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Posts by melgross

Not really. People should read that book.Going by talks with people around at the time, as well as documents, it was shown that the Japanese intended to invade the entire southeast Asia area in the interest of, as they thought of it "Defending the Empire". What they actually meant by that was expanding the Empire. They knew the risk of doing that before they invaded Singapore, and American interests. They believed that they would win a short, surprise war against the USA,...
Except that that's untrue. There's a great new book out about Hirohito. It's called:Hirohito and the making of modern Japan.It's a scholarly work of 2000 pages. It shows how Japan evolved, but was formed from late 1880 through the death of Hirohito. A lot of what we "know" is myth. A lot of that myth was fostered by the USA after the war, and the Japanese government. In reality, the sanctions resulted from Japanese aggression, not the other way around.
The fall is interesting because the bank hike was designed to raise the ruble, which is what happened right after the hike was announced. The ruble rose by 9% at first. I wonder why it's fallen so much shortly after that. Russia's economy is in no danger of and collapse soon, but they are in a recession, and inflation is 9%. The biggest problem for them now, is that they're oil production is inefficient, with equipment that's not up to western standards. With most of...
Ooh! I've explained this some time ago. As someone who previously was an electronics manufacturer, I know secrets. Companies can claim shipped numbers that aren't really correct. There's a trick to that if they do sell a lot of product through some distributors or retailers, and so are friendly with them.So let's simplify this for the sake of the argument, and use numbers that are exaggerated for the sake of the argument.So a manufacturer ships a million devices to a major...
Not having read the report, I can't say whether it's them making the mistake or not. The brand name for the entire line of phones remains Nokia, not Microsoft. So Gartner could be labeling the line that way. Until it changes, but acknowledging that Microsoft now owns that line. But our writer should be calling them Microsoft phones.Microsoft has 18 months from the date of the sales to change the name of the line from Nokia to whatever they want to call it. Of they come up...
I see I'm beat in posting that here are no longer phones made by Nokia. it's Microsoft. Writers who don't seem to know the most basic facts get me bothered. I see this everywhere these days, even in the professional Publications.
I have a link somewhere, and if it's still working, I'll provide it later.Apple seems to have bifurcated their process here. The secure enclave on their ARM chip, which supposedly has also been modified, stores the fingerprint data, and we know how that works.But with the newer Apple Pay, they are using a secure portion of that chip for you credit card, and other information. I don't know exactly how it works, but it's why I've got the NFC chip in my iPad Air 2. Without...
I don't think you get investing, by those first remarks, so I'll let that go.But you don't get the rest either. When Apple first came out with Touch ID, it was called a gimmick too. Was it? Is it? No, it's not. As we all know by now, security is the biggest problem we have as computer users. Passwords are being called useless by security researchers. They are calling for more secure methods. Methods which just happen to be biometric scans.It's foolishness to think that...
Because it wasn't accurate enough, and was unreliable.This is a feature that must work all the time, and be very accurate, and highly secure. Otherwise it's a gimmick, and worthless.
Intel has had secure enclaves for ten years. It's not new.
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