or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Durandal1707

I've shown that "app" was widely used just about everywhere pre-2008, from desktop computing to mobile computing to the Web, from the developer community to the user community, and I've provided links demonstrating it. Even Steve Jobs used it as a generic term, in the 90s even. You haven't really come up with anything effective to counter that.For a point to stand, you have to make a point first. So far, you've provided nothing other than trying to move the goalposts (to...
What relevance does whether it's native or not have to the fact that people were using the word "app"?Wow, that statement proves you're not a developer. I assure you that something like Google Docs or Google Maps takes a lot more time, effort, and skill to create than your average mobile fart app.I provided plenty of uses of "app" in many different contexts, including ordinary users on this very forum. You wanted something mobile. Mobile applications weren't widely known...
Don't know, because I don't have that manual anymore (kinda surprised I managed to find the Palm Pilot in the first place, to be honest). However, I do know that the API documentation for Brew (which was one of the technologies that apps used in order to run on old dumbphones like the RAZR back in the day) used "app" all over their documentation, both in the writing and in the API...
Really? Wow. Well, the whole "this term which was widely used by developers and users can become the exclusive property of one corporation simply because it was a shorthand for some other term" argument is too silly to comment on directly, so here's a picture instead:
Oh, really?"No-one widely used the word 'app' before the App Store. Therefore, it should be a protected term in conjunction with the word 'Store'. ""Indeed "app" as a word only became popular because of OSX and iPhone OS.""You may have a short memory and forgotten that, although not new, the term 'app' was barely used by the general public until after the introduction of the relevant app store on the iPhone.""It's true that app was a term used before, but it wasn't common...
The argument was that no one used "app" before the iOS App Store came into existence, which I pretty handily disproved there. The fact is that "app" has been a generic term for an executable for some time, and that "app store" is too general of a term to trademark.The important point to note here is that it's not just me saying this, but also the court system, because Apple lost its case when they tried to trademark "app store", not only in Australia but also in the US...
I linked you to a whole plethora of instances of the word "app" being used casually prior to 2008. If you'd never heard "app" before, you're probably either relatively new to the technical community, or just young, because we've been using that word for a long time. Certainly in the developer community we used it a lot of the time. Setting aside the whole "Carbon apps vs. Cocoa apps" debate in the early days of OS X (at some point resulting in T-shirts being printed saying...
"Application", which "app" is short for, has been used since at least 1984, as it's what the original Mac OS called an executable program. The extension for an application on OS X has been .app since 2001, and before that, it was the 'APPL' type code on the classic Mac OS. On other platforms, KDE-Apps, GTK-Apps, and Google Apps all predate the iOS App Store. In the mobile space, J2ME and BREW executables were often referred to as "apps." It was also used to refer to...
That would be like introducing innovative new horse carriages after the advent of the automobile. It's not going to happen.
USB 3.1 Type C will be able to do something else, however, that Thunderbolt has never managed to do.Get people to actually use it.
New Posts  All Forums: