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Posts by rob53

I gave up because the SEC isn't going to do anything about any of these supposed news bureaus or analysts spouting BS and not having to stand behind what they said. This is a case where the SEC should invalidate all BB transactions and see who sold right before BB came out saying it was bogus. There's your manipulator. Of course they won't do anything about it, unless it affected their pocketbook.
Since we're having fun with numbers, let's look at current Geekbench benchmarks:iPad Air 2, A8X 1500MHz, 3 cores, 64-bit tests, 1807/4530 (single/multi)iMac Retina i7-4790 4000MHz, 4 cores, 64-bit tests, 4343/16522 (fastest Mac single CPU test score) If you take the A8X, add a 4th core, don't increase the CPU bus speed, the single CPU test would remain the same (no GCD assistance) but the multi-core score would/might increase 33% to 6040. Now put two of these quad-core...
I know all apps would need to be recompiled against a new set of ARM-based api's but how many apps do you believe have NOT been designed to be multi-threaded? I'm sure there are programmers from major vendors that have been lazy when writing code and didn't add GCD but is GCD something that most programmers would simply use as a default or does it require a totally different programming environment to start with? I'm just trying to get an idea of how complex this would be....
"Apple has developed an iMac desktop with four or eight 64-bit quad-core CPUs..." Can Grand Central (that's still the name of Apple's multi-processor management software isn't it?) actually allow applications to use this many cores without adjustments made to the application software? If so, this would be interesting and would make sense since all supercomputers make use of thousands of cores. After seeing how small the CPUs are in iPhones and iPads, adding several more...
Actually, in this case it doesn't. Everyone provides an LTE-based phone meeting the requirements of that standard. Having LTE doesn't make phone manufacturer's phone any more valuable than another one with LTE. Now that Verizon is allowing voice over WiFi, cellular-only phones are of lesser value. I can see a time when the other cellular companies allow this and cellular-only communications actually go down in use. The LTE component is only one part of any smartphone.
You're all missing the point of this suit. These are standards-essential IP we're talking about, not something Apple has a choice of designing around. It's the same issues Apple has been fighting with other patent holders who are now planning on charging excessive amounts of money for their individual patents related to a technology they've offered their patents for to make it a standard. A proper analogy would be forcing everyone to use a specific bolt in a car from only...
My daughters early 2011 MBP with i7 and AMD 6750M only works if it never goes to sleep, usually. This model is the worst Mac we've ever purchased and there's no way to fix it. A replacement board might work or might not. Am I upset, yes. What can I do now? Probably nothing. The MBP lasted 3 years and a few months, not a great result for Apple products that usually last for a lot longer than this.
Apple used to have a government sales department, it more or less disappeared but I'm glad they've finally returned. To bad I'm retired. I would have liked to see the resurgence of Apple in this space. Resurgence means they were there before, which they were in the 90's and early 2000's but disappeared when Microsoft made a big push with junk PCs (still there but people are finally smarter).
The Microsoft-centric IT departments will always find a way to keep their jobs especially when anything from Apple is introduced. They'll simply require changes that keep Microsoft relevant whether or not it needs to be. I'm sure many of these iPads will be configured with the mobile Office suite and any other POS (different acronym) Microsoft app for infrastructure compatibility (Sharepoint, Exchange, AD, etc.), which will keep the IT staff employed. The big difference is...
I would say most of them are and when you add the problems many major companies have had with their in-house billing/cashier systems, it's time for a change. I know they'll say they just need to upgrade to a newer version of Windows but do companies really want to run a POS system running Windows 8.1? They can't just upgrade to a Windows 7-based system because Microsoft has already documented an EOL for that version so they'd be getting a soon-to-be-unsupported OS again....
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