'Bulk' of first wave of Intel's next-gen Ivy Bridge chips bound for desktops

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014


Intel revealed on Tuesday that the first wave of its next-generation Ivy Bridge processors will feature quad-core models, the bulk of which are headed for desktop computers, followed by a second launch of dual-core chips for "mainstream notebooks."



CEO Paul Otellini relayed the information to investors during a quarterly earnings call on Tuesday, as CNet.



"The first versions of Ivy Bridge that we're shipping are quad cores, and then bulk of those are going into desktops," Otellini said, according to a transcript by Seeking Alpha.



"And then the second launch of the products is in the dual core, which is the mainstream notebooks. So I think that helps put a profile over the course of quarter as well."



Intel pushed the Ivy Bridge launch back by three weeks in order to "make sure that there was enough inventory in the pipeline," the company's CFO said. The chipmaker is expected to launch its first batch of Ivy Bridge chips next week.



Otellini's comments could still leave room for a MacBook Pro release within the first wave of chips. Apple could potentially obtain enough inventory for initial MacBook Pro shipments even if the "bulk" of Intel's new processors are headed for desktops. Currently, both the 15-inch and 17-inch versions of the MacBook Pro make use of a quad-core Intel processor, while the 13-inch model has a dual-core processor.



Availability of 15-inch MacBook Pros has been constrained among authorized resellers, often a reliable indicator of an imminent update.

AppleInsider reported in February that Apple is planning a slimmed-down version of its 15-inch notebook that will draw upon the design traits of the MacBook Air, while a similar redesign of the 17-inch MacBook Pro is expected later this year.





An illustration of Apple's notebook lineup planned for the 2012 calendar year.







The lack of dual-core options in the first round of Ivy Bridge chips has led to speculation that an updated MacBook Air is not likely to arrive until the end of the second quarter at the earliest. The processors bound for Apple's next-generation MacBook Air and rivals' ultrabooks are expected to arrive in June.



[ View article on AppleInsider ]

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Comments

  • asciiascii Posts: 5,363member
    I also thought the MBP would come out before the iMac, but if this is true the iMac may well be first. It is well overdue already (by historical standards).
  • fearlessfearless Posts: 111member
    Er... A new Mac Pro?
  • MarvinMarvin Posts: 13,734member, moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Otellini's comments could still leave room for a MacBook Pro release within the first wave of chips. Apple could potentially obtain enough inventory for initial MacBook Pro shipments even if the "bulk" of Intel's new processors are headed for desktops.



    Apple's volumes are so low, I think they they'd have no problem with an iMac and MBP release. They only ship 1.5 million total Macs per month so if you cut out the high volume, cheap Macs like the Mini and Air, you are left with under 300k iMacs and MBPs each.



    By comparison, HP sells 5 million PCs per month so they'd need about 5-10x the chips Apple does for a proper launch as they don't have the same distinctions in product lines.



    I wonder if we'll hear about a press event this weekend or if this will be a silent update. I still think a 15" MBP overhaul would make the 13" MBP look very odd as they are advertised in the same lineup.



    To me, it would make more sense to update the iMac (and maybe the Pro) next week and then wait until June to update the other 3 models.
  • garamondgaramond Posts: 107member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fearless View Post


    Er... A new Mac Pro?



    I really hope so!
  • wizard69wizard69 Posts: 11,725member
    This just confirms that there will be few laptop capable processors shipping. If anything they will be limited to 15 @ 17" MBPs. Sad really but what can you do. Intel has slipped up big time over the last year and a half.
  • hoss the doghoss the dog Posts: 18member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fearless View Post


    Er... A new Mac Pro?



    Is the MacPro being held back for the new iteration of Thunderbolt, a speculation I heard on MacBreak Weekly today.
  • lemon bon bon.lemon bon bon. Posts: 2,102member
    So the chips are there for the iMac and the Pro now.



    It may be a case of stockpiling CPUs for a launch. But as Marv notes, Apple's desktop needs are not those of HP.



    In light of HP's ambitious AIO 'Z' design and the Pro's ten year old design I'd like to see Apple put its back into this year's models. We are overdue something after a somewhat evolutionary 2011...with no Pro at all that year. Apple have had plenty of time to design a more appealing and affordable 'Mac Pro.'



    It would be nice for a top end iMac to have a Xeon option or quadro GPU.



    Likewise, a cosumer/pro replacement that starts £995 and scales up to dual processors £2k+. How hard can it be to have a choice of two motherboards and a choice of desktop and workstation CPUs? With the same for GPUs? The Alleged Pro's problem is the base price which is twice its historical base price. It's one computer when it needs to be two. Most pc OEMs can do this.



    Lemon Bon Bon.
  • hattighattig Posts: 787member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    This just confirms that there will be few laptop capable processors shipping. If anything they will be limited to 15 @ 17" MBPs. Sad really but what can you do. Intel has slipped up big time over the last year and a half.



    In addition the roadmapped 77W TDP Ivy Bridges are showing up as 95W now - possibly due to minor 22nm process issues? It would explain why the mobile IBs are coming in June rather than April as originally planned.
  • jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fearless View Post


    Er... A new Mac Pro?



    Not likely. Apple uses Xeon chips in the Mac Pro and there are the Xeon Ivy Bridge chips won't be out for a while.
  • loganhunterloganhunter Posts: 85member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Not likely. Apple uses Xeon chips in the Mac Pro and there are the Xeon Ivy Bridge chips won't be out for a while.



    Also, in the meanwhile, if we see any iMac with a Xeon processor we can goodbye to the MacPro, which sucks :-\\
  • tpf1952tpf1952 Posts: 51member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fearless View Post


    Er... A new Mac Pro?



    When you make your living by the Mac, it helps to know the Pro will live too.



    How about it, Cupertino?



    Tom
  • mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Not likely. Apple uses Xeon chips in the Mac Pro and there are the Xeon Ivy Bridge chips won't be out for a while.





    Availability of the chips doesn't seem to matter much to Apple when it comes to the Mac Pro. They never updated it with Sandy Bridge Xeons at all.
  • loganhunterloganhunter Posts: 85member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Not likely. Apple uses Xeon chips in the Mac Pro and there are the Xeon Ivy Bridge chips won't be out for a while.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Availability of the chips doesn't seem to matter much to Apple when it comes to the Mac Pro. They never updated it with Sandy Bridge Xeons at all.



    The Sandy Bridge Xeons just came out this year so, if we're going to see a Mac Pro this year, will be with those chips. The Ivy Bridge Xeons will only come out early next year at best.
  • wizard69wizard69 Posts: 11,725member
    Will have to look that up.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hattig View Post


    In addition the roadmapped 77W TDP Ivy Bridges are showing up as 95W now - possibly due to minor 22nm process issues?



    Could be a process issue, Intel is obviously struggling here however it could simply be a competitive stance. I will have to see the new listings but if the 95 watt parts offer no advantages, such as higher clock rates or larger caches then it likely is a sign of poor yields

    Quote:

    It would explain why the mobile IBs are coming in June rather than April as originally planned.



    I'm not sure what the original plan was, I know Apple would have preferred to have the mobile chips first.
  • uk-macaddictuk-macaddict Posts: 7member
    Hopefully this means new iMacs first. They are due for and upgrade before the MacBook Pros
  • loganhunterloganhunter Posts: 85member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by uk-macaddict View Post


    Hopefully this means new iMacs first. They are due for and upgrade before the MacBook Pros



    Yeah... Usually the desktop chips come out first. It wouldn't be a surprise if Apple pops the iMacs out first.
  • hmmhmm Posts: 3,364member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LoganHunter View Post


    The Sandy Bridge Xeons just came out this year so, if we're going to see a Mac Pro this year, will be with those chips. The Ivy Bridge Xeons will only come out early next year at best.



    It's currently Q2 of next year assuming no further delays. I recall Sandy Bridge E was pushed back due to bugs/stepping issues. Given that we're talking about workstation builds, Apple (and the others) would most likely use the same logic board for Sandy Bridge E and Ivy Bridge E. It was the same thing with Westmere. To see a real advantage, you had to look at the top core count chips. The board design was the same with updated firmware. I'm a little surprised the other oems aren't close to shipping new machines with sandy bridge E yet. I haven't heard anything on Dell/HP. Okay HP has the Z1 coming out, but I didn't note any of these parts used in it, and some of them seem quite hot for such a design.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Availability of the chips doesn't seem to matter much to Apple when it comes to the Mac Pro. They never updated it with Sandy Bridge Xeons at all.



    Several in the appropriate socket type became available very recently. They were repeatedly pushed back. Appropriate Ivy Bridge cpus for the mac pro won't even be available until Q2 next year as i mentioned. Their release schedules are quite far off. I have to wonder if fabrication is becoming more difficult/costly for these guys.
  • kenaustuskenaustus Posts: 871member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


    Apple's volumes are so low, I think they they'd have no problem with an iMac and MBP release. They only ship 1.5 million total Macs per month so if you cut out the high volume, cheap Macs like the Mini and Air, you are left with under 300k iMacs and MBPs each.



    By comparison, HP sells 5 million PCs per month so they'd need about 5-10x the chips Apple does for a proper launch as they don't have the same distinctions in product lines.



    The difference between a low end HP and a low end Mac? Gross Margins.
  • mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hmm View Post


    I'm a little surprised the other oems aren't close to shipping new machines with sandy bridge E yet. I haven't heard anything on Dell/HP. Okay HP has the Z1 coming out, but I didn't note any of these parts used in it, and some of them seem quite hot for such a design.



    I've built two dual xeon Sandy bridge machines in the last month using Supermicro boards. Those machines rock. Every time I build one I wish I had the time to make a Hackintosh out of it, but alas they are all sent to the datacenter as servers.
  • jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kenaustus View Post


    The difference between a low end HP and a low end Mac? Gross Margins.



    Nope.



    Macs have quite a few proprietary parts. Power supply, motherboard, operating system, etc.



    That's why Macs are so much more reliable than HP computers according to most surveys and while people are willing to pay a premium for Macs in some cases (although not as many as you might guess).
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