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Posts by alandail

 Some get the consoles for the very best graphics, others get it just to play games with their family on a big screen. The overall play a game on the TV will grow while the market for the dedicated consoles will shrink to some extent. I have two current generation consoles.  I have a Wii U just to play Mario Cart, which is my all time favorite game on any platform.  I have an Xbox One primarily for the Kinnect games, which there are very few.  I would rather play a game...
 An Apple TV with an app store will be cheaper, will play more games, a larger variety of games, and those games will cost less money.  There also won't be a subscription charge to play games over the internet, again making it cheaper. Apple TV is cheap enough to have one on every TV in the house, gaming consoles are expensive enough that they are generally aren't on every TV. The UI on the Apple TV is already better and apparently is going to get better still. Some people...
 It depends on what you mean by dent.  Apple TV with an app store will have more people spending more hours playing more games than any of the dedicated consoles.  The result will be less people will spend money for higher priced dedicated gaming console and their higher priced games. iOS with an app store on the small screen has already been so disruptive that Nintendo is now building games for iOS.  The Apple TV should be in the ballpark of a Wii U in performance,...
if they are taking a class in high school, you generally have at least 18 weeks and perhaps a full year.  Even the very first 10 minute example in a playground is going to be calling objects. My son is a CS major.  His intro class was C++.  They did exactly what hmm said above, they used it as C, only had him call std::cin/cout without bothering to first explain they were classes/objects and what a class/object is.  Objects were the last thing scheduled for the class, they...
 assembly language at some point to understand what's going on in the processor is fine.  Certainly professional programmers/computer scientists should have some understanding of what the compiler/cpu is doing with their code.  But not at the high school intro to programming level. And I disagree on procedural programming.  You can build entire apps without ever writing any procedural based code.   I will have to watch the video, but protocols aren't a replacement for...
 you realize that sends them to the Stanford course, not the course mentioned in the article, right?  Maybe I missed it, but I didn't see a link in the article.
 Those are the last things I'd ever do.  You might as well start them with keypunch cards. Object oriented programming is the first thing any new programmer should learn.  Why start them with bad habits (procedural programming) that the next class has to break. And what is the point in using less than state of the art tools.  Xcode shows errors as you type them, playground lets you execute the code as you type it.
 try the new mac pro track pad.  you can touch, click and deep click.  There clearly is difference between touch and drag (select) and click and drag (move).  The track pad doesn't actually move when you click or deep click it aside from haptic feedback, the haptic feedback causes you to feel movement that doesn't actually occur. Force Click could provide similar kinds of additional functionality on iOS devices.
 The phones became computers
 They have force touch on the apple watch.
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