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Posts by melgross

You mistake gross margins for profit. Don't do that. Their profit on these phones is closer to 20%, which is certainly good, but not up to industrial standards, such as Cisco routers, with a 60% gross margin, and a 35% profit. Or Microsoft's gross margins of 78% and 27% profit, which would have been even higher if it were not for the huge losses from the XBox and Bing operations, plus the losing Surface and Win Phone areas.So Apple makes a good profit. One that is envied...
Again, you're pretending that this is almost all profit, when it isn't. So, it's fine to say that you don't mind that it's almost all profit, when it isn't almost all profit.I was a partner in a professional audio manufacturing concern. I designed products. When you look at parts cost, you are only looking at a small portion of the costs, often one of the smallest parts. Most products are priced at between 2.5 and 3.5 times the parts cost. That's just to get good, but not...
I'd have to look to see whether I said it here earlier, but normal markup for parts in manufacturing are between two and three times. This is what every manufacturer does. It's standard.If parts to manufacture a product come to $200, we can expect that to sell for $600, maybe more. But I don't rely on what those companies say, because they get it wrong so often. We read about Apple. Asking very high profits on some items because of memory, or some such thing. But none of...
I don't think they are.
That's no doubt true. I'm not worried about the SSD.However, there has been a question about the cpu. On my 2009 Mac Pro, the CPU's are headless. That is, Intel supplied them to Apple without the top cover. Supposedly this gives better heat transfer to the sinks. But it also makes them not standard.When anandtexh went to change the cpu's to faster versions, they blew out the CPU mother board. That wa because the headless CPU's were just a bit thinner, and tightening the...
It has to do with what chipsets they can use, so memory configs are different, etc. workstations are more balanced to do one major program task at a time, whereas servers use virtualization to run a number of instances at a time. That's for "real" servers, that is, not repurposed consumer machines.
I really don't care about what companies like IHI, iSupply or others estimate. They know so little about any of this that this numbers are little more than a joke in the industry.As for Apple's margins, while they are excellent, even the financial industry thinks they should be higher. And they are high when compared to other consumer companies, but not when compared to technology companies overall. Still pretty good, but not at the top.I was an electronics manufacturer...
The question of memory pricing isn't as simple as you make it to be. Apple uses fast NAND, Android manufacturers use slow NAND. Apple uses a controller similar to that of an SSD to control that memory, and their SoC has a fast memory bus.If you look at pricing for SD and Compact flash cards for camera, you'll see that the fast ones, needed for proper performance in many of the newest, and best cameras, is very expensive. That's the same NAND Apple is using. Check Lexar...
Server and workstation chips and chipsets. The chips a very similar, but not quite the same. The chipsets are quite different, particularly concerning memory.http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/chipsets/server-chipsets/server-workstation-chipsets.html
You don't need server chips to run a server. The Mac Mini is a very popular server for cruise ships, hotels and casinos. It doesn't use server chips.
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