Web site lists TomTom iPhone mount for £99.00 ($168.50)

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
A U.K Web site has made the TomTom cradle and accompanying software available for pre-order at a cost of 99 pounds, or about $168.50 U.S., though a company spokesman would not confirm that price.



The price on handtec.co.uk, discovered by Daniweb.com, is the first possible glimpse at the anticipated product's retail cost. On Amazon.com, the least expensive new TomTom sells for $129.99, while most sell for more than $200, making the iPhone model competitively priced (excluding the cost of the handset).



When reached by AppleInsider Wednesday morning, TomTom spokesman Kevin Carter said the company could not confirm the price.



"At this point we haven't publicly announced pricing," Carter said, "either in the U.K. or the U.S."



First unveiled by Apple at the WWDC keynote in June, the accessory kit will act as a basic suction-cup mount for the dashboard or windshield. Additionally, it will amplify the GPS signal, support both hands-free calling and music through the stereo system, and charge the iPhone from the car's 12-volt port. A release date is not currently available.



The application is said to take advantage of iPhone OS 3.0's support for true, turn-by-turn directions. The software will have both nation-specific and international maps from TomTom, will work in either landscape or portrait modes, and give voice directions.



The software will reportedly be available for separate purchase from the App Store, and would rely on the iPhone's internal GPS receiver. The hardware kit, however, comes with its own, separate GPS. It will be one of the first external accessories to take advantage of iPhone 3.0's capabilities.



The TomTom iPhone mount will boost the device's GPS reception.



The TomTom has already been beaten to market by a few competing options. The AT&T Navigator application hit the App Store in June. The software is free, but requires a $9.95 monthly service subscription, which the exclusive U.S. iPhone carrier plans to market alongside new iPhone sales at its retail and online stores as a bolt-on service. And the Navigon MobileNavigator application is priced at $99, but on sale for $69 through Aug. 15. It features NAVTEQ maps, lane assist, and day and night modes.
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Comments

  • irnchrizirnchriz Posts: 1,419member
    Oh well then. Wont be buying one of those considering you can get a TomTom for the same cost. Are TomTom stating that their base model is actually free then and all you are paying for when you buy that is the cradle to hold it and the software?



    You can get Tom Tom 7 UK & Ireland for £39.99 plus VAT at the moment (on DVD) and Bluetooth GPS receivers for as little as £12 plus VAT



    Just because people are used to paying a bit more for Apple kit doesn't mean that they are open to price gouging by third parties.
  • nace33nace33 Posts: 94member
    Wow, no thanks!
  • icarbonicarbon Posts: 196member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post


    Oh well then. Wont be buying one of those considering you can get a TomTom for the same cost. Are TomTom stating that their base model is actually free then and all you are paying for when you buy that is the cradle to hold it and the software?



    Just because people are used to paying a bit more for Apple kit doesn't mean that they are open to price gouging by third parties.



    Oh no, what you are paying for is the ability to lump your gps into the same device...
  • john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,627member
    At that price, thieves will be breaking car windows just to steal the mounts.
  • tulkastulkas Posts: 3,691member
    Quote:

    The price on handtec.co.uk, discovered by Daniweb.com, is the first possible glimpse at the anticipated product's retail cost. On Amazon.com, the least expensive new TomTom sells for $129.99, while most sell for more than $200, making the iPhone model competitively priced (excluding the cost of the handset).



    Ok. This made me laugh. Competitively priced, excluding the cost of the handset. So, Competitively priced, excluding usefulness.



    No handset, means no display, no maps, no voice directions, no visual directions.



    All in all, I was looking forward to the TomTom unit. Not anymore. Going to guess that they will also charge for the maps themselves. Maybe they can throw in a subscription fee to make it even less appealing.
  • aaargh!aaargh! Posts: 10member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post


    Oh well then. Wont be buying one of those considering you can get a TomTom for the same cost. Are TomTom stating that their base model is actually free then and all you are paying for when you buy that is the cradle to hold it and the software?(...)



    Maybe the cradle includes a iTunes code that lets you download the software for free ? That could be a way to sell the cradle relatively cheap while preventing people from just buying the cradle for the handsfree function and/or using it with competing software.
  • cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    If I recall correctly, that cradle actually has its own gps radio that they say is a lot stronger than the iPhones, which will allow for better performance. Keep that in mind when considering the price.
  • kasperkasper Posts: 939member, administrator, moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    If I recall correctly, that cradle actually has its own gps radio that they say is a lot stronger than the iPhones, which will allow for better performance. Keep that in mind when considering the price.



    this is true.
  • syklee26syklee26 Posts: 78member
    If Navigon software sells for $69.99 (or $99.99), then TomTom should not sell the whole thing for more than $99 or $129.
  • dagamer34dagamer34 Posts: 494member
    Well, the REAL question is what kind of TomTom will the iPhone version be comparable to? I mean, if the iPhone app has all the bells and whistles, then $200 additional really isn't that much to ask when the price for a high end GPS can easily reach $400+. I doubt with the amount of money they are asking from people, TomTom is going to skimp on features.



    One thing I do wish would happen is for Apple to automatically increase the brightness to max when the phone is on AC power. When I stick the phone in my car, I always have to change the brightness because otherwise it's not easily visible when driving.
  • bigmc6000bigmc6000 Posts: 767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    If I recall correctly, that cradle actually has its own gps radio that they say is a lot stronger than the iPhones, which will allow for better performance. Keep that in mind when considering the price.



    Right but without the iPhone it's completely useless. $129 total (cradle and software included) is my absolute max price and with that enhanced GPS functionality it better work with my 2G iPhone since that's the one I plan on using so my 3Gs is still available for talking and such.
  • mebbertmebbert Posts: 56member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bigmc6000 View Post


    ...it better work with my 2G iPhone...



    This is my question. I want to know if it works with the 2G.



    I will be very interested in this since it will also handle both music and phone over the radio. Anyone know how it will be able to do both? I had the impression that Apple did not allow the phone to function through the dock connection.
  • anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,558member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    If I recall correctly, that cradle actually has its own gps radio that they say is a lot stronger than the iPhones, which will allow for better performance. Keep that in mind when considering the price.



    Actually, I thought it only provided an external antenna, not a complete GPS receiver. But, even if it does include that, those chips are pretty much dirt cheap, so hardly justify the cost. If that's the real price, I think it will be a complete flop. The only reason to buy their GPS app and one of these, as opposed to a dedicated unit, is to save significant money, not so you can gush, "OMG! I have TomTom on my iPhone! OMG!"



    I mean, what happens when you get an important call just as a critical turn is coming up.
  • tulkastulkas Posts: 3,691member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mebbert View Post


    I will be very interested in this since it will also handle both music and phone over the radio. Anyone know how it will be able to do both? I had the impression that Apple did not allow the phone to function through the dock connection.



    It should be pretty simple for them to do. iPods have been able to do it for years (output music over the dock connector), so why not iPhones. I don't recall Apple preventing it on the iphones or if it was just a limitation of not have Dock Connector Accessory support, prior to OSX 3.0.
  • eh270eh270 Posts: 60member
    So for LESS money you can get a dedicated unit... wait, can someone define 'competitive' for me?

  • eaieai Posts: 417member
    Perhaps most interesting is the implication that the software is bundled with the cradle - not through the App Store - how will that work?



    The iPhone dock connector does output audio (from the iPod/quicktime) and always has. I'm not sure about it supporting the phone etc.
  • floccusfloccus Posts: 138member
    Um, can we all keep in mind that that is NOT an official price? I seriously can't see TomTom trying to sell the base for 99 (dollars or pounds, I expect it would be the same numbers regardless of currency) and then expect you to buy the app from the Appstore (they could give it away for free but that would hinder sales of the base unit). The hardware is the primary cost component, and Apple has already taken care of that. Yes, there's a stronger GPS receiver in the base, but those don't cost much more than $10 max on the scale they'd be buying them.



    I expect TomTom to release the whole deal at $99, thats a fair price for both the base and the app and will put them in the lead with iPhone users.
  • cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


    Actually, I thought it only provided an external antenna, not a complete GPS receiver. But, even if it does include that, those chips are pretty much dirt cheap, so hardly justify the cost. If that's the real price, I think it will be a complete flop. The only reason to buy their GPS app and one of these, as opposed to a dedicated unit, is to save significant money, not so you can gush, "OMG! I have TomTom on my iPhone! OMG!"



    I mean, what happens when you get an important call just as a critical turn is coming up.



    You could be right, I don't even remember where I saw it now, all I know is that it is more than just a cradle. Compared to other turn by turn apps on the app store, I think the stand (which includes the app right?) is competitive. Although I would consider the current turn by turn apps to be price gouging as well. Google maps is good enough for me anyway.
  • trajectorytrajectory Posts: 647member
    Pricey. What happens if you want to use the app when walking around, without the cradle? Will it still work without the GPS enhancer in the cradle, and how well will it work? Also, not sure how well it will work without a built-in compass, which only the 3GS phones have.
  • chwilliamchwilliam Posts: 11member
    I'm guessing it's £99.00 for the base and a promo code to get the software. Also keep in mind that, in terms of pricing, the USD price roughly matches the GBP price, so it's probably $99, not $168.
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