Apple says iPad battery charging works as intended

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  • dickprinterdickprinter Posts: 1,060member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post


    Let's talk actual behavior on an actual new iPad, and what I have to offer pertains to my iPad alone, so consider it anecdotal - a data point. With the charger connected and while playing a video stored on a hard drive over my home WiFi, I've noticed the charge percentage decline to as low as 95% while the "charging" indicator still shows a full charge. As far as I'm concerned, this has had no perceptible effect on performance. When I quit the video, the percentage comes back up to 100 in short order. So the readings behave a little differently than the 2010 original iPad that I replaced. Otherwise, it means nothing as far as I'm concerned. If some kind of actual problem surfaces, we can expect Apple to issue a patch. They've done so before.



    From what I understand, all *newer* battery operated Apple products....from iPods to iPhones to iPads to laptops....all run on battery power while plugged in, which is why the percentage drops if you're doing tasks that tax and deplete the battery faster than the charger can replenish power. If that wasn't the case then one would be able to use a completely depleted device immediately, once it's plugged into the charger. That may explain why you see your charge percentage dip while playing WiFi-streamed video. It might even dip more if you turn your screen brightness on full at the same time.



    It sounds like a SW issue if all of the charge level indicators don't jibe. Just my .02.
  • addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,667member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


    In other hands, those who find fault with the battery are ... *charging* it wrong. Good to see the Steve Jobs spirit alive and well in Cupertino.



    That doesn't even make any sense.
  • charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,068member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Actually, you have it backwards. Apple didn't overpromise, they overdelivered.



    That is basically what I said. where did Apple over promise on the battery. they said up to 10 hours. can you get that off the 100% the iPad says (as soon as it says it).
  • bestkeptsecretbestkeptsecret Posts: 1,475member
    I've noticed that sometimes when my iPhone says "100%" when charging, but does not show the "Charged" icon, if I unplug it, it shows 98%.



    I think that must be because of the trickle charging.
  • naboozlenaboozle Posts: 213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post


    Wrong on all counts. Read some more before you go expounding conspiracy theories. The battery "expert" at the bottom of this is DisplayMate's Raymond Soneira. He notes that when the iPad is left to continue charging it gets 11.6 hours of use, well beyond the advertised 10 hours. Apple is saying that when the charge indicator hits 100% you get the 10 hours (9 hours for LTE). As for your conspiracy theory about corporate skulduggery, wouldn't Apple generate much more marketing hype if they could advertise 11 or 12 hours of battery use? Yet they have chosen to stick with the same 10 hours as earlier iPads and maximize the charge-discharge cycles for better battery life.



    And this is Apple denying something and being evil? Give me a freaking break.



    No it's Apple being obtuse. 100% has a specific meaning. If 100% (fully charged) means 11.6 hours, then 10 hours is 86%. The battery indicator should be an indicator, not a feel-good device.



    I'm a fan and I like the product. But if you're going to have a battery indicator -- give real numbers.
  • jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Naboozle View Post


    No it's Apple being obtuse. 100% has a specific meaning. If 100% (fully charged) means 11.6 hours, then 10 hours is 86%. The battery indicator should be an indicator, not a feel-good device.



    I'm a fan and I like the product. But if you're going to have a battery indicator -- give real numbers.



    The charge indicator says "100%". But it doesn't say 100% of what.



    You want to assume that it's 100% of full charge. But Apple is basically saying it's 100% of RATED charge and full charge is 10% more.



    In any event, when it says 100%, you get the full rated battery life so complaining about it ridiculous.
  • lilgto64lilgto64 Posts: 1,147member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by msechea View Post


    All iOS devices, including the new iPad, will display that they are 100 percent charged just before the device reaches a fully charged state.



    Hm, I'm guessing an hour and a half of additional charging is JUST before it reaches full charge?



    That would depend on what "just before" means - with a 10 hour battery life - it does not necessarily take 10 hours to fully charge.



    Many years ago I saw a demonstration of a battery that could charge to 90% of capacity in something like 2 minutes - then would continue to full charge over the course of an hour or so. Perhaps this has finally made it into consumer products.



    If the iPad charges to say 95% of full charge in a couples hours then continues to charge from 95% to 100% over the course of another two hours, from a UI perspective you have two ways to present that to the user. 1. show the specific charge level 2. show 100% whee charging for all levels between 95 and 100%. With option 1 you run the risk of the user wondering why their device charged quickly up to 95% then "stopped" charging - that would likely be very obvious to lots of users - leaving them wondering why did it suddenly stop charging and leading to lots of tech calls etc complaining that the charger has stopped working. with option 2 the risk is that sometimes when people unhook from the charger it may not in fact be 100% charged - despite the device reporting that it is - resulting in differing use on battery times - this would be most obvious with users who yank the power cord immediately upon reaching the 100% charge level on the display.



    For my $ it would seem that a better explanation would the first case - simply document that the system charges to 95% on rapid charge - then tops off the battery in a slow charge mode - in order to deliver the best overall battery life. Compared to the second case where in effect the device is lying to us in order to mask the technical complexity of dual charging modes.
  • naboozlenaboozle Posts: 213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    The charge indicator says "100%". But it doesn't say 100% of what.



    Seriously? Maybe it's 100% of the annual Corn yield of Yugoslavia. Probably it was the picture of a battery which led my mind astray.
  • addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,667member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Naboozle View Post


    No it's Apple being obtuse. 100% has a specific meaning. If 100% (fully charged) means 11.6 hours, then 10 hours is 86%. The battery indicator should be an indicator, not a feel-good device.



    I'm a fan and I like the product. But if you're going to have a battery indicator -- give real numbers.



    Charge rates aren't linear. There's circuitry and software determining optimal charge cycles, to protect and extend battery life. Moreover, battery depletion isn't linear, so attempting to make percentage calculations working backwards from a given charge isn't useful.



    My guess is that this behavior is actually pretty typical, but that the iPad's relatively large battery and lengthy charge times make the fudge factor bigger as well, so that it become noticeable. I've yet to see any convincing calculations as to exactly what that fudge factor is, however, for the reasons above.
  • multimediamultimedia Posts: 844member
    I've not read of anyone getting the “Not Charging” message after their New iPad reaches 100%. I don't mean while it's plugged into a computer. I mean while plugged into the New iPad's charger in the wall. That's my beef. I get this all the time after it reaches 100%. And its got me bummed because I want the 1 watt trickle charge to continue while it's plugged in. Because of this displayed message with no black plug inside the grey battery icon, I can't tell if it's trickle charging or not. No one else seeing this?



    After reading this Next Web article I see it doesn't trickle charge but rather charges and discharges in a cycle near the top of a full charge. Michael Tchao does a pretty good job of explaining the process in this piece. But that still doesn't resolve my “Not Charging” from the wall display issue. Right now it's in the traditional “100%” with the black plug icon in the grey battery icon display. But in no time at all it'll be back to the “Not Charging” next to an empty grey battery icon display confusing me about my New iPad.
  • naboozlenaboozle Posts: 213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by addabox View Post


    Charge rates aren't linear. There's circuitry and software determining optimal charge cycles, to protect and extend battery life. Moreover, battery depletion isn't linear....



    Probably you would need something along the lines of a... hmm.... computer to calculate those non-linear factors.
  • myapplelovemyapplelove Posts: 1,515member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post


    That would depend on what "just before" means - with a 10 hour battery life - it does not necessarily take 10 hours to fully charge.



    Many years ago I saw a demonstration of a battery that could charge to 90% of capacity in something like 2 minutes - then would continue to full charge over the course of an hour or so. Perhaps this has finally made it into consumer products.



    If the iPad charges to say 95% of full charge in a couples hours then continues to charge from 95% to 100% over the course of another two hours, from a UI perspective you have two ways to present that to the user. 1. show the specific charge level 2. show 100% whee charging for all levels between 95 and 100%. With option 1 you run the risk of the user wondering why their device charged quickly up to 95% then "stopped" charging - that would likely be very obvious to lots of users - leaving them wondering why did it suddenly stop charging and leading to lots of tech calls etc complaining that the charger has stopped working. with option 2 the risk is that sometimes when people unhook from the charger it may not in fact be 100% charged - despite the device reporting that it is - resulting in differing use on battery times - this would be most obvious with users who yank the power cord immediately upon reaching the 100% charge level on the display.



    For my $ it would seem that a better explanation would the first case - simply document that the system charges to 95% on rapid charge - then tops off the battery in a slow charge mode - in order to deliver the best overall battery life. Compared to the second case where in effect the device is lying to us in order to mask the technical complexity of dual charging modes.



    Good post (and you are one of the few people here who got it), but it's not really lying to cover technical complexity, it's lying to cover long charging battery times in the last % of charge, and a long total charging time. I wouldn't mind this so much to be honest (although I would have preferred an accurate battery meter) but I do mind is having someone speak officially from apple and lying again with nonsense obtuse tech talk about charge and discharge cycles which have nothing to do with this issue whatsoever.



    Just come upfront and say, we put 100% at the advertised 10hours battery life but you can get more time, but at much slower charging times if you leave it on more. Why lie, again?
  • swssws Posts: 44member
    The new iPad gets great battery life! I do not care how it gets it.



    I get three days of use out of the new iPad. I use it steady about 4 hours a day. I get OVER ten hours of actual use before I recharge it overnight. And when I do recharge it, it is at 9-12% battery life still!



    Props to Apple!
  • participantparticipant Posts: 12member
    I have good battery life also. I have brightness at 50% auto and using it quite intensely because I have all day to play.

    It's now 1:20am and battery is still at 32%. My eyes need to rest :/ You can't drain the bat in one day except you are on sugar.
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