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Posts by tribalogical

 People keep chanting that "it makes sense for business" meme, but I don't see how that's true at all. How does the subscription model make better sense for companies? In my view it partially (or completely, depending) takes over control of a company's upgrade cycles. Which means you're in a very real sense taking some control of a company's budgets and expenditures. For example: In tough times, a company may want to wait a year longer than usual to upgrade systems...
Oh really? Until one fine morning, you try to run "Subscription Word" and get the message, "oops, sorry, this software has been updated and is no longer supported on Windows XP. Keep your Office Suite running smoothly... Upgrade to Windows 8 today!" Go have a look. Is Windows XP still supported by Office 365? If so, it won't stay that way for much longer. Mark my words. If an enterprise "subscribes" to software like Office 365, it will lose the ability to decide its own...
"Software Subscription"? Nope. Not now, not ever. M$ has at last lost me completely as a paying customer. I don't use Office anymore. Or Windows. I use (the free) Silverlight for Netflix, and that's it. What a sad testament. Adobe lost my future business as well. Because of their subscription model, instead of upgrading Creative Suite as I would usually do, I'm instead milking my current version until it's no longer viable, and seeking alternatives in the meantime....
 Whether or not it had a "use" during the interim period is irrelevant to the validity of the patent itself. Consider this example: some of the methods Apple chooses to patent today might not be immediately "useful" in part due to CPU power not being great enough when invented, but then down the road after Moore's law presses onward, processing power makes the patent viable. I know this from experience. I produce digital music, and I can tell you that much of what I do...
 What a ridiculous supposition that is. You are trying way too hard to disparage and diminish what is in fact a very difficult thing to accomplish well. First, they didn't "patent what is basically a link". They didn't try to patent the (resulting) links themselves at all. No, what they really patented is an automated and intelligent method of CREATING relevant and contextual links from within text files. Identify, highlight, and offer contextual, relevant action options....
 Therein lies one of the inherent problems with "corporations are people, my friend".  A corporation enjoys all the rights of an individual, but almost none of the direct accountability. You won't hear of a corporation "going to prison" for a crime that any individual would do 10 years for... Drilling down and plucking individuals out for prosecution leads to the inevitable "fall guy" or even "patsy" taking responsibility for the corporate-person.  That's a law/definition...
 You clearly don't understand patent law and the trials related to intellectual property. At all. Why are you commenting as if you do? If it was as simple as "lost sales due to infringement", it'd be a matter of scouring some accounting ledgers, estimating losses, doing a little math and we're done..... But it's not only that or remotely that simple. It's about how markets are created, what the measurable potential is, how much momentum is lost, how much licensable income...
 I suppose that could be a compelling argument. However... this data is from the early stages of a nascent market, which has continued beyond the 2011/12 data points (as a growth market) for another two years. Samsung has surely sold enough across that time period to warrant a large-loss claim. Second, I had a background suspicion before that the 2012 "smoking gun" doc (and now this one) showing how "absolutely awful" Samsung's "actual sales" were, could very well be...
 More math... If it's true that "27% of all Chinese smartphone users buy >$500 phones", AND that "Apple owns 80% of that market", then it means that Apple owns roughly 22% of the entire Chinese smartphone market. If the numbers are right, it's pretty impressive. And they're only just getting started with China Mobile.  Another important number I'd like to know:  What percent of all Chinese mobile phone users are Smartphone Users? How big is that market today in real terms,...
DigiTimes reports..... blah blah blah.... *yawn*  wha...?   Click bait....................................
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