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Posts by melgross

Of course, why should they be? It's just as in Animal Farm: all are equal, but some are more equal than others.
It's higher. I linked to articles below, in a response to Gatorguy.
You're wrong again.http://techcrunch.com/2015/02/23/apple-2b-on-two-european-data-centers-running-100-renewal-power/http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/mar/05/ireland-attracts-soaring-level-of-us-investmentJust notice the term "long standing" in the above article.http://www.independent.ie/business/irish/25pc-of-apples-european-workforce-based-in-cork-30487720.htmlThere's a lot more than this, and possibly I'll add some. To this post, or another.
So, when France and Germany own large parts of almost every major company in their countries, and bail them out every few years without requiring repayment, that's NOT state aid?As far as I'm aware, every country gives tax breaks to companies in order to convince them that doing business there will be less costly. Portions of countries, however they are partitioned, do the same thing.So who decides that their tax breaks are legal, but others, in different countries,...
What is it that you read? Apple has about 6,000 employees in Ireland, and they're expanding that number by several thousand more.
In the case of Greece, absolutely! The German bankers, which are the driving force there, which you would know, if you actually followed this, have demands that they know Greece can't fulfill.I'm not saying that Greece did what they should have. The conservative government there had, for 8 years, concealing major tax deficits that the new administration discovered. The Bush Recession enhanced these problems. But by requiring higher taxes, firing many thousands of workers,...
Sure, an Italian company. I doubt much will happen. We can look at these investigations, which are very rate. Hungry as well. Same thing for Luxembougy and the Netherlands. It's all nonsense. France and Germany are secure from any major investigations. And when some occur there, they are quashed.Several years ago, when both France and Germany exceeded the rules for a -3% budget shortfall, and we're supposed to pay large fines to the EU as a result, what happened? Nothing....
I can't quite agree with the historical information you're giving. You need to remember that Apple had a manufacturing plant there at one time, long ago, that was a large one, and administrative, and distribution personnel for the entirety of Europe. They still have everything there except for the manufacturing.Bah, tax avoidance is an interpretive thing in many ways. As long as the law is followed, then it's fine. What we're seeing here is the EU looking for more funds,...
In case you haven't noticed, Ireland needs these funds more than most other EU countries, other than perhaps Greece, which is being bled dry by that very same EU.
As far as I'm concerned, that's perfectly fine. They weren't concealing anything though. They were doing what the authorities allowed them to do. Even now, each country in the EU can have its own tax law. This EU investigation itself is somewhat against the EU rules. They are just miffed. Perhaps they should be investigating their own big corporations that are doing this, as well as putting funds in third world countries that refuse to acknowledge tax laws anywhere.And...
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