or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by KPOM

  You are going to be part of a niche, however. It's your prerogative, but be aware of the risks. Microsoft is heading in the same direction. Most users want PCs to be appliances, the way cars have been for the past 20 years or so. People generally don't "tweak" their dishwashers or TVs. They plug them in and use them. That's where both Apple and Microsoft see things heading in the "post-PC" world.
  My guess is that they want to force changes in the standard. Note that EPEAT rates the ability for regular waste processors to recycle equipment. It says nothing about a manufacturer's own recycling program. An EPEAT-certified computer that gets tossed in the trash is no better for the environment than a non-EPEAT-certified Mac that gets returned to Apple for recycling at one of its processors.
You can have a thin notebook, but you can't just lift an exact design. I think Samsung is actually safe here, since their Series 7 and Series 9 notebooks do look different. Some of HP's notebooks look like MacBook Pros, and the ASUS Zenbook looks almost identical to the MacBook Air, down to the placement of the ports and the tapered design.  
  I'm guessing that women will like the smaller iPad. One of my colleagues has the original, and she likes it, but says that she'd prefer a smaller, lighter design. A 7.85" design would have more room than the Kindle Fire or Nexus 7, but still be more portable.   Steve Jobs said a lot of things were bad ideas, or unnecessary, before jumping right in. Third party application support for the iPhone is the most significant example. 
This is gunning at the Kindle Fire more than the iPad. They will release a 10" version if they want to take on Apple directly. Perhaps Google sees Android's place in the tablet market at the entry level, with 7" devices selling for $200. Maybe they plan to let Microsoft and Apple fight it out at the high end with the Surface and the iPad. After all, Samsung has been competing directly with Apple now for 2 years, and while they have had a lot of success with Android...
Posner is a respected judge. I doubt that an appeal will be successful. My guess is that both sides just need to move on with respect to this particular case. It's over. There are plenty of other disputes to resolve.
  My guess is that the strategy will evolve somewhat under Tim Cook. First of all, judges across the world seem to be a bit skeptical about these kinds of suits, no matter who brings them. No one has really landed a heavy blow yet. Second, the Oracle ruling shows that juries are capable of passing judgment, and understanding complex issues. Likewise they may be skeptical of plaintiffs. Third, Apple is already starting to diversify its supply chain. LG makes the new Retina...
It was FRAND, so the issue never really was about whether Apple had to pay to license it. All the Dutch court did was rule that the two sides needed to strike a licensing deal. It was part of a broader lawsuit.
This is probably the biggest risk, and the biggest reward strategy. Ballmer has to have noticed that Apple went from near oblivion to the world's most valuable company in just over a decade following an integrated hardware/software strategy, while Microsoft spent the last 10 years stagnating and living off its cash cows called Office and Windows XP/7. If he succeeds, he'll keep his job a while longer and secure his place in Microsoft folklore. If he fails, we'll see...
Both candidates make gaffes and typos occasionally. President Obama's name was misspelled on the signature line of a diplomatic agreement with Then-Russian President Medvedev earlier this year. With 24/7 partisan cable news, Twitter, and blogs on you all the time, you are bound to screw something up. It's the downside of all the technological development over the past 25 years or so. No surprise that candidates are trying to make use of the upsides (more data to analyze,...
New Posts  All Forums: