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Posts by retroneo

Wireless has such a great roadmap right now. HSPA is already at 14.4Mbit in networks today and HSPA+ 28.8Mbit will be running in many by years end. Still waiting for more devices to catch up to these high speeds that the networks offer. Evolved HSPA 42Mbit will be readily available in many markets before the end of 2009. HSPA+ also offers 50% increased continuous talk time / internet usage as well as these great increases in speed. LTE offers speeds of up to 326.4Mbit/s...
No... they have far too great power consumption. Even Lincroft, it's 2009 sucessor for the Moorestown platform is too high. The 32nm sucessor to Lincroft due in 2010 may be suitable, however the wide variety of low-power ARM processors available then won't have stood still (There are some amazing ones on the horizon)The Atom Z series ranges from $45 to $130
I would imagine that a future MacBook Pro would have HSPA. Apple could negotiate commissions from their existing iPhone partner networks worldwide. HSPA is in all countries that Apple operates in - WiMax is not. Hopefully they don't network lock it like the iPhone!!
Some people are predicting the demise of WiMax. While it seemed exciting in 2003, other technologies have evolved to take its place in its absence. It seems unlikely that it would be profitable to build a WiMax network in a country with several HSPA carriers. HSPA has a strong upgrade path ahead and LTE after that which offers far higher data rates, ultra low latency and very flexible spectrum allocations. WiMax doesn't have the coverage characteristics of HSPA/LTE meaning...
Both Verizon and AT&T are planning to roll out LTE in their 700MHz blocks. LTE is the follow-on from HSPA+, which follows on from HSPA (HSDPA/HSUPA). The 10MHz paired spectrum bought by Verizon offers download rates of 172.8 Mbit/s peak with 4 antennas on the device. It also gives peak upload rates of 43.2Mbit/s. AT&T bought 6MHz pairs. I imagine they will be running LTE in in some of the other spectrum they own too. They can run LTE in ever increasing frequencies as they...
It's probably 16nm. Some say there could possibly be one process node after that (11nm). I remember reading about "the wall" they would reach around 15nm perhaps 10-15 years ago. Quantum effects will make it unworkable to make semiconductor transistors any smaller. After that processors will find new ways to improve performance, such as optical interconnects on silicon to improve performance. These are being worked on today, but it will take many years to...
SRAM is used for on-die cache, one of the simplest features and first used to demonstrate a new manufacturing process. SDRAM is used for "everyone's" memory and is manufactured at 70nm and moving towards 65nm. Sampling of 65nm memories began only 3 months ago. 45nm SDRAM is a way off.http://www.physorg.com/news113668406.html
Project X/ Hotsauce wasn't at all like Time Machine/Scopeware. Project X really didn't do anything particularly useful - I installed it, tried the demo links and never used it again.Project X let you look at maps of web sites. No searching, no files, nothing chronological - the three ideas in Scopeware. Certainly no rewinding through time, no searching through time, no cascading of windows through time - all basic ideas in Scopeware. I can't really see much similarity...
I normally disagree with these patent claims. However, looking at the screenshots of Scopeware Vision it certainly seems that they both have a pretty similar idea (cascading windows of search results through time).I haven't seen this interface idea anywhere except Time Machine or Scopeware.http://www.arnoldit.com/articles/iwr.../scopeware.gifhttp://www.infovis.net/imagenes/T1_N...WareStream.gifScopeWare was a real product in 2001 (maybe earlier). It seems unique and was...
Flash Lite 3 would be welcome (which is equivalent to Flash 8). It can run most of todays popular flash web sites.
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