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Posts by chadbag

 No, its not.  The context is Apple, which does not have deferred payment plans or anything, and whose "online orders" don't meet the threshold.  The SEC would not like it very  much, I'd guess, if Apple made public statements about sales that were not sales. My statement was not clear and could have been phrased better, but was speaking about Apple and in the Apple context.
From Wikipedia on the "Recognition of Revenue"   Since Apple does not offer terms, revenue is only bookable when exchanged for goods or services.  Commonly understood to be at the date of delivery (or shipping depending on the terms of shipping I would assume since Apple has no real good way to keep track of millions of individual Fedex/UPS/DHL/Yamato/etc deliveries.)
 Picking nits.  Since Apple does not offer terms, and does not collect the money until they ship (standard practice for this sort of consumer good), it is basically equivalent.  Merely placing an order does not allow Apple to call it a sale.  I can easily cancel that order right from the Apple website.  (I was not sure of the terms, but there is a reason I said "(for items like this)." Your car example is a bad one, since the car dealership DOES get the money right away.  ...
 In the world of the SEC, "sold" has a very specific meaning.  You cannot count it as sold until you have collected the revenue (for items like this).  So, for example, my 5S which I ordered a couple minutes past midnight Thursday NIght/Friday morning, and which is not scheduled to ship for another week or more, is not counted in that 9 million since they have not actually charged my credit card yet.  Once they charge the card, accept payment, they can count it as a sale.
 I've been running a Verizon iPhone 5 (bought at full price) using an AT&T SIM card since December of last year.  Never ran it on Verizon.   Bought it to run on AT&T since I was paying full price and LTE was not in my area yet anyway and the Verizon 5 (not 5s) had "better" LTE bands for outside the USA use, and it was an interesting experiment.  The Verizon iPhone 5 (and presumably 5s) have an unlocked SIM card. Scuttlebutt on the internet said it was part of an FCC...
 In almost all cases (in every case I have seen as a merchant), transaction charges for debit cards done with a signature are much lower than credit cards done the same way.  PIN debit transactions are usually even lower. For a company I am now consulting with, their recent quote for debit signature transactions was .7% lower than the cheapest tier of credit card transactions.   For my own company, the difference is about .5% (due to my business, the rates I have are lower...
Must be those North Korean Android tablets.  Which would explain why they don't show up in weblogs as well... 
Gold, really? Pimp / dealer / MLB version?
Regulations don't allow that sort of thing.  This is why you don't see Square or that sort of app doing PIN based debit transactions in the US either.  Having written an iOS based credit card processing client myself, the regulations do not allow there to be any intermediary between the card reader (swipe/chip/etc) and  the backend server.  The reader encrypts the transaction directly and the phone only passes it on to the backend.   It has no access to the internals.  ...
  I am not sure what country you are in, but there are some factual mistakes.   Sales in the US are allocated to the US Apple Store subsidiary that runs the Apple Stores (which may be the parent corp, I don't know).  They are full taxed on those profits.  As has been seen (Forbes had a recent list that put Apple #3 on highest taxed corps) and Apple claims they pay $1 out of every $40 in corporate income tax collected in the US.   For the EU: Sales sold in a physical Apple...
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