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Posts by melgross

According to reports it was due to middle management issues. Issues that look more like Microsoft management issues. Hopefully, that will be solved by the time iOS 8 comes out.
I've been wondering how Apple checks these individual notifications. I highly doubt that competitors are sending bogus information. That's just too paranoid.
Again, I've not said anything about Apple either having, or needing a majority of marketshare, or usage share, though I doubt any of us here would turn that down. My concern is that worldwide, their share is just 15%. If that continues to go down, it will reach a point where there will be problems.That's all I'm saying about it, and I don't understand why people don't see that as a problem.
Yes, some of the current, at the time the iPhone came out, smartphones were hard to use. Win Mobile was terrible. I remember a lot of reviews of smartphones using it, where the reviewer would say that while the hardware was great, it was brought down by Win Mobile.Even the first version of the iPhone, sans apps, was a better phone than the others out there, and the second year, it was much better.
Me? Really? I'm not twisting anything. Third party apps are a defining feature of smartphones, like it or not. Some higher end featurephones could download a VERY limited number of apps that the manufacturer, or carrier wrote for them, but that was all. It didn't really count..Why don't you supply so e definition of what a smartphone is? No, not YOUR definition, but something better known. See if apps are a part of that. And no, I'm not talking about early 1990's phones...
Yes. That's been the sales slide for the iPhone ever since Apple went to holiday sales for the iPhone to counter declining iPod sales. But my POV is exactly that! I have no quarrel with it. But that's why we look at YOY numbers, to compare with the same quarter the year before the year before that, etc. When sales increases slow, YOY, then we see that something is happening. Quarter to quarter numbers are very interesting as well, because we can see is they're following...
A lot of what you're saying here has little to do with the price of the phone, at least at the $200 you mentioned. While it's true that Apple is working on those projects for iOS and OS X, it's not true for Android manufacturers. They don't need to spend the money to do that. Google does that for them, and that's an advantage they have, that is, the ability to hook into systems without having to pay for the R&D and other major costs.So, it's not so simple.
Just saying "wrong" doesn't make it so. And, of course, the iPhone IS a smartphone. I never said that it wasn't. But that first year, one of the major defining things of a smartphone wasn't present, and lots of people were saying that it would never happen. I'm on the record as going against the tide, here, and in other places, in saying that Apple would allow third party apps. Others were trying to parse SJ,s words as meaning that the iPhone would just be able to use HTML...
800 million.But you're making my argument for me. There's been a lot of talk about Apple having it's own payments system. Paypal has already approached Apple about being the payment provider. Other large credit card companies, and banks, are nervous.Why do you think that is? Because Apple has 50 million accounts? 100 million? No, it's because they're approaching a billion. The only company that has more now, is VISA, and Apple is growing faster.Size does matter, and so...
It isn't semantics at all. While you could run that software on those other phones, because it was possible, it wasn't possible to run third party software on the first iPhone that first year at all. I'm seeing a few people here being upset about my saying that the iPhone wasn't a smartphone that first year, but they obviously forget the arguments about that very thing right here, in the press, and the financial pages. The argument was laid to rest when the 2nd generation...
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