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Posts by rob53

Historically, Apple products were never viewed as being short-life consumables but this article portrays the iPad as just that. A hugely successful product that's already done in five short years. My iMac is six years old and I still have older Macs in my closet that are still functional yet the iPad is now history because nothing lasts for more than an instant in this day and age (a very short age at that). This article is very defeatist, especially the garbage at the end...
Sounds like the next generation malware trojan horse software. Once loaded, it will act like Flash, Java, Word macros and all the other cross platform software that messes with your system and never really delivers anything of value but opens up your Mac to all sorts of trouble. I don't trust Google to deliver clean software that isn't trying to grab my personal information for sale. Simple as that.
Did some srfing as well and there's several articles from mid 2014 about IBM and Epic combining for a DoD medical records system as well as Epic being a beneficiary of an Apple/IBM partnership. Of course, the most difficult piece of the puzzle is getting non-profit hospitals (oxymoron if there ever was one) to actually spend money on anything other than cheap PCs for its workers. I bet most of the doctors use iPhones yet they probably can't use them for hospital work even...
Epic is supposed to be involved as well. Can't speak about its security but it's in use at a lot of hospital (for better or worse). IF Apple/IBM can get the Epic programmers to program for something other than Windows PCs, it would allow Apple devices of all types to become first-class users, thereby allowing medical personnel the ability to get rid of the garbage PCs they have to use for documentation. (My daughter has asked about using iPads at work but the way these are...
Debit charges either don't cost them anything and/or they can make money on them while credit card purchases always cost them money. This is why they push debit. It all has to do with their bottom line and nothing to do with the customer.
Unless the cashier selects this for me, I usually just put my phone to the terminal without selecting my purchase type and it uses whatever type of card I have defined (both credit, none debit).
Sounds like we need to come up with a list of POS scanners that work all the time, work sometimes, or don't work at all. We also need to know how the POS terminal is configured. I know some stores let you swipe your card as soon as the cashier starts scanning items. I don't believe Apple Pay will work if you try and scan too early. It needs the final cost to properly complete the transaction. I also wonder where Apple is involved in the process. All POS terminals go...
The only time it didn't work for me was at Panera because their POS terminal was large and the sensitive area was not identified. The cashier, however, knew what the issue was and simply had me move my phone and it worked. This is all about training and support by the service hosting each POS terminal. Home Depot isn't technically supported and none of the cashiers know what I'm doing when I use my phone but it works, except it almost always requires a signature. I try all...
Anyone suing in the Eastern District of Texas knows they don't have a leg to stand on but hope they can buffalo the jurists into going against Apple. If they had sued anywhere else, I'd consider their claims but not now. I know Ericsson is a huge company but LTE is a standard and as such people who want to use this standard shouldn't be charged more than a reasonable amount and we know Ericsson is trying to gouge Apple simply because they are selling a ton of phones and...
Apple is only looking for those companies they feel will be happy to join them in a new venture. NBCUniversal doesn't fit that requirement because of it's owned by Comcast, the new Ma-Bell. As for Comcast sucking up Time Warner, why is the FCC even thinking about allowing them to do that. Put those two together and who's left? Talk about an obvious monopoly. Put the top two cable suppliers together servicing 33 million households and you it has a 40% share of current cable...
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