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Posts by melgross

No, their economy is really small. London supports it. It's truth that Thatcher did some dumb things, but she also got the UK out of a real mess. Most socialist countries have been forced to cut those services back. In some cases, substantially. These tiny countries you mention are all very small. Most just have a couple of hundred thousand people, or less, and very little land. They survive on tourism, gambling, tithes, and in some cases, outright support by a bigger...
It doesn't matter. These contracts are obviously out there, and that's all that does matter. And Apple is obviously aware of it.
Aluminum, stainless steel, possibly even the gold.Why do you want to believe that Apple would want to keep this a secret? This is the part that really makes no sense. If Apple were using this, they would be touting it, not keeping it a secret.
There are differing alloys of aluminum. They all weigh different amounts. Nothing new there. As I mentioned, there are ways of strengthening in them.There is a process for Liquidmetal that so e call tempering, but is exactly. It takes place in the mould. But it's not what you think of when you say tempering.Do you think that watch case now have 85% of the gold lost during the manufacturing process? Seriously? I can assure you that it isn't so.Platinum is more expensive...
You can be sure that Apple is well aware of this as it's been out for some time, and quoted from numerous times in many web sites.
It's been out there for some time now, and as the article in AI showed, there is indeed published information as to what this entails. If you read the link, you would see that it's Liquidmetal executives that stated, public ally, what the license entails. There is no question about this. It's a done deal.In fact, in liquidmetal's financial report, they told of this as well.And if you looked at the other link, you would see the first part of the license, where it explicitly...
I prefer the proper terminology when describing processes. Otherwise it's difficult to tell if someone has any idea at all about what they're talking about. Often, they don't. These processes are all well known, well developed, and are used for just about every mechanically made part in existence. The costs are low because they are so standardized. Liquidmetal has been used in very limited form for short run products that have been high cost. We're talking about tens of...
The first one I will link to. There are others. Note that it states "electronic". That covers everything electronic, as this is an exclusive license.http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/05/apple-extends-master-agreement-with-liquidmetal-technologies.htmlI'll add others as I have time.Here it the AI article I was referring to.http://appleinsider.com/articles/10/08/09/apple_obtains_exclusive_rights_to_custom_super_durable_metal_alloy.htmlAgain, an exclusive...
I would have to see it, not read some nebulous statement about it from someone I don't know. But Apple's agreement, which we've seen here some time ago gives Apple exclusive license to use this for just about any consumer device they want to use it for. An electronic, computerized watch fits right into that. Perhaps Swatch, if they really do have some agreement and license in place, can use this for a mechanical watch, which could be an entirely different category. But I...
Even the cheapest Liquidmetal alloys are very expensive. Much more so than aluminum or stainless steel. Producing products from them is also expensive. They don't grind out aluminum parts, they CNC machine them, polish them, and anodize them, or otherwise coat them. Those costs seem to be less than producing parts from Liquidmetal.Liquidmetal is liquid when injected into the mold, or at least in a high plastic state. It then must be cooled down very rapidly (a tiny...
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