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Posts by EricTheHalfBee

Pay the money Samsung, and if the patent finally does become invalid then Apple can pay you back. Getting sick of all your "drama".
 Again you've just proved how much of an idiot you really are and a waste of time, but I will respond for the benefit of others (not to you, since you're worthless). This requires so many things to be wrong it's not even funny. - First they need to get a print. As has been proven already, these guys who "claim" to have unlocked an iPhone using the "fake fingerprint" are all scammers. There are numerous flaws in their techniques. They need a pristine print (which will never...
 Find My iPhone is the same as Activation Lock. If it's turned on, then Activation Lock is on. If it's turned off, then Activation Lock is off (meaning someone who has your iPhone could do a factory reset and then activate it/sell it). In order to turn Find My iPhone off, you need to enter in your iCloud account password (not the phone unlock PIN). This is the best way to ensure a used iPhone you're about to buy hasn't been stolen. If the user knows the account password...
 Source? I have not heard of anyone bypassing Activation Lock. And it doesn't take a "savvy hacker" to resell an Android device that's been "erased". Any 12 year old could do it.
 Wrong. Google has ZERO theft deterrents. The ONLY thing that would stop (or significantly reduce) rampant theft of smartphones would be a method to brick the device. Thieves have NO INTEREST in the data on your phone. Phones are stolen, wiped and then resold for profit. It's the physical device they're after, not your personal data. Since Google only offers a way to wipe clean your data, and no way to permanently lock/brick a device, it's not a deterrent. Now if you can...
 Sshhhh. Don't bring up what this is really about - theft deterrent. There's no theft deterrent with Android Device Manager like there is with iOS 7. I highly doubt GG has a response to this feature even though it's the point of the entire article.
 Technically, but there's a difference between coding for a specific controller (the Android way), using a third-party set of tools (like MOGA does with Android as well), or just using the API's that come with the OS and having guaranteed compatibility with any controller out there. Many people might be familiar with MOGA and their products for Android, so I think it worthwhile to explain that things are fundamentally different in iOS 7 when it comes to gaming controller...
 Perhaps you'd like to explain why the GPU in the A7 is grossly under performing? Not when compared to other SoC's on the market (which is easily beats) but when compared to the previous 5 Series? Only thing I can think of is Apple hasn't yet "activated" the full performance capabilities of the 6 Series either by underclocking or even having unused cores.
A7X anyone?   I was surprised (as were others I think) that the new iPad Air still had an A7. Not because it doesn't have enough performance, but because Apple has been making X versions for higher resolution devices.   The 6 Series PowerVR inside the A7 is much faster than the 5 Series used in the A6X. If you look at Imaginations information it's several times faster than the 5 Series. Yet the A7's graphics performance is only slightly better than the A6X.   I think...
Saying games must be updated to support the controller is not 100% accurate. It implies devs have to specifically target this controller (they don't). What devs need to do is support Apple's new gaming controller API's in iOS 7. This will automatically give the game support for the MOGA and all other controllers coming out (like the Logitech).
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