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Posts by snova

I don't think that is what mistercow said. I read their logic and it basically means there is no conclusive relationship. Not sure, why they did not simply say it that way.  If there was another point to be made, it didn't come over clearly.  btw, mistercow might want to review the version history a bit better before claiming that the past 6 updates were are security flaw related.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOS_version_history#iOS_7.x_3
you make a good point.  I wonder if cheap stakes who buy @ $250, make for good recurring revenue customers. 
hawkse, I'm so so sorry. I've always felt It takes a person with immense patience and perservirance to work in IT on Windows. I would not last long in that role. I have made it clear I won't help any of my extended family with Windows issues.  I have lost too many hours trying to keep Windows running and configured correctly, not to mention raising my blood pressure both for work and personal.  Regards.  Life is so much easier and calmer now.
we may be going off topic, but its been apparent to me that times have changed.  I've been using my own Macbook Pro on a "Windows centric" network for the past 6 years.  IT does not care as long as I can get my job done and don't get in their way.  I have a stack of unused company issued Windows laptops in a filing cabinet in perfect condition.   Can't say I'm special in this regards, its become quite common for people to use their own Macbook Pro's at work.  sorry, that...
You would leave based on cost of Windows upgrades? How much will it cost you to leave? The math would be interesting from a breakdown point of view.  Factor in the cost of buying a new computer and all the apps you have bought vs OS upgrade cost. I suspect you will just stay with out of date version of Windows, Office and any other apps you have bought. $200 is nothing. It would cost you more to leave. Staying with old out of date software costs you nothing.  I also...
Google has nothing to lose. All they have to do is make sure ad revenue covers their development costs of Chrome OS.  Its the guys that make these Chromebooks that are taking all the risk and bleeding money, like Acer.   We have gone from selling $4000 computers to $200 computers for the past few decades. What has this done for margins and fortunes of the HW OEM and where is all this going? Cheap Netbooks, Chromebooks  and Cheap PCs in general are not a good business move...
Marvin, While I agree on the short term assessment,  lets entertain Microsoft's strategy from a long term point of view.   Lets pretend for a moment that by lowering the price to 30% of current price, they are able to increase the number of cheap PC's by over 3.33x. This would yield the same revenue they are getting now on those computers.  For this new pricing strategy to be worthwhile, lets say they need to grow unit sales by 4x from current levels.  First off,  I'm not...
In 2007 Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer on the iPhone, during an on-stage interview at the CEO Forum with USA Today’s David Lieberman: There’s no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance. It’s a $500 subsidized item. They may make a lot of money. But if you actually take a look at the 1.3 billion phones that get sold, I’d prefer to have our software in 60 percent or 70 percent or 80 percent of them, than I would to have 2 percent or 3...
You make a great case for getting into the flip phone and netbook market. Not sure it's a wise business move however. Ask Nokia and Acer.
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