When compared to Android and other mobile platforms, 90 percent say it's easier to secure a mobile device running iOS than others.




It is as easy or easier to configure a Mac than a PC, according to 58 percent of respondents, while 91 percent say Apple mobile devices are as easy or easier to configure than those running Android. The result is likely due to Apple's mobile device management framework, built into macOS and iOS and used for configuring common account, network, and permission settings.

Macs are said to be as easy or easier to provide support for compared to PCs, said 63 percent of the sample population, rising to 89 percent for Apple's mobile devices. Software deployment is also as easy or easier on Macs than PCs for 57 percent of the group, 90 percent for iOS compared to other mobile platforms.

This simpler support belief is highlighted in IBM's data, which shows the percentage of support tickets for Mac-related issues lowering over time while Mac deployments increased. IBM also revealed only 5 percent of Mac-derived support tickets warranted personal assistance by support staff, while 27 percent for PC users required a desk-side visit.

While the results of the survey are mostly positive, the knowledge of IT administrators relating to integrating Macs into an existing environment is seen to be lacking. Even though Apple has built Macs to be able to connect to complex Wi-Fi networks and connect to shared drives, and also includes systems to allow them to work with Exchange and Active Directory, only 36 percent of those surveyed are said to "understand the ease of integration with Mac."

By comparison, 79 percent say it's as easy or easier to integrate an iPad or iPhone into an existing environment than another mobile operating system.

"Apple is gaining ground in the enterprise because employees prefer devices they use in their personal lives," Jamf summarizes, adding that the ability to use a device they are comfortable with impacts productivity and job satisfaction. "IT admins are adapting, finding that deployment, device configuration, security, and support are easier with Apple than other operating systems."

Jamf conducted the survey in January 2017 through Dimensional Research. The sample is made up of 300 IT professionals, including managers and executives, from commercial organizations around the world with employee counts ranging from 50 to over 10,000.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
  • Reply 2 of 24
    FatmanFatman Posts: 93member
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
    That reminds me of an old Dilbert cartoon... A company buys all new laptops for employees then locks them all to each  desk - not allowing them to remove from premises.
    rob53Rayz2016StrangeDaysedredroundaboutnowlolliverpscooter63
  • Reply 3 of 24
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,247member
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
    https://www.maclocks.com
  • Reply 4 of 24
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,488member
    Fatman said:
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
    That reminds me of an old Dilbert cartoon... A company buys all new laptops for employees then locks them all to each  desk - not allowing them to remove from premises.
    Love it. As anyone who's ever needed to secure any computer knows, there's no such thing as physically securing it, unless you cast it in a cement block and dump it into the Marianas Trench. The only reasonable way to attempt to secure a computer is to apply the right kind of software security measures, which can include disabling ports (harder to do now when they're all USB-C on the MBP). This will secure data, requiring a major effort to decrypt it even with physical access. I would like to see Apple implement the same kind of full system encryption they have on iOS devices on Macs, including using the Secure Enclave approach. The CIA can do all they want to create ways to break it but the normal user won't be subject to these attacks and will have adequate protection. 

    What bothers me more about this article is the other articles showing schools not caring about security by buying throwaway Chromebooks. I guess the students information and privacy doesn't really matter. I've also read school IT personnel find securing Apple devices difficult. I guess they need to go back to school and learn about the types of device management systems described in this article. 
    magman1979lolliver
  • Reply 5 of 24
    can you run that MDM servers in a VM on non apple hardware?
  • Reply 6 of 24
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,247member
    rob53 said:
    Love it. As anyone who's ever needed to secure any computer knows, there's no such thing as physically securing it
    Yeah those slot type locks are simply a deterrent. If you go to a store like Best Buy you will likely see a more significant means of locking the device with a metal bar across the hinge bolted to the desk. I use a similar custom made version for my iMac and my Original Mac Pro, but the new Mac Pro design does not lend itself to that sort of security method. They do support the Kensington cable which is not as secure.
  • Reply 7 of 24
    can you run that MDM servers in a VM on non apple hardware?
    Yes, you can run Jamf Pro on macOS, Windows, or Linux, physical or virtualized.  They also have a cloud hosting option if you don't want to run the server(s) yourself.
    edited March 7 macxpressroundaboutnow
  • Reply 8 of 24
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 4,703member
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
    Gotta get that negativity into the thread one way or another. Too bad, so sad, Macs suck, right? What’s really too bad is all those wannabe IT losers with their MCSE certificates from the local for-profit “trade” school trying to cling to their jobs by trashing anything but Windows. 
    edited March 7 magman1979macxpressadamcpscooter63watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 9 of 24
    longpathlongpath Posts: 132member
    In other news, water is wet....

    Seriously, there were TCO studies decades ago that showed the same thing. The only people who didn't get the message were either people selling Windows goods and services, support people that wanted to justify their paychecks, or the willfully ignorant/delusional.
    zroger73magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 24
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,822member
    . . .
     
  • Reply 11 of 24
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 1,361member
    IBM pegged the 4-year support savings between $273 - $543 per mac as I recall. Adds up. 
    edited March 7 watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 24
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,822member
    lkrupp said:
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
    Gotta get that negativity into the thread one way or another. Too bad, so sad, Macs suck, right? What’s really too bad is all those wannabe IT losers with their MCSE certificates from the local for-profit “trade” school trying to cling to their jobs by trashing anything but Windows. 
    I don't know his intent, but he has a point. The loss of the Kensington lock or another physical locking alternative does create a limitation for Macs in both corporate and commercial environments.
  • Reply 13 of 24
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,335member
    That "enterprise IT survey" may be new, but that knowledge 
    is good decade or more old...
    (I assume that was also Soli's point?).



    -god I hate autoblunder-
    edited March 7
  • Reply 14 of 24
    xixoxixo Posts: 409member
    It is as easy or easier to configure a Mac than a PC, according to 58 percent of respondents

    it's also easier to configure a tricycle than an airbus A380. what is the context?

    survey by Jamf, a provider of Apple device management software

    Oh! Certainly no bias there. 

    so, 58% of users of an Apple device management software system found it easier to configure a mac than a PC? I'm shocked!

    73 percent of IBM employees want to use a Mac as their next computer for work

    if forced to choose between mac and pc, mac everytime. but, this would be 'my next computer for work' if not for financial, electrical and floor loading limitations:


    edited March 7
  • Reply 15 of 24
    danvmdanvm Posts: 371member
    longpath said:
    In other news, water is wet....

    Seriously, there were TCO studies decades ago that showed the same thing. The only people who didn't get the message were either people selling Windows goods and services, support people that wanted to justify their paychecks, or the willfully ignorant/delusional.
    All companies show how their services and products have the lower TCO, and that includes IBM, HP, Dell, Oracle, Microsoft and Red Hat.  And there is no reason to believe they are lying.  As an example, here is the study where MS show the TCO for Windows 10,

    http://wincom.blob.core.windows.net/documents/Windows 10 TEI Study.pdf

    I would never expect any company to release an study where their product or service fail.  At the same time, business and enterprises have different needs, and there are cases where a product/service is not the best option while in others is the best.  A few months ago, Microsoft announce that the US DoD will upgrade 4 million devices to Windows 10,

    https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/02/17/us-department-of-defense-commits-to-upgrade-4-million-seats-to-windows-10/

    ISo it looks like there are business and enterprises have may have a better TCO with Windows 10 than other solutions, including Macs. 

    xixo
  • Reply 16 of 24
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 4,703member
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
    Gotta get that negativity into the thread one way or another. Too bad, so sad, Macs suck, right? What’s really too bad is all those wannabe IT losers with their MCSE certificates from the local for-profit “trade” school trying to cling to their jobs by trashing anything but Windows. 
    I don't know his intent, but he has a point. The loss of the Kensington lock or another physical locking alternative does create a limitation for Macs in both corporate and commercial environments.
    Then please explain this article. If it’s a limitation and a deal breaker why is the enterprise deploying more Macs? No matter the positive news somebody has to come in and piss on it.
  • Reply 17 of 24
    SoliSoli Posts: 2,822member
    lkrupp said:
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Too bad there is no way to physically secure Apple laptops. The lack of a locking option will probably be a deal breaker in some environments.
    Gotta get that negativity into the thread one way or another. Too bad, so sad, Macs suck, right? What’s really too bad is all those wannabe IT losers with their MCSE certificates from the local for-profit “trade” school trying to cling to their jobs by trashing anything but Windows. 
    I don't know his intent, but he has a point. The loss of the Kensington lock or another physical locking alternative does create a limitation for Macs in both corporate and commercial environments.
    Then please explain this article. If it’s a limitation and a deal breaker why is the enterprise deploying more Macs? No matter the positive news somebody has to come in and piss on it.
    There's nothing to explain. My comment did not imply that it was a deal breaker for every commercial or enterprise scenrio. I merely said it creates a limitation. IOW, not having it is a potential con for certain companies or installations within a company.

    Do you think physical security on a desktop or laptop to be irrelevant for any company in any scenrio?
    edited March 7 randominternetperson
  • Reply 18 of 24
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 2,704member
    danvm said:
    longpath said:
    In other news, water is wet....

    Seriously, there were TCO studies decades ago that showed the same thing. The only people who didn't get the message were either people selling Windows goods and services, support people that wanted to justify their paychecks, or the willfully ignorant/delusional.
    All companies show how their services and products have the lower TCO, and that includes IBM, HP, Dell, Oracle, Microsoft and Red Hat.  And there is no reason to believe they are lying.  As an example, here is the study where MS show the TCO for Windows 10,

    http://wincom.blob.core.windows.net/documents/Windows 10 TEI Study.pdf

    I would never expect any company to release an study where their product or service fail.  At the same time, business and enterprises have different needs, and there are cases where a product/service is not the best option while in others is the best.  A few months ago, Microsoft announce that the US DoD will upgrade 4 million devices to Windows 10,

    https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/02/17/us-department-of-defense-commits-to-upgrade-4-million-seats-to-windows-10/

    ISo it looks like there are business and enterprises have may have a better TCO with Windows 10 than other solutions, including Macs. 

    As a person who supports both Windows PC's and iOS devices and macOS devices I will say that it is far easier to implement and support Apple devices than Windows devices. JAMF Pro alone is so much more intuitive to use vs SCCM. SCCM is typical Microsoft clunkiness. Just creating a simple query is a mess in SCCM where as in JAMF Pro its a breeze and takes literally 5 minutes or less to do and test. You can have iPads or Macs all setup and ready to go before the iPads even get to your door because of how both Apple's DEP (Device Enrollment Program) and how MDM's tie into Apple's systems. All you have to do is take them out of the box, turn them on and connect to a network and as you run through the initial setup they'll start configuring themselves automagically. This isn't anywhere near as easy with Windows's PCs. No even close! 
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 19 of 24
    longpathlongpath Posts: 132member
    danvm said:
    longpath said:
    In other news, water is wet....

    Seriously, there were TCO studies decades ago that showed the same thing. The only people who didn't get the message were either people selling Windows goods and services, support people that wanted to justify their paychecks, or the willfully ignorant/delusional.
    All companies show how their services and products have the lower TCO, and that includes IBM, HP, Dell, Oracle, Microsoft and Red Hat.  And there is no reason to believe they are lying.  As an example, here is the study where MS show the TCO for Windows 10,

    http://wincom.blob.core.windows.net/documents/Windows 10 TEI Study.pdf

    I would never expect any company to release an study where their product or service fail.  At the same time, business and enterprises have different needs, and there are cases where a product/service is not the best option while in others is the best.  A few months ago, Microsoft announce that the US DoD will upgrade 4 million devices to Windows 10,

    https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/02/17/us-department-of-defense-commits-to-upgrade-4-million-seats-to-windows-10/

    ISo it looks like there are business and enterprises have may have a better TCO with Windows 10 than other solutions, including Macs. 

    The studies I referred to were not Apple studies, nor were they commissioned by Apple. These were not studies showing that the products and services of the author or funding party of the studies was better, as you assert. They were from 3rd parties like Gartner Group, which is hardly known for a pro-Apple bias.
    edited March 7
  • Reply 20 of 24
    danvmdanvm Posts: 371member
    macxpress said:
    danvm said:
    longpath said:
    In other news, water is wet....

    Seriously, there were TCO studies decades ago that showed the same thing. The only people who didn't get the message were either people selling Windows goods and services, support people that wanted to justify their paychecks, or the willfully ignorant/delusional.
    All companies show how their services and products have the lower TCO, and that includes IBM, HP, Dell, Oracle, Microsoft and Red Hat.  And there is no reason to believe they are lying.  As an example, here is the study where MS show the TCO for Windows 10,

    http://wincom.blob.core.windows.net/documents/Windows 10 TEI Study.pdf

    I would never expect any company to release an study where their product or service fail.  At the same time, business and enterprises have different needs, and there are cases where a product/service is not the best option while in others is the best.  A few months ago, Microsoft announce that the US DoD will upgrade 4 million devices to Windows 10,

    https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/02/17/us-department-of-defense-commits-to-upgrade-4-million-seats-to-windows-10/

    ISo it looks like there are business and enterprises have may have a better TCO with Windows 10 than other solutions, including Macs. 

    As a person who supports both Windows PC's and iOS devices and macOS devices I will say that it is far easier to implement and support Apple devices than Windows devices. JAMF Pro alone is so much more intuitive to use vs SCCM. SCCM is typical Microsoft clunkiness. Just creating a simple query is a mess in SCCM where as in JAMF Pro its a breeze and takes literally 5 minutes or less to do and test.
    I suppose that SCCM is not perfect.  But still a powerful tool that's being used by many large business and enterprises.  Gartner had Microsoft as a leader in client management tools, even over IBM, Symantec and other companies. 

    http://www.creekpointe.com/pdfs/LANDesk Magic Quadrant for Client Management Tools.pdf

    This whitepaper was from 2014, and from what I read, 2015 had the same results.  This was the last year Gartner had the Client Management Tools category.  If you read the article, it says that MS has the largest market share.  Maybe can't do a query as elegant as Jamf (at least in your opinion), but it has to do something right to be the leader in the quadrant and marketshare, don't you think?

    You can have iPads or Macs all setup and ready to go before the iPads even get to your door because of how both Apple's DEP (Device Enrollment Program) and how MDM's tie into Apple's systems. All you have to do is take them out of the box, turn them on and connect to a network and as you run through the initial setup they'll start configuring themselves automagically. This isn't anywhere near as easy with Windows's PCs. No even close!
    Personally, I configure my customer devices with Group Policy, and it's very easy.  One of the benefits is that the policy applies to every Windows device, that could be a 2-in-1, tablet/Surface, notebook, PC and/or remote desktop/VDI client.  And the device is ready as soon as the user login.  As today, the policy settings list for Windows Server is +4000 lines, so I suppose you'll find everything you need to manage in that list. 

    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=25250


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