Book listing implies Apple to release 'Aperture X' in 2010

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
A new book available for preorder on Amazon.com implies that a new 3.0 version of Aperture, called Apple Aperture X, could be coming by May 2010.



The book is listed as "Apple Aperture X (3) - UNDER NDA: A Workflow Guide for Digital Photographers," and the 320-page paperback from Focal Press has a release date of May 26, 2010, perhaps suggesting a timeframe for the forthcoming software's release.



The forthcoming book's ISBN number is 978-0240521787. According to isbn.nu, it is not available for preorder anywhere other than Amazon, where the title implies it remains under a non-disclosure agreement, suggesting its posting was a mistake.



The product description states that the guide is "fully updated for Aperture X." It offers no details on the future software.



"Aperture is a dedicated end-to-end workflow tool for photographers, and this book guides the reader through the complete process from capture to input," the listing reads. "The beauty of Aperture is that -- unlike Adobe's rival workflow software, Lightroom -- it doesn't force a particular structure or workflow on the user. This more open-ended approach means it is becoming increasingly popular with photographers -- but also means that there is a lot to learn fro a newcomer to the software."



The authors are listed as Ken McMahon and Nik Rawlinson, who also co-wrote "Apple Aperture 2: A workflow guide for digital photographers," released in 2008. McMahon has also authored books on Paint Shop Pro and InDesign, while Rawlinson has written the 2009 edition of "The Ultimate iPod Guide."







Aperture hasn't seen a major reference release since 2.0 shipped in February 2008, when Apple reduced the original $499 price tag to $199 in order to spur sales after two years of mixed reviews.



Since 2.0, the company has issued a half-dozen minor updates at regular intervals, each primarily addressing performance and stability issues. However, just weeks after the release of 2.0, Apple delivered Aperture 2.1 with a significant new feature: support for new plugins intended to create a third party ecosystem around the product. Since then over six dozen Aperture 2 plugins have been developed by a variety of publishers.



Aperture vs Lightroom



Just months after Aperture was first released, it was met with potential competition from an experimental new app called Lightroom, which emerged from Adobe Labs as a Mac-only beta in January 2006. It officially shipped as a 1.0 release a little over a year later for both Mac OS X and Windows under the name "Photoshop Lightroom."



Last year, Adobe released Photoshop Lightroom 2.0; earlier this year, Adobe cited statistics stating that 44.4% of professional photographers using Macs were using Lightroom compared to 12.5% using Aperture. Across all photographers in the survey of 1,045 users on both Macs and Windows, 37% used Lightroom, 6.4% used Aperture, and 57.9% reported simply using the Photoshop Camera Raw plugin.



Adobe's successful entry into the photography workflow market caused Apple grief not just because of Lightroom's popularity, but also because the company now has to balance competing against Adobe with championing Lightroom for being one of the first major, modern Mac OS X Cocoa apps built from scratch as well one of the first and few 64-bit apps released for the Mac.



64-bit Pro Apps



Adobe has expressed an intention to deliver other 64-bit Mac apps, but was stymied by Apple's decision to drop 64-bit support for portions of the legacy Carbon API required to develop graphical applications. This decision was announced at Apple's WWDC event in June 2007, sending Adobe and other long time Mac developers back to the drawing board.



In the nearly two and half years since it announced its Cocoa-only strategy for 64-bit apps on Mac OS X, Apple has converted nearly all of the apps bundled in Mac OS X Snow Leopard to run as 64-bit programs, with the notable exception of iTunes, iLife apps, iWork apps, and the company's Pro Apps.



Many users were surprised to see Apple release new 32-bit versions of its Pro Apps in this summer's announcement of Final Cut Pro 7 and its companion apps in Final Cut Studio 3.0 (Motion, Soundtrack Pro, Color, and Compressor) as well as Logic Pro 9 and its suite of apps.







X marks the spot



The apparent renaming of Aperture X and its release slated sometime early next year suggests that Apple may be planning a rebranding of its entire Pro App library with the "X" version for 2010, and could take the opportunity to deliver 64-bit upgrades at that time as well. The company began naming versions of its iLife and iWork packages after the year of their release starting in 2004, so iLife X and iWork X would also also fit into this same naming convention for the new year.



In addition to its use in Mac OS X, Apple also applied the Roman numeral X version to QuickTime with the release of Snow Leopard this year, even though the previous version was 7.6; the new 64-bit version is now specified as 10.0, and Apple's marketing refers to it as QuickTime X.



In addition to using "X for ten," Apple also uses (and pronounces) X as the letter in relation to several server and development products, including its Xserve hardware, Xsan clustering filesystem, Xcode development tools, and Xgrid distributed computing technology.



Mac OS X, Xcode, and Xgrid are all based upon technologies derived from Steve Jobs' NeXT, Inc., which Apple acquired in 1997. Apple's subsequent frequent use of "X" was closely associated with NeXT and Jobs, who also popularized the "i" in iMac, iPod, iApps, iSight, iPhone, and initially to himself as Apple's "iCEO."
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Comments

  • spookmagspookmag Posts: 13member
    adobe is saying that lightroom 3 will be out in april of next year and I bet apple has aperture ready to release before adobe. Apple is always first. just like releasing all new line of hardware and OS right before window$ 7. I've been waiting for a new Aperture and now that snow leopard is out the next version will be 64bit. Can't wait.
  • igamogamigamogam Posts: 41member
    Although I really like using Aperture for it's ease of use and flexibility I think Apple has missed it's chance to dominate with their product.



    I finally took the plunge and downloaded LR 3 (beta) today and the little playing I have done with it so far makes me feel that I will eventually abandon Aperture in it's favour.



    Aperture is not developing quickly enough and it's poor inergration with other programs such as Photoshop and various HDR & panoramic stitching software is a definite drawback.



    I think somehow Aperture X (3) will be too little too late unless it has some incredible new features. Adobe seem to have all the bases covered... \
  • macheimachei Posts: 83member
    *finally*



    Finally some word, even if by mistake, that Apple hasn't entirely abandoned the whole pro photography area. Now I at least have some reason to be patient while I wait for the release. All I can say is, it better damned well be stellar. Lightroom has been looking better and better the past half year.
  • pixel19pixel19 Posts: 12member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by machei View Post


    *finally*



    Finally some word, even if by mistake, that Apple hasn't entirely abandoned the whole pro photography area. Now I at least have some reason to be patient while I wait for the release. All I can say is, it better damned well be stellar. Lightroom has been looking better and better the past half year.



    My thoughts exactly.

    AND it better support Canon sRAW or I'm gone as well.
  • eaieai Posts: 417member
    X could just mean 'insert version name here'
  • tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member
    I think part of the issue with Aperture was that Apple bought it when it still planned on including both Carbon and Cocoa support in future releases of OSx, such as with Leopard. Now it has all of these massive applications that it has to port of over to a strictly Cocoa environment. In cases like iMovie, it decided to start from scratch. I think Aperture suffered a little drag because of Apple struggling to change these applications over. Some great applications like Shake, Apple decided to not even bother trying. The fact that Apple is releasing another version is a good sign. It probably will be a significant release.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by igamogam View Post


    Although I really like using Aperture for it's ease of use and flexibility I think Apple has missed it's chance to dominate with their product.



    I finally took the plunge and downloaded LR 3 (beta) today and the little playing I have done with it so far makes me feel that I will eventually abandon Aperture in it's favour.



    Aperture is not developing quickly enough and it's poor inergration with other programs such as Photoshop and various HDR & panoramic stitching software is a definite drawback.



    I think somehow Aperture X (3) will be too little too late unless it has some incredible new features. Adobe seem to have all the bases covered... \



  • robogoborobogobo Posts: 377member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Pixel19 View Post


    My thoughts exactly.

    AND it better support Canon sRAW or I'm gone as well.



    MY thoughts exactly (though this is an OS issue not just Aperture).



    My issue with Apple regarding Aperture is not necessarily the major releases, but the fact that bug reports and feature enhancements (like naming and exporting options) go largely ignored. I mean, shit, another six months without some kind of update like 2.5 or at least 2.2, and Apple is going to lose a good many people to Lightroom. Just the fact that you can try the beta, which is still annoying with its modules, yet feature rich, will get a lot of users to switch, I think.



    Everyday I use Aperture, I feel like there are things which are good but could easily be great with just an option or two added, or inconsistencies (why don't I have access to all export options when I export a Web Page?) in function. It's so frustrating because it could be an awesome program with just a bit of attention.
  • aikiaiki Posts: 4member
    I used to work in the tech book publishing industry, and I can tell you that this article is way off base. The only thing we can really deduce from the info that Apple Insider spotted is that a new version of Aperture will be out between today and the day this book is expected to ship.



    1. "Aperture X"... It is common practice to use "X" when the final version number has not been given by the software vendor. The real number will be inserted in once Apple let's the author or the public know what it will really be called.



    2. The books shipping date does not indicate anything more than a likely max shipping date for the software. If, anything it suggests a much earlier shipping date since books take quite a bit of time to edit, proof and print... and the editing and proofing take even longer with a product that hasn't shipped since the final UI and features could change at any time. Most books ship about two to six months after the actual product when the author is a beta tester.
  • fishstick_kittyfishstick_kitty Posts: 175member
    Quote:

    In the nearly two and half years since it announced its Cocoa-only strategy for 64-bit apps on Mac OS X, Apple has converted nearly all of the apps bundled in Mac OS X Snow Leopard to run as 64-bit programs, with the notable exception of iTunes, iLife apps, iWork apps, and the company's Pro Apps.



    LOL...just a few minor exceptions.
  • wizard69wizard69 Posts: 11,719member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by igamogam View Post


    Although I really like using Aperture for it's ease of use and flexibility I think Apple has missed it's chance to dominate with their product.



    They don't need to dominate, they simply need enough feature to keep the product salable.

    Quote:

    I finally took the plunge and downloaded LR 3 (beta) today and the little playing I have done with it so far makes me feel that I will eventually abandon Aperture in it's favour.



    What is the sense in comparing a beta product to an app that has been in production for a couple of years now? Especially considering Aperture will be revised in the same time frame.



    The other thing to consider is that with GCD and OpenCL Apple has the features in place in the OS to allow for a major rewrite of the software. Simply put Apple will have enough resources available to give Aperture an entirely new feel.

    Quote:



    Aperture is not developing quickly enough and it's poor inergration with other programs such as Photoshop and various HDR & panoramic stitching software is a definite drawback.



    .

    I'm not sure what you mean by integration. Aperture has plugins but it is up to third parties to write those plug ins. As to some of those features mentioned they should really be part of Aperture in the first place. Especially stiching software but even HDR probably should be in there.



    It is interesting that you mentioned those features as I've wanted native support for stiching ever since purchaseing Aperture. It seems like a basic feature for any photo management program. It is the compliment in many ways to cropping a picture.

    Quote:



    I think somehow Aperture X (3) will be too little too late unless it has some incredible new features. Adobe seem to have all the bases covered... \



    What are you talking about here, niether product has been released yet. You have no idea what is in the coming version of Aperture so you compare a beta to an old version. Don't you see a problem here.



    As to your seemingly negative image of Aperture due to the few updates that have been served up, some of us like it that way. For one it means Aperture is stable. Second few of us want to be updating basic software like this every three months or so. After Apeture 3 comes out I hope that it also demonstrates the same stability.





    Dave
  • shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aiki View Post


    I used to work in the tech book publishing industry, and I can tell you that this article is way off base. The only thing we can really deduce from the info that Apple Insider spotted is that a new version of Aperture will be out between today and the day this book is expected to ship.



    1. "Aperture X"... It is common practice to use "X" when the final version number has not been given by the software vendor. The real number will be inserted in once Apple let's the author or the public know what it will really be called.



    But Aperture X (3) makes some sense. QuickTime X also gives a clue. The final app name may not be decided yet, but it looks plausible that Apple will use the "X" branding for the apps which take advantage of the new technologies (OpenCL, GCD).



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aiki View Post


    2. The books shipping date does not indicate anything more than a likely max shipping date for the software. If, anything it suggests a much earlier shipping date since books take quite a bit of time to edit, proof and print... and the editing and proofing take even longer with a product that hasn't shipped since the final UI and features could change at any time. Most books ship about two to six months after the actual product when the author is a beta tester.



    In many cases the books come alongside the product release (even Apple-related ones). In any case, the date gives a very approximate timeframe. All deadlines (both in Aperture development and book publishing) could slip. I am fine with your "a likely max shipping date for the software" statement, but I also think that it is unlikely that the product will ship much earlier (say, March 2010). If anything else, deadlines tend to be pushed back, not forward, especially in the software industry.
  • shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fishstick_kitty View Post


    LOL...just a few minor exceptions.



    Note the "all of the apps bundled in Mac OS X Snow Leopard" thing.
  • lucdlucd Posts: 1member
    Aperture 64 bit, using the new OpenCL and Grand Central Dispatch, count me in!!



    I've always tried out both Light Room and Aperture, that being said I could never get my mind wrapped around LR... I used it for a few weeks when I was out of a Mac, I couldn't stand it... I recently tried LR2 for a second time after my buddies mocked me for using Aperture saying Light Room was the end all.... I can't use it, the different steps, setting up libraries so confusing... not to mention its absolutely hideous UI, it hurts my eyes for that reason alone I'd rather use iPhoto over Light Room....
  • cincyteecincytee Posts: 187member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by igamogam View Post


    Although I really like using Aperture for it's ease of use and flexibility I think Apple has missed it's chance to dominate with their product.



    "It's" is a contraction for "it is"; "its" is a possessive pronoun like "his" and "hers."
  • wizard69wizard69 Posts: 11,719member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBell View Post


    I think part of the issue with Aperture was that Apple bought it when it still planned on including both Carbon and Cocoa support in future releases of OSx, such as with Leopard.



    This is certainly part of the issue. I'm not sure why there is so much whinning in this thread about Aperture, it is pretty obvious that keeping it around requires a complete rewrite.

    Quote:

    Now it has all of these massive applications that it has to port of over to a strictly Cocoa environment. In cases like iMovie, it decided to start from scratch. I think Aperture suffered a little drag because of Apple struggling to change these applications over.



    Actually I believe that is only part of the issue. Apple is likely targetting SL and it's GCD & OpenCL features to make significant strides in performance. I actually don't think getting Aperture up and running on Cocoa is a big deal. Getting Aperture functioning as paralized code with leading edge performance is.

    Quote:

    Some great applications like Shake, Apple decided to not even bother trying. The fact that Apple is releasing another version is a good sign. It probably will be a significant release.



    I would imagine very significant. It should be much faster and likely will be SL only. I suspect a heavily refactored user interface too. Further I would not be surprised to see Apple release Cocoa FrameWorks to support a common interface across the pro apps. I see this as a case of not wanting to rush the cook until the sauce is done. Apple is making a break from the past that could lead to some really state of the art software. In this case don't judge a NEW book by it's OLD cover!!!



    As a side note I have to wonder just how gullible photographers are. Adobes beta is nothing more than a marketing ploy to snare you before Apple releases their new version. Don't fall for that crap, wait for both revisions to come out. Experience them, challenge the software and get a feel for responsiveness and then make a choice. Don't be weak businessmen.





    Dave
  • successsuccess Posts: 1,039member
    Can't wait for the new Lightroom
  • gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member
    Even though there is a lot of partisan support here for one product or another, it's good to remember that if you look at the reviews and compare the features that for the most part Aperture vs. Lightroom is pretty much a "six of one and half a dozen of the other" situation. Please feel free to quote this part of my post as you rant on about what killer feature on has but the other doesn't, but at the end of the day we all know it's generally true that these are both good products that do essentially the same thing in very similar ways.



    IMO the main differentiator for sales of the product is integration with the CS suite. As long as there are people who use that crap, and as long as Adobe dominates in that area on the Mac platform, there are always going to be people who vie for Lightroom over Aperture. While the movement to go around the giant obstacle Adobe has created by releasing such absolute garbage as the CS suite for Mac and monopolising the market has long since started, it will likely be years before Adobe completely collapses as a viable alternative on the Mac platform. The "cool kids" have already stopped using CS suite, but the Pros still do grudgingly (because they have to), even though they would love to have alternatives.



    Both products will be around for a long time. People will continue to use both and argue over the minutiae of the differences. Lightroom will continue to be the integrated choice as Adobe continues to live in denial of their own crappitude, and 90% of the world will continue not to care very much about a fight between two over-priced high end "niche" products on the worlds most expensive computer platform.
  • digitalclipsdigitalclips Posts: 15,390member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spookmag View Post


    adobe is saying that lightroom 3 will be out in april of next year and I bet apple has aperture ready to release before adobe. Apple is always first. just like releasing all new line of hardware and OS right before window$ 7. I've been waiting for a new Aperture and now that snow leopard is out the next version will be 64bit. Can't wait.



    Agreed, I just hope there is a reasonable update for us loyal users



    Personally I'd love an Pro Apple version of a Photoshop type app that used all the great and intuitive UI features of iLife / iWork apps. They could call it Mac Paint Pro
  • john the geekjohn the geek Posts: 73member
    I'm an Aperture user who just yesterday purchased Lightroom. (it hasn't even arrived yet.) I love Aperture, but I've been looking for options for a few months now. This "2.x forever" thing has been driving me nuts and there aren't enough plug-ins to make up for the missing pieces I need. From simple glitches like iffy second-monitor support, to big issues like crappy implementation of tools (blotting black into an eye is not red-eye reduction), or tools that are completely MIA (like chromatic aberration correction). I wrote the Feedback team a novella a while back and hope that they take their user's feedback into consideration. Aperture has potential to be so much better.



    Hope we see it soon...
  • richysrichys Posts: 160member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Mac OS X, Xcode, and Xgrid are all based upon technologies derived from Steve Jobs' NeXT, Inc., which Apple acquired in 1997. Apple's subsequent frequent use of "X" was closely associated with NeXT and Jobs, who also popularized the "i" in iMac, iPod, iApps, iSight, iPhone, and initially to himself as Apple's "iCEO."



    Well, let's hope that Steve never becomes the xCEO!



    More seriously though, can someone explain what Aperture and/or Lightroom can do to make my life better? I'm just about to invest in my first proper camera (and proper HD film camera) in the shape of a Lumix GH1. I don't think iPhoto and iMovie are going to be up to scratch! I currently have an ancient copy of Photochop kicking around -- I presume I'll need to upgrade this. So, do I need (want!) Aperture for?
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