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Posts by Mac_128

Well your assumptions are wrong. The phrase "No Need for a watch" means just that -- no one needs a watch (or an integrated car system for that matter) to use Siri hands free on an iPhone. But taken out of context, I can understand why you might be confused, of course you were reading it in context. It certainly does not mean I have not used an Watch similar situations. And I'm not the only one by far who has reportedly had problems with Siri on the watch, both with...
I don't have a car that does that for me either. And no need for a $500 watch either. My iPhone does it all perfectly by itself, and I don't have to move a hand or lift a finger off the steering whee to do it. The speaker and mic is far better than the watches, and I can hear the caller clearly over the traffic, and they can hear me. Not necessarily so with the watch, which usually requires raising it closer to the mouth and ear, which means taking ones hand off the...
You assume I'm using that as a justification. I'm not. I'm stating a fact. Everyone breathes air. Everyone carries around the knowledge they've learned in their heads. Companies hire people for what's in their heads. I'm not defending theft. If it can be proven that the employee knowingly took proprietary information to willfully give to a competing company then that's a problem. But the fact someone took an actual file, the information of which that could just as easily...
Taking such information in of itself is not a problem for me. When I have left jobs in the past, I take forms and documents I've worked on, as well as some that I've used. I refer to them in doing my new job when I need to prepare a similar document for the new company. And in some cases, I discovered after the fact, I had copied data that I had no intention of taking, but it happened to reside on the same directories I was copying. In no event did I ever turn those...
You clearly don't own an iPhone. I can currently access Siri hands free without taking my hands off the wheel at all. So yes, I think the iPhone that's sitting in the car as a requirement for the use of the Watch is a LOT safer than using the watch. And you obviously didn't read what I wrote, because it's not about glancing at your wrist for a half-second for the time, its about shifting your attention substantially from the road, and potentially engaging with the Watch...
All tech companies do this, including Apple. Exactly. All tech companies do this, including Apple. They lure away competent professionals for what is in their heads, not necessarily trade secrets, but experience they gained while working for others. That is invaluable information. If an executive happens to know trade secrets, its on the employee not to disclose that information. Of course, that information informs the employee with respect to their work at another...
If you need to look at your pedometer for two full seconds to make sure you're not speeding, then you should probably get your eyes checked.  The issue as I see it, is that any interaction with the watch is going to A) change your optical and cognitive focus from the road for an extended period of time. In order to see the watch your hand will have to be brought up to your face, thus changing your optical focus, changing your ability to see the road. The speedometer by...
 Sounds like it would drive me nuts. But I'm not opposed to Apple allowing customers choose this nuisance behavior if they wish. I'd like more customizable behavior: There are some texts I don't want to miss, so I have mine set to repeat 10 times until I dismiss it. But for texts from people I'm not interested in, it drives me crazy. Would be nice to assign this behavior to only certain contacts.
That's true, but we have a long history of knowing how much income those products represent in the "other" category. Whatever the difference in revenue Apple reports there over the same quarter last year, or even the most recent quarter, will be pretty much assured it's the Watch profits. Determining how many units sold will definitely be impossible.
Well it's not like I'm suggesting they shouldn't explore it. Apple explores a great many things as evidenced from their patent filings alone, and that in turn benefits the products they do bring to market. The 69% margin is what was widely reported after the teardown of the iPhone 6. But still 40% is an incredibly healthy margin compared to the automotive industry.
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