Adobe updates Illustrator CC and InDesign CC with new features

Posted:
in Mac Software
Adobe on Thursday issued updates for Illustrator CC, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary, and InDesign CC, introducing new features and user interface improvements to the professional design software.




Announced through Adobe's official blog, Illustrator CC takes a cue from users by incorporating a number of highly requested features like straightforward image cropping, a function previously accomplished by offloading documents to other apps.

With Image Crop, Illustrator CC users now have the ability to immediately crop images placed into a document with intuitive crop handles. Much like cropping tools offered in other Adobe products, including the flagship Photoshop CC, Image Crop in Illustrator CC comes with measurement tools and a familiar dotted bounding line.

In addition to inline image edits, Image Crop automatically discards unused image data to reduce file sizes and improve overall performance.

Aside from the new cropping option, Illustrator CC introduces a Color Themes Panel for creating, exploring and saving color themes for later use. The panel UI also extends to other Adobe apps, offering users consistency across various platforms. For example, themes can be generated from pictures taken with the Adobe Capture mobile app, which are then pushed to Illustrator through Adobe's cloud.

As for InDesign CC, the document layout software received a new UI that lets users jump between Adobe apps and flagship cloud features. A redesigned New Document Panel is included for quickly starting new projects with document presets and recent document settings.

Further embedding Adobe CC elements into the main app is integration with templates from Adobe Stock, which can be accessed via the New Document Panel.

Adobe's Creative Cloud plans start at $19.99 per month for single apps like Illustrator CC, while access to all CC apps comes in at $49.99 per month.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    I wish —but I do not have any hope— that they heal ‘in place’ and in ‘Story Editor’ editing. When you are editing text in the main window, and you change columns, by example, the cursor appear in the far side, showing just one or two letters. My desired way would be that you alway have the cursor with the text column in sight and in the middle of the page. The ‘Story Editor’ still have a bunch of bugs and memory leaks that came from CS3 o CS4. After long editings something happens and ‘automatically’ selects all the text, or the advance cursor key fails to work, and jumps to the start. Close and open and you have some time to work. Also, they took out the three-clicd to select the paragraphs in the Story Editor (it works in main page). As for the article, it seems that the ‘most requested users features’ is integration with CC. I just hope I get a better application. I'll wait a couple of days to update.
  • Reply 2 of 22
    I'm cool with some of the overdue new features. 

    But it stop freaking messing with the UI every other update. You guys are killing my productivity. 
    EsquireCatsstevenoz
  • Reply 3 of 22
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 564member
    It's nice that Adobe drops feature upgrades every few months these days.

    funny how motivated they are to keep innovating when they want you to keep paying every month.
    ajl
  • Reply 4 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 26,168member
    I kept my CS5 suite and refuse to "upgrade" to this rentware lunacy.
    EsquireCatsfotoformatking editor the gratebdkennedystevenozjdw
  • Reply 5 of 22
    slprescottslprescott Posts: 646member
    I recently learned Illustrator as a side activity to game development.  While it's a great tool, the subscription model of about $250 every year is hard to justify for an occasional artist. Freeware alternatives like Inkscape can often suffice.
    EsquireCats
  • Reply 6 of 22
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 1,277member
    I recently learned Illustrator as a side activity to game development.  While it's a great tool, the subscription model of about $250 every year is hard to justify for an occasional artist. Freeware alternatives like Inkscape can often suffice.
    Try Affinity Designer. It's very reasonably priced (CAD$69.99, so about USD$52-ish), and in my opinion more intuitive and in many ways better than Illustrator.

    Although I like Illustrator, I, like you, got tired of feeding the Adobe monster every month for something I only use every couple of months. I got Affinity as a way to ease my withdrawal but it turns out it's so good I haven't missed Illustrator at all.

    You can buy it on the App Store. There's a link to a free trial at the bottom of the product page on their web site: https://affinity.serif.com/en-gb/designer/
    ajlfotoformatstevenozjdw
  • Reply 7 of 22
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 1,277member

    I kept my CS5 suite and refuse to "upgrade" to this rentware lunacy.
    I know the feeling, and I'd love to tell you that you're not missing anything, but I was surprised by how much better the CC version of Illustrator is compared to CS5. It's been about a year since I cancelled my subscription and went to Affinity (see my previous post) so I no longer remember exactly what all the improvements were off the top of my head, but I do remember that node handles are MUCH better and layer handling was more intuitive. If you use it a lot, you may find the new version more enjoyable to work with.

    You may also want to check out Affinity Designer. I'm surprised by how good it is.
    jdw
  • Reply 8 of 22
    One day they'll fix the gradient tool, or vector handles needing pixel-perfect clicking, or defaulting to rotate instead of resize when pulling anchors, or the absurdly long wait time to get to tool alternatives in toolbars, or the general pixel-sized hot areas for things like transform corners... *runs out of breath and dies*
  • Reply 9 of 22
    ajlajl Posts: 50member
    One day they'll fix the gradient tool, or vector handles needing pixel-perfect clicking, or defaulting to rotate instead of resize when pulling anchors, or the absurdly long wait time to get to tool alternatives in toolbars, or the general pixel-sized hot areas for things like transform corners... *runs out of breath and dies*
    And one day they'll fix the way InDesign handles tables, such as the lack, inside the table style options, of a selection for a cell style for the very first cell where column and thread crosses each one, or the lack, in the cell and/or table style, of a height measure option, and maybe they'll add the ability to select and even evidence parts of text related to a determined character or paragraph style (like – surprisingly – Word does) instead of using workarounds with GREP functionality... I agree with Polymnia: funny how motivated they are to keep innovating when they want you to keep paying every month – Maybe Adobe will fix or add new features one per time just to keeping people paying every month.
  • Reply 10 of 22
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 564member
    I kept my CS5 suite and refuse to "upgrade" to this rentware lunacy.
    Right?

    what am I thinking, paying for software I use everyday and getting regular feature upgrades. 

    I should really get therapy.
  • Reply 11 of 22
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 564member
    ajl said:
    One day they'll fix the gradient tool, or vector handles needing pixel-perfect clicking, or defaulting to rotate instead of resize when pulling anchors, or the absurdly long wait time to get to tool alternatives in toolbars, or the general pixel-sized hot areas for things like transform corners... *runs out of breath and dies*
    And one day they'll fix the way InDesign handles tables, such as the lack, inside the table style options, of a selection for a cell style for the very first cell where column and thread crosses each one, or the lack, in the cell and/or table style, of a height measure option, and maybe they'll add the ability to select and even evidence parts of text related to a determined character or paragraph style (like – surprisingly – Word does) instead of using workarounds with GREP functionality... I agree with Polymnia: funny how motivated they are to keep innovating when they want you to keep paying every month – Maybe Adobe will fix or add new features one per time just to keeping people paying every month.
    I'll take it. Better than being stuck with CS5. How often are features added to that application?
  • Reply 12 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 26,168member

    I kept my CS5 suite and refuse to "upgrade" to this rentware lunacy.
    I know the feeling, and I'd love to tell you that you're not missing anything, but I was surprised by how much better the CC version of Illustrator is compared to CS5. It's been about a year since I cancelled my subscription and went to Affinity (see my previous post) so I no longer remember exactly what all the improvements were off the top of my head, but I do remember that node handles are MUCH better and layer handling was more intuitive. If you use it a lot, you may find the new version more enjoyable to work with.

    You may also want to check out Affinity Designer. I'm surprised by how good it is.
    Thanks for the Affinity Designer recommendation. I'll check it out. 

    You have to realize something though, I've used Illustrator ever since (unless I'm misremembering) version 2 or 3, back in the early 90s, so I'm very used to the workflow and toolset.
  • Reply 13 of 22
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 1,277member

    I kept my CS5 suite and refuse to "upgrade" to this rentware lunacy.
    I know the feeling, and I'd love to tell you that you're not missing anything, but I was surprised by how much better the CC version of Illustrator is compared to CS5. It's been about a year since I cancelled my subscription and went to Affinity (see my previous post) so I no longer remember exactly what all the improvements were off the top of my head, but I do remember that node handles are MUCH better and layer handling was more intuitive. If you use it a lot, you may find the new version more enjoyable to work with.

    You may also want to check out Affinity Designer. I'm surprised by how good it is.
    Thanks for the Affinity Designer recommendation. I'll check it out. 

    You have to realize something though, I've used Illustrator ever since (unless I'm misremembering) version 2 or 3, back in the early 90s, so I'm very used to the workflow and toolset.
    Me, too, though not quite as long in my case. I started with CS3.

    I found that the new version didn't require learning new working methods or tools per se, just that the existing ones worked much better. I'm not an Illustrator power user though, my uses of it were fairly basic. Mostly hand tracing bitmapped logos to create vector versions. That's node-handle intensive though, which is where I really felt the improvement in CC.

    Obviously I didn't love it enough to keep paying though! Affinity is suiting me just fine now.
    edited April 7 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 14 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,247member
    polymnia said:
    I kept my CS5 suite and refuse to "upgrade" to this rentware lunacy.
    Right?

    what am I thinking, paying for software I use everyday and getting regular feature upgrades. 

    I should really get therapy.
    And a full-time graphic designer with some skills can make tons of money with CC. Pays 100% of my bills with plenty to spare.
    wlym
  • Reply 15 of 22
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 41,324member
    The panel UI also extends to other Adobe apps, offering users consistency across various platforms.
    Oh, good, consistency was mentioned. Now my rant about how Adobe has no fucking balls will be justified. Adobe has no fucking balls. (echo, echo…) They’ve added new features to the software obtained through the companies they’ve purchased, but that’s about it. They’ve made no effort to unify the UI or UX of them. Yes, I know that many people individually don’t use the full range of their software. Yes, I know that they’ll be upset about the changes initially. But come the fuck on. I shouldn’t have to remember that the lasso tool (pencil, pen, full select cursor, direct select cursor, shape tool, paint bucket, etc. etc. et-fucking-cetera) use different keys across applications by the same company. PITA, and not the flatbread.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 16 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 26,168member
    The panel UI also extends to other Adobe apps, offering users consistency across various platforms.
    ...PITA, and not the flatbread.
    Ha!
  • Reply 17 of 22
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 564member
    volcan said:
    polymnia said:
    I kept my CS5 suite and refuse to "upgrade" to this rentware lunacy.
    Right?

    what am I thinking, paying for software I use everyday and getting regular feature upgrades. 

    I should really get therapy.
    And a full-time graphic designer with some skills can make tons of money with CC. Pays 100% of my bills with plenty to spare.
    Mine too. 
  • Reply 18 of 22
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 564member
    The panel UI also extends to other Adobe apps, offering users consistency across various platforms.
    Oh, good, consistency was mentioned. Now my rant about how Adobe has no fucking balls will be justified. Adobe has no fucking balls. (echo, echo…) They’ve added new features to the software obtained through the companies they’ve purchased, but that’s about it. They’ve made no effort to unify the UI or UX of them. Yes, I know that many people individually don’t use the full range of their software. Yes, I know that they’ll be upset about the changes initially. But come the fuck on. I shouldn’t have to remember that the lasso tool (pencil, pen, full select cursor, direct select cursor, shape tool, paint bucket, etc. etc. et-fucking-cetera) use different keys across applications by the same company. PITA, and not the flatbread.
    Someone with the grit and tenacity to post 41,000 times on AI can probably spend some time configuring his keyboard shortcuts the way he wants to. 

    Or maybe you don't have the balls for it?
  • Reply 19 of 22
    Now, now SpamSandwich and Polymnia. Stop – you're both right. Like SS, I am using a pre-subscription suite (CS6) because I won't be adopting Adobe's subscription model. I find it unreasonable, though not unlike Adobe's other ways of strong-arming users into upgrading before they'd like to. There's a reason Adobe has shifted to subscription software, and to think it has to do with anything beyond $$$ is naive. Polymnia uses the software every day and I'd bet he either writes off the expense on his taxes or his company pays for the subscription. So the little guy is being squeezed, whether he pays for the subscription or decides to abandon Adobe. Since I don't hand off files anymore, I'm in the latter group. Too bad, Adobe, because you will be losing a customer who has been with you since Illustrator 3. And I know you couldn't care less.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 20 of 22
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 564member
    MicDorsey said:
    Now, now SpamSandwich and Polymnia. Stop – you're both right. Like SS, I am using a pre-subscription suite (CS6) because I won't be adopting Adobe's subscription model. I find it unreasonable, though not unlike Adobe's other ways of strong-arming users into upgrading before they'd like to. There's a reason Adobe has shifted to subscription software, and to think it has to do with anything beyond $$$ is naive. Polymnia uses the software every day and I'd bet he either writes off the expense on his taxes or his company pays for the subscription. So the little guy is being squeezed, whether he pays for the subscription or decides to abandon Adobe. Since I don't hand off files anymore, I'm in the latter group. Too bad, Adobe, because you will be losing a customer who has been with you since Illustrator 3. And I know you couldn't care less.
    I both write it off on my taxes and my company pays for the software since I work for my own company. 

    I understand being bummed, but on the flip side, your CS-whatever license will work forever. Eventually you'll need a dedicated Mac to run legacy MacOS, but if it's important to you and you're unable/unwilling to join the current license model, that's what you need to do. 

    I don't work for free. I expect ongoing payment for ongoing work. I can't fault Adobe for following the same model. 

    Software, especially cloud software is a service. The fact that it was initially marketed as a tangible product is going to go down as a historical footnote. 

    When software is is treated as a service it generally gets better. 

    Adobe, Microsoft are good examples.

    even if you hate the licensing model, the software has objectively improved functionally since the change. 

    Hell, even my hosted time tracking software (Harvest) is light years beyond the old perpetual licensed tracking app I used to use. 
Sign In or Register to comment.