Review: Apple Wireless Keyboard (aluminum)

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Comments

  • irelandireland Posts: 15,290member
    To me is seems a waste to make good use of those F keys, and yet leave two unused.







    Pressing F5 takes a full screenshot, and leaves that image file on the desktop. Pressing F6 brings up the cross-hairs, so the user can use their mouse to snap a partial screenshot.
  • freenyfreeny Posts: 128member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jay Contonio View Post


    For all of you complaining about no keypad, this is for mobile computing. While a full bluetooth keyboard is a big want for me (and I hope Apple is hearing that), this keyboard is obviously created for the mobile crowd who need to throw a keyboard in their backpack.



    That makes no sense. If this is a mobile keypad one would assume that it is to be used with a laptop. Which would be kinda useless seeing as it would be extra hardware to carry as well as being the same size and missing the same keys as the keyboard that the laptop comes with.



    What are the benefits?
  • isidoreisidore Posts: 37member
    Great design but form should follow function- it is a tool isn't it??? No numeric keypad, no sale.
  • drjjonesdrjjones Posts: 162member
    There will be apps for the Iphone for use with this keyboard very quickly. If apple doesn't make it others will. One month tops. It is amazing how some people are so short sighted.
  • jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,927member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by drjjones View Post


    There will be apps for the Iphone for use with this keyboard very quickly. If apple doesn't make it others will. One month tops. It is amazing how some people are so short sighted.



    I think it's possible, but I don't think it's an app, I think the bluetooth driver structure has to be modified to allow for a keyboard profile. And then the pairing program would need to be modified to have another selection so that it offers the option to pair the keyboard.
  • bigal121892bigal121892 Posts: 4member
    I pretty much live out of a motel room, (267 nights last year), my iBook sits on and icurve, with my full size Apple wireless keyboard on the desk. I do alot of number input, and a lack of a keypad would be a detriment for me.
  • aaron h.aaron h. Posts: 8member
    It took me forever to finally get one, but after almost 2 weeks with it, I love it. The action is great and it's very comfortable (for a non-ergo keyboard). In fact, the only thing that would make this an even better keyboard is a slight split in the middle for more natural positioning.



    I am someone who in the past used my keyboard's number pad for shortcuts or number entry, but I use my mouse a hell of a lot more and have been waiting for a decent keyboard that didn't require my mouse to be half way across the desk. I love the lack of wires, but the lack of keypad (and not Bluetooth) is why I bought this. If the wired version had the same form factor I would have probably purchased that one since I wouldn't have had to wait so long.



    An earlier poster said it best, 95% of the keyboards on the market have a number pad. Why complain about the 5% that don't?
  • palegolaspalegolas Posts: 1,085member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freeny View Post


    Graphic users also need the numeric keypad for some apps. After Effects and Maya to name a few. Actually Maya is almost unusable without the home key readily available.

    Definitely a negative not having the numeric.



    Yeah, and some number people aren't using the num pad at all. I asked a programmer friend of mine why he never seemed to use the num pad, and he was like "Uh... I don't know... isn't that for auditors and economists and such..?". I guess for a programmer to constantly move the fingers to the numpad whenever you're inserting numbers would take too much time.

    I only use the num pad occasionally... so I set myself up on the waiting list They sure took their time getting this one out to the stores. It looks awesome. Thanks for the review.
  • henrikmkhenrikmk Posts: 17member
    I got this keyboard a couple of weeks ago, and it's probably the best keyboard I've ever used, including ones on laptops. Yes, I prefer that it doesn't have a numeric keypad. I rarely use those keys and there is more room for the mouse. I do find the new Exposé button placement to be annoying, so I just turned the keys off and use F9-F11 for Exposé like the old keyboard.



    About mobility, it's a big factor that you can stow your keyboard away easily on a cramped space. It's a good side effect that my table is now clean, where it was dirty and dusty underneath with a wired keyboard.



    I do however think that Apple should have made a bluetooh version with numeric keypad as well. But this thing is lightyears better than the old bluetooth keyboard, even without numeric keypad.
  • nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    "Despite the fact that the new keyboard's keys are a fraction of the height of standard keyboards and have a throw action (how far they depress when hit) that is similarly much shorter"



    Is this a measurement or an assumption? Because Apple laptops have the SAME throw distance as Apple desktop keyboards. Measure and see (Other laptops are the same--very few actually have a short throw distance--people just psychologically expect it. Or more to the point, even desktop keyboards with tall keys have a surprisingly SHORT throw distance, not difficult to replicate with thin keys.)
  • jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,927member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    "Despite the fact that the new keyboard's keys are a fraction of the height of standard keyboards and have a throw action (how far they depress when hit) that is similarly much shorter"



    Is this a measurement or an assumption? Because Apple laptops have the SAME throw distance as Apple desktop keyboards. Measure and see (Other laptops are the same--very few actually have a short throw distance--people just psychologically expect it. Or more to the point, even desktop keyboards with tall keys have a surprisingly SHORT throw distance, not difficult to replicate with thin keys.)



    I really don't know where you are getting this. I just measured two keyboards, the key throw on Apple's lint terrarium keyboard is 0.15" and key throw on the new wireless keyboard is 0.06". That's a factor of 2.5. While there are some cases what you say is true, I have not seen many notebooks with the longer throw, and I have not seen many desktop keyboards with the shorter throw.
  • rraburrabu Posts: 238member
    We got burnt with this downgrade. On one hand, I should have read around more before we ordered the new iMac. On the other hand, Apple should state quite clearly on the Apple Store that the bluetooth version does NOT have a numeric keypad. I wish Apple would have included the numeric keypad as a separate bluetooth device that could clip to the edge of the keyboard or be used independently...
  • pomopomo Posts: 51member
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the "Return" button also the "Enter" button? I think you hold fn and it turns it into an enter button, right. Well, if that's the case, that's one less reason to gripe about this wireless keyboard .



    BTW, I'm getting it with my new Imac once Leopard comes around because it's so freakin' awesome .
  • pomopomo Posts: 51member
    aggree.



    <QUOTE>I do however think that Apple should have made a bluetooh version with numeric keypad as well. But this thing is lightyears better than the old bluetooth keyboard, even without numeric keypad.</QUOTE>
  • jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,927member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pomo View Post


    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the "Return" button also the "Enter" button? I think you hold fn and it turns it into an enter button, right. Well, if that's the case, that's one less reason to gripe about this wireless keyboard .



    BTW, I'm getting it with my new Imac once Leopard comes around because it's so freakin' awesome .



    There are two enter keys on many keyboards, one is sometimes called a return key. They do have different meanings in some programs. I think Fn+Enter might get you the other enter, but I have no way to test that that I can think of at the moment. I should check to see if Fn+Backspace functions as a delete key or not. If need be, it is also possible to differentiate between the two shift bars, two control buttons (though this keyboard only has one) and so on.
  • rich-mysterrich-myster Posts: 771member
    i got the keyboard a few days ago and like ai i give it a 5 on 5. It really comes down to the personal rating. I never used the numeric pad and never will. I have always used the top row of numbers because they are right there above the letters. I believe the keyboard is both beautiful and works great and i recommend it to anyone who wants a keyboard that's both light and wireless and doesn't need the number pad.
  • eckingecking Posts: 1,588member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gon View Post


    I honestly don't understand the bitching that has went on from the start with this keyboard. If you put a numpad on it, not only would that screw the ergonomic placement of the mouse but it would actually make it worse to use on your lap which *is* a major expected capability for many wireless keyboards. If a person wants a fixed numpad and they are going to be working on the desk, then the USB version should be strictly better since it has downstream ports.



    Not to mention people looking for a numpad will be well served by almost any keyboard on the market. It is curious behavior to complain because the last 5% of keyboards are not the same way, too. How dare someone prefer a different hardware setup?



    100% Agree. It's about choice guys, you can choose not to buy it. And there are people in the thread who obviously already own the current bluetooth keyboard, including myself. Keep using yours, it is not broken because a new style is out.



    I'm actually gonna sell my original BT keyboard because it's too damn big to use off the desk, this one is awesome. If you want a full size get the full size one they're still around, or get another company's offering.
  • nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    I really don't know where you are getting this. I just measured two keyboards, the key throw on Apple's lint terrarium keyboard is 0.15" and key throw on the new wireless keyboard is 0.06". That's a factor of 2.5. While there are some cases what you say is true, I have not seen many notebooks with the longer throw, and I have not seen many desktop keyboards with the shorter throw.



    Interesting--and you seem to know what you're talking about, but I still wonder if you're measuring the right thing: my PowerBook has the same (or VERY close) throw as both generations of white keyboard I own, and I've used my friends' newer MacBook Pros without noticing any difference vs. my AlBook. (I know the new desktop keyboards are more like MacBook non-Pros.)



    Just to be sure, here's how to measure the throw (it's nothing to do with the height of the key "side walls", it's how far the motion is):



    1. Put a credit card on top of the keys, so it just touches the top corner of some key, leaving the rest exposed for you to press.



    2. Press it down and measure the gap--and be sure to measure the same point that was touching before (not a part that is curved lower). That's how far the key moved down.



    (I do notice that both my desktop and laptop keyboards will stop, and then if you press HARD will go a little further. That doesn't happen in daily typing, but if you pressed hard while measuring one keyboard and not another, it could be a factor.)



    I'd be astonished if the new desktop keyboards have 2/5 the travel (less than half!) of my PowerBook, and I didn't notice anything like that when I tried the new iMac at the store.



    Plus, visually you can see the new keyboards' keys depress about the same as their visible height. And that's about the same (without measuring) as the travel on my older Mac keyboards and my PowerBook. Certainly not less than half.



    EDIT: I just re-measured my desktop keyboards (~.15 as you say) and my aluminum PowerBook--JUST under, maybe ~.13 or so. My older Apple desktop keyboards definitely NOT throwing 2.5x farther than my PowerBook, which seems to have the same exact keyboard as the current Intel MacBook Pros. I don't see Apple using less than half the throw for their desktops as their MacBook Pros have, so I remain skeptical about your .06" measurement (but will test that again next time I'm around the new keyboards).



    I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm saying I have enough cause for doubt that I'm curious to be sure either way
  • mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 6,801member
    The wired aluminum is fantastic. I'm buying a couple more.



    Works great in Linux as well. The only thing I have yet to see are the keymappings for the custom keys for Linux.
  • satchmosatchmo Posts: 2,680member
    Why Apple didn't come out with a keyboard (with numeric keypad) using the scalloped keys of the MacBook PRO, is beyond me.

    Practically everyone raves about the comfortable feel, plus the aluminum coloured keys would eliminate any white on silver. But I suppose there's a design language or cost reasons that won over comfort or useability.
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