Apple to release iOS 5 GM to assemblers during week of Sept. 23

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple reportedly plans to release the golden master of iOS 5, its forthcoming operating system update for the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, to its overseas assemblers at some point between September 23 and September 30, on time for a mid-October launch of a fifth-generation iPhone.



Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo revealed to AppleInsider on Monday that the new iPhone and iPod touch went into mass production in late August, and assemblers are currently scheduled to receive the golden master of iOS 5 the week of September 30. Typically, a golden master version of software is identical to the code that eventually becomes the final release to the public.



Upon receiving the software, Apple's overseas assemblers will be able to install it on the finalized hardware and prepare it for shipping. The latest version of iOS will come preinstalled on both the fifth-generation models of the iPhone and iPod touch, set to be released in the coming weeks.



A release of iOS 5 to assemblers the week of Sept. 23 means its likely finalized hardware units for the new iPhone and iPod touch will begin to ship at the end of September. With an estimated 10 to 12 days for shipping, the two new devices are likely to be available by mid-October, Kuo said.



That's consistent with numerous rumors that have claimed Apple is gearing up for an October launch for its fifth-generation iPhone. One report from earlier this month similarly indicated that iPhone 5 hardware is being stocked without packaging at overseas assembling plants because Apple is not yet ready to install iOS 5 on the devices.



For its part, Apple has only publicly promised that iOS 5 will become available to iPhone, iPad and iPod touch users this fall. The company does not discuss future products, and has not officially confirmed the existence of the anticipated "iPhone 5" or fifth-gen iPod touch.







Developers are currently working with the seventh beta of iOS 5 released earlier this month. The pre-release software contains bugs and is meant only for developers to test App Store software and ensure compatibility with new features.



Apple has already highlighted a number of new features that will be found in iOS 5, including the all-new Notification Center, iMessage application, and a new PC-free design that allows over-the-air syncing through iCloud and wireless software updates. The company is also believed to be working on additional, still-secret functionality that has yet to be publicly revealed, including advanced voice recognition and commands.



For more on iOS 5, see AppleInsider's extensive coverage of the operating system update in Inside iOS 5.
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Comments

  • asdasdasdasd Posts: 4,229member
    So how do assemblers get the OS on the device? Surely not iTunes?
  • diddydiddy Posts: 282member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


    So how do assemblers get the OS on the device? Surely not iTunes?



    Probably via a system image that is deployed to the drive. Same way they do it for laptops and other devices that have an OS.
  • brutus009brutus009 Posts: 356member
    Eagerly awaiting the iOS 5 on 3GS experience.



    I'll be getting the new phone, but my girl has another year on contract. Just crossing my fingers she doesn't get bricked like early iOS 4 on 3GS...
  • s4mb4s4mb4 Posts: 267member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by brutus009 View Post


    Eagerly awaiting the iOS 5 on 3GS experience.



    I'll be getting the new phone, but my girl has another year on contract. Just crossing my fingers she doesn't get bricked like early iOS 4 on 3GS...



    the beta is working great on my sons 3GS.
  • s8er01zs8er01z Posts: 144member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by s4mb4 View Post


    the beta is working great on my sons 3GS.



    Hows your software development coming along?
  • al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


    So how do assemblers get the OS on the device? Surely not iTunes?



    how does foxconn load OS X and Windows on millions of computers? surely they don't have people do it manually?



    they have special HD imaging machines. been done this way since the 1990's. nothing new
  • diddydiddy Posts: 282member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    how does foxconn load OS X and Windows on millions of computers? surely they don't have people do it manually?



    I do this at work (since we really can't do image deployment - machines are too different). It is really boring work.
  • shompashompa Posts: 338member
    10.72 has iCloud support.

    iOS 5 is GM.

    Everyting is ready for Iphone5 + Iphone4s /Ipod touch



    Within a couple of days the press will get invitation to something special.
  • herbapouherbapou Posts: 2,172member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shompa View Post


    Within a couple of days the press will get invitation to something special.



    Its kind of late already, maybe they wont do a press event?
  • chabigchabig Posts: 583member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    how does foxconn load OS X and Windows on millions of computers? surely they don't have people do it manually?



    they have special HD imaging machines. been done this way since the 1990's. nothing new



    High Definition imaging machines?
  • asdasdasdasd Posts: 4,229member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    how does foxconn load OS X and Windows on millions of computers? surely they don't have people do it manually?



    they have special HD imaging machines. been done this way since the 1990's. nothing new



    Someone shoud put those in the APple stores. Or a smaller version.



    I was aware of the computer image loading. Even then, OS loading is slow pat of the process, and doing custom versions worse.
  • asdasdasdasd Posts: 4,229member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chabig View Post


    High Definition imaging machines?



    Hard drive.
  • malaxmalax Posts: 1,598member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by diddy View Post


    Probably via a system image that is deployed to the drive. Same way they do it for laptops and other devices that have an OS.



    Right, but it's still an interesting logistical challenge. Presumably there are tens of thousands of devices already assembled that'll need the software loaded onto them. It would be cool to see how they do that (unless it's just thousands of kids getting paid pennies to do it manually).
  • hittrj01hittrj01 Posts: 731member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by S8ER01Z View Post


    Hows your software development coming along?



    I may just be because it's early and my sarcasm sensor is out of whack, but if you were trying to take a jab at him, I don't see the point. Even if he isn't developing software, as long as he paid the $99 for a developer account, what does it matter? Everyone has the right to test the software, so long as you pay the $99 fee.
  • shenshen Posts: 434member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chabig View Post


    High Definition imaging machines?



    I admit, i laughed. Well done for a cheap monday morning laugh...



    I am looking forward to iOS 5 more than anything since the original iPhone. Part of me is pretty bugged it is so far out still, but part of me wants it to be the best roll out they have ever had. It would be good for them to really knock this out of park.



    Android is still pretty much a poor mans iPhone, and the tablets? What a joke. Went to the daughters gymnastics meet and out of maybe 150 parents watching the girls move from event to event i saw 6 iPads being used during downtime, or even to film and take pictures. Dad in front of me had clips of his daughters vault for her to watch on the iPad trimmed and set so she could figure out what to change before the medals were handed out. Have still only one single other tablet in the wild ever. One of the $99 HP blowouts, day after the sale. They have never taken it out since then and have told me they are saving for "the real thing."



    Still, if this release is as good as it looks, rolls out smoothly, and installs on older gear, the perception that Apple gets it right and everyone else is just faking it will be greatly enhanced.
  • cvaldes1831cvaldes1831 Posts: 1,832member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


    So how do assemblers get the OS on the device? Surely not iTunes?



    Probably some sort of USB imaging station, likely one that can handle dozens of devices at once. Like disk drive cloning stations, but on a volume production level.



    Remember, just because iTunes is the only tool approved for end user updates to the iPhone firmware doesn't mean that Apple can't write other tools to access/flash the firmware. These tools simply aren't distributed to the general public.
  • asdasdasdasd Posts: 4,229member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post


    I may just be because it's early and my sarcasm sensor is out of whack, but if you were trying to take a jab at him, I don't see the point. Even if he isn't developing software, as long as he paid the $99 for a developer account, what does it matter? Everyone has the right to test the software, so long as you pay the $99 fee.



    Pay the $99 and you legally get the good stuff. Or the stuff, as I prefer to call it since I loaded beta 1 on my poor iPad.
  • ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    Well then this week we should get beta 8. There are still some lingering issues that need work, some since beta 1.
  • diddydiddy Posts: 282member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by malax View Post


    Right, but it's still an interesting logistical challenge. Presumably there are tens of thousands of devices already assembled that'll need the software loaded onto them. It would be cool to see how they do that (unless it's just thousands of kids getting paid pennies to do it manually).



    Not really - remember, this kind of stuff has been going on for a while now - factories easily have the ability to deploy out to hundreds of devices at a time - it's just a standard image that is written out. It's much faster and nothing like a consumer upgrade (because factory stuff doesn't come with anything).



    Seriously, they have a machine they plug a bunch of units in, flash the device which powers off automatically and then they re-package it. Remember, they had to flash the OS on them once already during assembly. It's just repeating one of many steps.



    ETA:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post


    Remember, just because iTunes is the only tool approved for end user updates to the iPhone firmware doesn't mean that Apple can't write other tools to access/flash the firmware. These tools simply aren't distributed to the general public.



    This - Assemblers get access to much more sophisticated tools that end users don't need nor would they want to. Foxconn already does this for other vendors daily.
  • asdasdasdasd Posts: 4,229member
    It strikes me that "flashing" a flash drive is probably faster than "flashing" a movable device, like a normal HD. Anybody have a technical idea of the speeds?
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