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Posts by afrodri

He was working on the open source part of MacOS, so Apple may not have had a problem with it. Apple is very secretive about some things, but very open about others. They work a lot with the open source community on compilers (llvm) and the CUPS printing services, so they certainly don't shy away from being open when it serves there need. I think other people have worked on the Darwin/ARM port as well, there have been bug reports related to it for a while. e.g....
From skimming the patent, it looks like the slices are a bit more independent that most vector processors, in that each slice has its own register file, and can operate on a different thread at the same time. Sorta reminds me of the 'clustered' micro-architectures which were talked about for DSPs.
From the context of the article, I think they meant to say "accelerometer" - ST Micro makes accelerometers, and I believe supplied the ones for the iPhone.
Apple already does this to some extent, but what I find more interesting is how they pick and choose between existing components and still differentiate themselves. For example, they use stock x86 cores in the Desktop/laptop, and for the mobile devices license ARM's designs but extend it and integrate into a SoC. For compilers they build off the GNU and llvm projects while contributing back to both, on the OS front they clearly differentiate the most, but also build off of...
I'd agree, and also say that Intel _has_ realized it for a while now, its just that their attempts to break in to the mobile world have been flops. Still, you are right not to count them out. They are a _huge_ company which can take a brute force approach like none other. I remember the 90s when it was "obvious" that the x86 architecture was doomed and RISC architectures would crush them, and on a purely technical standpoint x86 didn't stand a chance. But, because Intel...
x86 has support for SIMD instructions, just like ARM. And both processors can offload heavy SIMD work to GPUs which are even better at them. You can argue which SIMD instruction set is better, but there is not much difference, and both are evolving rapidly. So we are not comparing x86 vs. ARM or x86 vs. ARM+SIMD, but x86+SIMD+GPUs vs. ARM+SIMD+GPUs.
Its theoretically possible, but Intel has historically resisted being a fab-for-hire. TSMC, UMC, and Global Foundries (and a little IBM) all work in that space and have the infrastructure for being a foundry. Part of the reason Intel has resisted this path is the same reason that Apple killed off the clones and avoided licensing MacOS –*by having vertical integration (HW & SW in Apple's case, Chip design and Fab in Intels) you capture more of the high margin activities...
A keyboard is hardly the only problem with doing serious code development on an iPad. To made anything other than a toy program you need to be able to open and edit lots of different files, and HAVE A COMPILER. The most you can use an iPad for is as a text editor where you would have to upload the files to another machine to compile and test (or back to the iPad if that is what you are targeting). So, for code development you would be shelling out $500+ for what is...
Probably too soon to tell. Even if 29% 'plan' to spend more, part of the reason for the Fire is to increase impulse buys... Plus, even if the other 71% don't spend more, they may switch some of their spending from lower-margin physical books to higher-margin electronic purchases. From the cost breakdowns I've seen, they basically sell the Fire for the cost of parts and manufacture. If they sold 1 million, and the 29% do spend $20 more each, that could be several million...
I think some of what the original poster was talking about may have been the hardware lines which apple started and then dropped, like the XServe and storage arrays. They were very nice products, but got dropped when Apple decided to get out of that market, leaving those customers abandoned. They did a similar thing with High Performance Computing on a smaller scale, where they had a few products and were growing a community, but then backed out.
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