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Posts by coolfactor

 Did the company that they bought have the full implementation done exactly as Apple has provided it, with the Secure Enclave as part of the main processor?  They purchased the company, and THEN enhanced the tech. It's not just about the fingerprint sensor, but how the full implementation and integration with the system was done. That's Apple's work.
Yah, true. Security of the implementation depends on whether or not those accessing the code have malicious intent. If the code is open to the public, then "good" hackers can contribute back fixes and improvements, while "bad" hackers may try to exploit those bugs. If the code is closed-source, then bug fixes would be entirely dependent on Google's own competence at identifying and fixing the bugs. But with closed-source code, existing bugs may not even get exploited due...
Yup, that's a good point. Will this be another "closed" API in their "open" operating system? I'm not sure how they can guarantee security if access to the code is broad.
Some considerations for my decision.... Apple Pay is not yet supported here in Canada even though we have NFC payments everywhere. Regarding 1gig RAM, I'm an advocate of memory-efficient software. As soon as we move to more RAM, developers will get lazy and stop optimizing for less memory. LTE support here is spotty, but getting better all the time. What might push me over the edge sooner rather than later is Safari..... it's been crashing far more than I'd like, to the...
So the question becomes.... do I trudge along with my trusty iPhone 4 until this new iPhone arrives, or do I upgrade to an iPhone 6 next month? I guess I can wait. It's pretty much the Viber app that frustrates me the most with it being extremely slow at reactivating when brought to the foreground, and I don't blame the phone's hardware for that... I blame the Viber team for making some weird app decisions, which I also see in the Mac app.
As you can imagine, things are not always as simple as they appear to be. Of course the bugs are not as result of the UI changes. I'm a software developer myself. Over the past twelve years, I've built up a software platform that is at the core of my business, and powers the websites and business databases for all of my clients. It's an extremely advanced piece of tech. Every month, I continue to tweak things, fix bugs, add features, and then fix more bugs. I'm well aware...
 Well, you need to realize, as I do, that this is about personal taste. I preferred buttons feeling like buttons. I preferred the flowing "water-like" effects that were unique to OS X. I preferred the former colour scheme. Is Yosemite bad? No. Did the visual changes make it better? No. See the difference? I use Yosemite every day, and I've grown accustomed to it, but I'm not blind to what came before it, and how years of refinement were tossed out overnight. I find your...
Many of us were along for the ride as OS X was refined over 13 years, improving with each release, including its user interface. So to have Apple throw all of that away for something that is different (not better, and even a bit worse in some ways) is difficult to swallow. Pull down the Help menu and look at the color that they've chosen behind the Search field... is that even logical? It was much better when it was blue. And the new Spotlight... sure I've adapted to it,...
Google's APIs are some of the most confusing that I've ever worked with. I haven't looked at their newest stuff. Let's hope they are moving away from the mind-numbing XML garbage that they had, and adopting more cleanly-designed JSON-encoded data. I doubt it, though.
Two words:  Apple+IBM That's a significant strategy that both companies are investing heavily into. iPad Pro will happen for that reason alone.
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