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Posts by wizard69

Jobs wasn't for or against anything, he was a marketing specialist and sold the product he had. It is a fundamental piece of his personality which apparently many people can't grasp but Steve was a natural when it came to marketing.Yep!Only if they can get very good handwriting recognition. It is interesting that Apple kept all of the technology Newton offered. In any event for the corporate types hand writing recognition would have to be very good indeed. For...
I suspect for Apple it will come down to Intel being willing to play ball and give Apple reasonable access to the silicon. Eventually Apple will need to place its IP on die. Let's face it Apple has already had significant influence upon Intel driving the significant increase in GPU performance. As such I believe Intel will do whatever is required to keep ARM out of Apples Macs. it could get very interesting in the next couple of years.
Im with you there.Im just not seeing a huge demand for excel on Mac anymore. It maybe a problem for some no doubt there, but it isn't a big factor for most of Apples customers anymore.Actually AMD isn't as bad as many make it out to be. Their next processor coming out in a few months is in many ways a better choice than Intels solutions if you are not wrapped up in the i86 mantra. The fact is they have taken cues from Apple and built in a lot of custom hardware to...
That is an extremely small concern from an even smaller minority of Apples customer base. Apple could easily placate these people by keeping the "Pro" hardware i86. The proof is in the IPad which has been a runaway success with ARM inside.Hey don't misunderstand me, I bought a MBP in 2008 specifically because it could run Windows natively. I ended up never running Windows on that laptop and as time has gone on I've abandoned all interest in running Windows on the...
DED gets it wrong again, the primary reason to go to ARM would be control over the entire silicon die. This to me is fundamental to Apples long term success. Of course they could start building custom chips with Intel as many other customers are doing.
Now that you ask, I have to say you may be right. I seldom pick up a magazine that is related to computers but will do so for woodworking, astronomy, electronics and other interests.Now this is a quick inquiry into why but I have to believe that one reason is that the editorial quality of these magazines went to hell. If I buy any computer related magazine at all it is likely a LINUX publication with articles related to programmin that may be of interest. Even many of...
Maybe they call it something besides "Mac".I think people underestimate just how important this can be for Apple.It may take a few more years but I do see a future where you can get MAC Pro like performance out of a fanless laptop. It is just a matter of some new concepts making it out of the labs.Maybe. Generally Macs are pretty good, however there was an unacceptable number of missteps with the last Mac OS release. If there is a real difference it probably has more...
That is rather old and unrelated to the discussions at hand. The fact of the matter is that these modern Intel cores do operate well above 3GHz approaching 4GHz all the while running on a far more performanc core. The only problem Intel has is that they speed step to those high frequencies and can only do so as long as the thermals remain in spec.In any event you missed the idea that new technologies are on the horizon that could displace silicon and lead to higher...
Modern C++ really isn't that bad. Neither C++ or Swift are excessively complicated if used with restraint. The way I look at it is that C is the complicated solution due to the lack of a good standards conforming library to the extent seen in C++ + STL. In my mind STL makes C++ less complicated in the long run. Sure there is a learning curve but you at least know that conforming solutions support the same functionality everywhere.
Sad isn't it! At one time I was really hopeful that Ada would take off, some of my first programming exposure was to Modual 2 ( in college ) and Pascal on a really old Mac. Ada seem like the perfect professional solution to supplant those languages. These days Ada seems to be relegated to Avionics and a few die hard fans that appreciate it's better features and abilities.
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