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Posts by KPOM

Not really. Sure, it's a lot better than last year's result, but the patents have value, which is what their counterclaim for $6.2 million was attempting to refute. More likely this puts pressure on both sides to reach a cross-licensing agreement of some sort. Maybe $2-4/phone net to Apple (less than what Apple gets from HTC, but over a larger volume).
What it probably does is put pressure on both sides to finally reach a settlement. The patents this time around were worth a lot less, at least according to the jury, and as time goes on Samsung is working around the patents more and more. Microsoft took a "license" approach rather than a "sue" approach, and perhaps we'll see Apple trend toward that. They've done that with HTC. My guess is that with Samsung it was personal given that they are a significant supplier and...
ReCode is saying the jury awarded $119 million, though that can be increased since it was "willful." So it's a mixed bag. Apple gets another jury verdict and gains a little bit more leverage in final negotiations. I'm sure they didn't think they'd really get $2.2 billion, given that they only got $900 million last time and this case was far more nuanced.
Another, far more realistic possibility is that the jury finds for Apple but awards a relatively small amount (something north of $38 million and well south of $2.2 billion).
 Maybe it was buggy and they pulled the feature from the RTM build. Given the demand and the fact that it had taken so long already, maybe Microsoft didn't want to wait any longer and decided to release Office for iPad before it was finished. Apple did the same with the iWork applications, making major additions a few weeks after launch.
I notice that Excel doesn't support print-to-fit. That can be an important consideration for a spreadsheet. Maybe it will come in a future update.
Right now Microsoft's licensing doesn't work well for the BYOD era. The $69 and $99 plans technically don't permit commercial use. That said, lots of businesses don't want corporate data on personal devices, or at least want to control it because of legal or regulatory reasons. The enterprise versions grant access to enterprise versions of OneDrive and other services that can pass muster for security and privacy concerns. But a small or mid-sized business is in a tougher...
While it's true that in the digital age records are more ephemeral, that seems to be changing. Office file formats changed a lot until Office 6 on the Mac and PC. That version survived until Office 2007/2008, is still supported to this day, and the new format is XML and open source. Also PDF has become a de facto standard that has survived for quite a long time. So there are some file formats that should be more lasting.
What if you are a single person who has one PC or Mac and one iPad? Why buy a license for 5 PCs and 5 tablets if you don't have them?
If this is true, then Angela Ahrendts' hire makes even more sense.
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