First Google Android phone spotting reveals bulky iPhone rival

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
The first smartphone based on Google's Android mobile platform could hit the U.S. market as early as October, according to new reports, but a video of the handset leaked on the Internet reveals a device which lacks the elegance that's already drawn millions to Apple's iPhone.



People briefed on the search giant's plans tell the New York Times that the HTC-manufacturered handset, know amongst Internet circles as the "Dream," will go on sale by the holidays -- possibly even earlier depending on how long it takes the Federal Communications Commission to weigh in with approval.



It's expected to be the only Android phone available in the U.S. this year and will be sold exclusively through T-Mobile, the nation?s No. 4 wireless carrier. A video (below) of the supposed device making the rounds on the Internet is said to match the one seen by the Times' sources, confirming its authenticity.



Like the iPhone, the Dream has a full touch-screen and will be able to run a slew of applications written by third-party developers for the open-source Android operating system. Conversely, it will also feature a physical "full five-row keyboard" that's exposed by sliding the display component upwards, mimicking the functionality of T-Mobile's Sidekick handset.



While the Dream is "apparently a hot item to show off in Google's cafeterias these days," those familiar with the device describe it as "big and bulky," and nowhere near as sleek as iPhone that's forever altered the landscape of the mobile industry. The Android software itself is similarly not up to par with standards set by Apple, leaving it feeling "less-elegant, less-user-friendly" just months before its slated to be unleashed into the wild.



Still, the Dream is just one of "several devices" Google is testing with its new mobile software, offering hope that other smartphone makers will be able to compensate for the inadequacies of the initial HTC handset when they begin rolling out their Android phones sometime next year. The more pressing issue appears to be whether Google is adequately prepared to provide its ring of developers with the support and expertise they need to go head-to-head with an already thriving fleet of software makers that have hitched onto Apple's mobile platform.







Some early Android supporters have already expressed frustration with the company for favoring a small subset of developers with advance releases of Android's Software Developer Kit, exposing them to newer features and bug fixes ahead of the general community. Meanwhile, those carriers and hardware manufacturers that do have access to the latest Android codebase haven't experienced a clear path to success either.



Among their complaints have been language translation problems with software and an overall lack of support from Google, whose emphasis on the anticipated launch of the Dream through T-Mobile has crowded out other carrier's attempts to get help launching their own array of Android devices.

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Comments

  • SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 24,148member
    Given that Android is only in its first iteration, I'm not too concerned with limited functionality or other such growing pains... give it some time, kids.
  • irelandireland Posts: 15,253member
    Darth Vadar.
  • deepdeep Posts: 13member
    I'm so creeped out by the heavy breathing
  • gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Given that Android is only in its first iteration, I'm not too concerned with limited functionality or other such growing pains... give it some time, kids.



    That's what Gates said about Windows.

    These guys can't come up with anything more 21st century than f***ing desktop folder icons?
  • gqbgqb Posts: 1,934member
    duplicate.
  • moo083moo083 Posts: 10member
    I love Google and everything, but when comparing Apple and Google, you have to keep in mind that Google has never released a consumer grade OS to the masses before and Apple has done it time and time again. As much as I like Google, they are not an OS company. So while I will keep an Android ear open, I'm not expecting to seriously compete with the iPhone. It might compete well with Windows Mobile. Anything is better than that crap.
  • dimmokdimmok Posts: 359member
    Bring it on.....



    We will bury these cockroaches.....
  • technohermittechnohermit Posts: 564member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by moo083 View Post


    I love Google and everything, but when comparing Apple and Google, you have to keep in mind that Google has never released a consumer grade OS to the masses before and Apple has done it time and time again. As much as I like Google, they are not an OS company. So while I will keep an Android ear open, I'm not expecting to seriously compete with the iPhone. It might compete well with Windows Mobile. Anything is better than that crap.



    Maybe it will have 22nd century features, like cut copy and paste.
  • wizard69wizard69 Posts: 11,470member
    Looks like I'm not the only one that thought Darth Vader was invoked in this video LOL.



    On the serious side that video was just about useless on the iPhone.



    Interestingly I'm not opposed to a physical keyboard on such devices. It is just that I don't see how youbcan keep the size of the phone under control. If apple comes out with a larger iPod Touch a slide out keyboard might work well on it. Or maybe a slide out screen that can cover for a keyboard. I just don't see current tech making such possible in a phone the size of iPhone.



    Dave
  • virgil-tb2virgil-tb2 Posts: 1,416member
    Good article but do you have to drag out this troll every single time an article about Android is in the offing?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    ... Some early Android supporters have already expressed frustration with the company for favoring a small subset of developers with advance releases of Android's Software Developer Kit...



    *Some* die-hard OSS evangelists are upset over this, but it's simply not the gigantic issue it's being made out to be and doesn't deserve to be repeated ad nauseam in every single article about the subject. It's also inaccurate in the way you report it.



    Additionally, it's very, very interesting that Googles (debatable but definitely valid) response to this criticism is never mentioned in the same articles. Google's known position is that they are taking a well-known and in some circles respected approach to OS development, by trying to prototype the basics of Android somewhat privately, before the code is released in full to the OS community. You may disagree with this, but it's a valid choice to make. Others make it, Google made it, and to describe what they are doing as "favouring" particular OS developers is disingenuous to say the least.



    I understand that sites like this are heavily biased towards the developer community, but a little objective reporting isn't going to hurt anyone. If you are going to include this canard in every single article on Android, at least have the decency to cover both sides of the issue in full.



    You are putting words in Googles "mouth" here that were never said and attributing actions to Google that they never performed.
  • boogabooga Posts: 1,070member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Virgil-TB2 View Post


    Good article but do you have to drag out this troll every single time an article about Android is in the offing?





    *Some* die-hard OSS evangelists are upset over this, but it's simply not the gigantic issue it's being made out to be and doesn't deserve to be repeated ad nauseam in every single article about the subject. It's also inaccurate in the way you report it.



    Additionally, it's very, very interesting that Googles (debatable but definitely valid) response to this criticism is never mentioned in the same articles. Google's known position is that they are taking a well-known and in some circles respected approach to OS development, by trying to prototype the basics of Android somewhat privately, before the code is released in full to the OS community. You may disagree with this, but it's a valid choice to make. Others make it, Google made it, and to describe what they are doing as "favouring" particular OS developers is disingenuous to say the least.



    I understand that sites like this are heavily biased towards the developer community, but a little objective reporting isn't going to hurt anyone. If you are going to include this canard in every single article on Android, at least have the decency to cover both sides of the issue in full.



    You are putting words in Googles "mouth" here that were never said and attributing actions to Google that they never performed.



    Some good criticism... besides, there are plenty of other things developers are hating about Android, from all published reports. Such as that it's a LOT harder to do some of the things that are easy with the iPhone SDK on the Android SDK. Apple not only benefits from decades of OS experience, they also already had an entire development library and toolchain avaialble that they just had to augment for the iPhone.
  • echosonicechosonic Posts: 440member
    The Google phone wil be as well-received as a fart in church. Watch.
  • ekeefe41ekeefe41 Posts: 36member


    Here is what i believe; it is based on nothing more than my opinion.



    The iPhone is a revolutionary new product.

    So were the 1st GUI-based Macs.



    The iPhone is tightly controlled by Apple.

    So were the 1st GUI-Macs.



    The iPhone will fail the same way the original Macs did because of the tight hardware/software control. People will stop looking at their cell phones as "phones" and see them for what they are... mini computers. Once people get a feel for a 'mini computer cell phone' that they can customize any way they like only having to pay for the data/voice plan. This market will be flipped on its head.



    Apple is once again starting this tech revolution, but there game plan looks to be the same to me. They did lose the PC war you know.


     


     


    Edit: 2012


    I was right, lololol


    http://www.zdnet.com/android-really-is-the-new-windows-7000007450/

  • tenobelltenobell Posts: 7,014member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ekeefe41 View Post


    Here is what i believe, it is based on nothing more than my opinion.



    The iphone is a revolutionary new product.

    So were the 1st gui based mac's



    The Iphone is tightly controlled by Apple

    So were the 1st gui mac's



    The Iphone will fail the same way the original mac's did because of the tight hardware/software control. People will stop looking at their cell phones as "phones" and see them for what they are... Mini computers. Once people get a feel for a 'mini computer cell phone' that they can customize any way they like only having to pay for the data/voice plan. This market will be flipped on it's head.



    Apple is once again starting this tech revolution, but there game plan looks to be the same to me. They did loose the PC war you know.



    This whole thesis is completely wrong simply based on the fact that the Macintosh is still tightly controlled by Apple. The Macintosh is currently growing faster than the entire Windows market.



    The original Macs did not fail. How exactly are you gauging success or failure? Apple as a company lost direction because of poor management, not because of its business model.



    Apple did not really start the mobile phone as a "mini computer". They simply have done it better.
  • teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    That thing looks like the bastard child of an iPhone bred with a Sidekick!
  • mr macintoshmr macintosh Posts: 26member
    Looks like something thrown together real quickly. I noticed from the video that the screen is not very responsive. I hope this is due to the touch screen and not the app. Maybe in a few years they will have a more polished app than what was just shown cause I would not even give that a second look...



  • ekeefe41ekeefe41 Posts: 36member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TenoBell View Post


    This whole thesis is completely wrong simply based on the fact that the Macintosh is still tightly controlled by Apple. The Macintosh is currently growing faster than the entire Windows market.



    The original Macs did not fail. How exactly are you gauging success or failure? Apple as a company lost direction because of poor management, not because of its business model.



    Apple did not really start the mobile phone as a "mini computer". They simply have done it better.



    What is Apple's market share in the PC market again???



    6.1%



    They lost the PC war, get over it. I don't want to derail this in to a apple/windows conversation. My point is there business plan looks strikingly familiar to the old PC business plan. I also thing the company that takes the lead in the cell phone OS market will be the next "windows" (business wise that is)
  • capnbobcapnbob Posts: 375member
    ekeefe41 - tenobell nailed it, but just to add... people will consider their cell phone a mini computer, and for most users, they will just want it to work and do what they need it to do (which is not a very high bar).

    Geeks may want to open their phone up and add flux capacitors but most (a much larger global user base than PCs) want it to do the basic job they need it to do - phone, surf, media, few cool apps etc.

    The history of the PC wars is not relevant. Apple had many opportunities to win and screwed the pooch every time. Apple may have run aground in the past but it is now on the crest of the wave in delivering that market-driven model in the iPhone and pretty well in the Mac too.
  • ekeefe41ekeefe41 Posts: 36member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Capnbob View Post


    ekeefe41 - tenobell nailed it, but just to add... people will consider their cell phone a mini computer, and for most users, they will just want it to work and do what they need it to do (which is not a very high bar).

    Geeks may want to open their phone up and add flux capacitors but most (a much larger global user base than PCs) want it to do the basic job they need it to do - phone, surf, media, few cool apps etc.

    The history of the PC wars is not relevant. Apple had many opportunities to win and screwed the pooch every time. Apple may have run aground in the past but it is now on the crest of the wave in delivering that market-driven model in the iPhone and pretty well in the Mac too.



    I think your being short sighted..

    Think about the computing power of an iphone.



    Now try to imagine what phones the same size of the iphone will be able to do in 5 years.



    I think people's phones will replace there computers for social networking email chating.... who knows what else. There will be a "Killer app" to make everyone to use there phone as a computer. It just hasn't been made yet.



    I could be all wrong, it's just ideas floating around in my head.
  • boogabooga Posts: 1,070member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ekeefe41 View Post


    Here is what i believe, it is based on nothing more than my opinion.



    The iphone is a revolutionary new product.

    So were the 1st gui based mac's



    The Iphone is tightly controlled by Apple

    So were the 1st gui mac's



    The Iphone will fail the same way the original mac's did because of the tight hardware/software control. People will stop looking at their cell phones as "phones" and see them for what they are... Mini computers. Once people get a feel for a 'mini computer cell phone' that they can customize any way they like only having to pay for the data/voice plan. This market will be flipped on it's head.



    Apple is once again starting this tech revolution, but there game plan looks to be the same to me. They did loose the PC war you know.



    This is the conventional wisdom, but personally I don't think that's why Windows became ubiquitous over MacOS. DOS/Windows was cheaper, was more directly applicable to the folks spending the money (mostly just businesses in the 80's), and once the hardware platform was established ran on existing hardware.



    None of that is applicable here. In fact, considering the installed base of existing iPhones, the new subsidized price, and the applicability to both business and home users (who are spending a lot more than they did in the 80's), I'd say the iPhone has all the advantages over Android this time.



    If anything, RIM's the one to watch here. The corporate world is theirs to lose right now and they're starting to put feelers out into the consumer space. I don't see Android being very relevant.
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