What are we Reading?

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  • carol acarol a Posts: 1,043member
    Wrt the British naval adventure series I was beginning to read:



    I finally finished the first book, The King's Coat, and now I understand 'why' I had never heard of the author (D. Lambdin) before.



    I guess it might have something to do with the fact that those rousing sea battles, where the British navy is slaughtering the enemy and burning their ships, sometimes have the American Continental Navy as their adversary. \



    So those slaughtered sailors are Americans, during the war of independence from Britain.



    Somehow, having the destroyed foe be one's own countrymen tends to put a strange edge on those particular battle scenes in the novel.



    The 'other' British naval series I had enjoyed so much mostly took place during the Napoleonic Wars, with a different set of opponents altogether.



    Speaking of the Napoleonic Wars, I also read the entire series of Sharpe's Rifles, which dealt with the British 'army' during the same time period. Also some great and highly addictive stories.
  • @_@ artman@_@ artman Posts: 5,231member
    I'm finishing up The Scar by China Mieville. This book moves a lot faster than Perdido Street Station and is a lot more exciting.



    Next up is Neil Gaiman's American Gods. I've always liked his comic book work, so I thought I'd give it a shot.



    Then Iron Sunrise by Charles Stross...oh shit , I just found out this is a sequel to his earlier book Singularity Sky. Oh well, I've got time to look around for the other book. \
  • turnwriteturnwrite Posts: 372member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by @_@ Artman View Post


    Next up is Neil Gaiman's American Gods. I've always liked his comic book work, so I thought I'd give it a shot.



    That is a pretty good book, but it's not as good as Douglas Adams' earlier take on the same concept, in "The Long Dark Teatime of the Soul."
  • tontontonton Posts: 14,064member
    I'm still reading Clive Barker's Imajica, because I got distracted from reading during my commute for a while by a new toy.



    What an incredible piece of literature.



    Most people find it odd talking of literature and fantasy in the same breath, but that's what makes Clive Barker unique amongst his peers. His prose is gorgeous, and his character development unmatched even in the greatest classical epic. Combined with his brilliant, grotesque imagination and descriptive skills, the result is nothing short of astounding.



    The book is political, religious, feminist, humanist, horrific, erotic... it's got everything.



    One of the amazing things about this book is how each and every one of the villains' motives are displayed. Not only do we follow what the evil dopplegagner of Sartori does, we know exactly why he chooses to do it. Even minor villains have their motives clearly explained, and we are able to understand those motives, and even empathize with them, if we can pretend we're coming from within the same mindset. Did anyone know why Sauron did what he did? No, Tolkien never explained it. He was just a villain.



    Meanwhile the line between good and bad is constantly blurred, with heroes taking innocent lives, and villains showing mercy and sensitivity; not a breath of fresh air... but a breath of real air against the usual black and white of literary conflict.



    If anyone has not read Clive Barker, start now.



    Weaveworld is simply amazing, but Imajica is nothing short of a masterpiece. Barker's latest creation, Abarat, follows in a similar vein, but is a little more innocent and less refined, entertaining and stunning in visual imagery (helped by Barker's paintings) as it is.
  • bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,719member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tonton View Post


    Did anyone know why Sauron did what he did? No, Tolkien never explained it. He was just a villain.




    I have added some Clive Barker to my summer reading list. Your passionate enthusasim is too much to resist.



    But there was no reason to take a shot at Tolkien



    Admitedly Tolkien did not spend time trying to get you to empathise with all the characters--good or evil. I wouldn't call that a defect but an artistic choice. Nevertheless, if you want to know the whys of Sauron, Tolkein did spend time with character development and motivation of Sauron as well as many of the other characeters in the Lord of The Rings trilogy--just not in the LOTR itself. You can go over to the Silmarilllion. As I understand it, Tolkein intended to publish that work allong with LOTR, but the publishers balked.



    Nevertheless, you set a high bar. I expect Clive to kick some Tolkien @$$...
  • dstranathandstranathan Posts: 1,712member
    Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard.
  • tontontonton Posts: 14,064member
    Now I'm back to David Mitchell. I've read all of his books except Ghostwritten, his first, which I'm now half way through. Awesome.
  • turnwriteturnwrite Posts: 372member
    Just finished Dangerous Visions by Harlan Ellison. Great anthology of disturbing sci-fi stories.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dstranathan View Post


    Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard.



    Scientology?
  • jaimelajaimela Posts: 1member
    Another Roadside Attraction by Tom Robbins. Classic sarcasm at it's best! Only for those who are into fiction.
  • tontontonton Posts: 14,064member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaimela View Post


    Another Roadside Attraction by Tom Robbins. Classic sarcasm at it's best! Only for those who are into fiction.



    Wasn't too impressed by Catch 22, if that's what you mean by classic sarcasm...



    And I bet I'll get a lot of response to that comment.
  • danmacmandanmacman Posts: 773member
    Falling Man by Don DeLillo.
  • tontontonton Posts: 14,064member
    I've finished Ghostwritten and it was great. Maybe not as good as Number9Dream or Cloud Atlas, but still awesome.



    Now I'm reading something I've wanted to read ever since I got addicted to the old game for Mac Plus called "Bandit Kings of Ancient China". It's the Chinese classic "Outlaws of the Marsh" (also referred to as "Water Margin"). So far it's fantastic! Especially since I'm already familiar with the characters from the game.
  • kingofsomewherehotkingofsomewherehot Posts: 3,999member
    I didn't see any point in starting a NEW thread ... so maybe this one will continue.



    http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/fool...67417447?mt=11

    "Fool Me Twice" by Shawn Otto



    Very interesting read ... in some ways, a bit of a treatise on why our politicians are failing us.
  • marvfoxmarvfox Posts: 2,275member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tonton View Post


    Wasn't too impressed by Catch 22, if that's what you mean by classic sarcasm...



    And I bet I'll get a lot of response to that comment.



    A great classic is Catcher in the Rye by Salinger. It pertains to what life is about.
  • sandy009sandy009 Posts: 52member
    i'm reading SWAMPLANDIA
  • williamsjameswilliamsjames Posts: 2member


    I am currently reading Pet Sematary by Stephen King. I am on page 120 and so far am enjoying it a lot. I recommend it.

  • kingofsomewherehotkingofsomewherehot Posts: 3,999member
    "Genius: The Life and Scienc of Richard Feynman", by James Gleick
  • bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,719member
    "Genius: The Life and Scienc of Richard Feynman", by James Gleick

    Loved that one! Read it twice... His autobiography is good too ("Surely You're Joking...") but it was the main source for Genius, so there is quite a bit of overlap...
  • macbook pro i5macbook pro i5 Posts: 69member


    Heroes of olympus, have finished both books so far awaiting next book in series, have also read Time Riders series but I keep on forgetting the author.


     


    I have also read "The messenger of truth" and "An irish countrymen doctor" by Patrick Taylor.

  • theplaquetheplaque Posts: 11member


    Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins... I know I'm way behind to read this trilogy... but still, better late than never... :)

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