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Posts by Vaelian

And what do you propose as workaround for this that actually addresses the problem other than using iMessage or similar services?
This is not only common to iOS, that field predates the iPhone, and many phones have been vulnerable to that for a very long time. The "hacker" himself stated that this affected more than just iOS. I remember playing around with this particular issue as early as 2004, probably even before that, as the high-end Nokias and Siemenses already supported those fields. This issue is overblown, there is no real solution for it, and to blame a single vendor rather than the...
QoS is about traffic shaping, not bandwidth, and traffic shaping is all about scheduling priorities. When a network is congested, traffic shaping can make certain kinds of services more or less reliable or fast depending on their priority rules, so yes, traffic shaping can do both throttling and acceleration in proportion to the natural contention caused by the congestion. With traffic shaping you can effectively make FaceTime fast on a congested network by giving it a...
The sender field in the SMS specification is alphanumeric, an SMS central (or a user behind an SMS central that doesn't care about what goes in the messages) can put whatever they wish in there. Current phones (and this is predates the iPhone by a long time) support an additional sender name which obviously can also be spoofed, but to claim that this can be fixed by displaying the information from the sender field in the SMS is retarded. There are loads of SMS providers...
Dude, just realize this: the people who could potentially be interested in doing anything evil with this already knew of this a long time ago. I've known about this for over a decade, I had fun playing pranks on friends pretending I was the police a long time ago, this really old news to anyone with a basic knowledge of telecommunications, there is absolutely no reason to be afraid of it now. It's good to be aware, but it doesn't really need a solution, SMS is fine as it...
No, as I mentioned in the original thread, this issue predates the iPhone and is in fact related to the SMS specification itself. Yesterday's headlines were maliciously misleading and I truly think there should be legal consequences for that.
There is a huge difference between Apple deliberately deciding that FaceTime is too heavy for a 3G network and carriers deciding to rule on apps that use their network for audio and video conferencing. If carriers demonstrate an interest in charging extra for audio and video conferencing data, then they will also be also likely to ask Apple to remove any apps which traffic they can't block or classify from the App Store (the case of the app that I'm developing, which uses...
This concerns me. What happens to video conferencing apps then? I'm developing one myself and don't want it rejected because of crap like this. Furthermore, how does Apple accept this crap? And why isn't the FCC preventing this kind of shit from happening?
No, SMS spoofing (both names and numbers) is not an iOS-only problem at all and it predates the iPhone, as I mentioned earlier -- I remember doing it (the name spoofing) in 2004 as the high-end Nokias and Siemenses already supported named senders at the time. The number you receive messages from belongs to a central, which can lie about the number it relays messages from, too, so attempting to fix this by displaying a number in the message is as pointless as you are...
SMS spoofing is an issue that predates iPhone, and there's really nothing Apple can do about it since it is caused by exactly the same constraints that allow E-mail spoofing: trusting all relays between the sender and the receiver. Without cryptographic public-key signatures, which are unfeasible in the case of SMSes due to their short maximum size, there is no way for the receiver to authenticate the sender.
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