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Posts by Durandal1707

I know, right? People who own Thunderbolt devices might leave the platform. Both of them!
Nope.
The prices in 2007 for both products was $79.99 (source). Today, the price for Parallels is still $79.99, and the price for VMWare Fusion has dropped a whopping $10 to $69.99.Both products of course frequently participate in promotions in order to compete with each other and secure market share.All of which would be negated by switching to ARM.Ballmer hasn't been in charge of MS for almost a year.Windows still controls something like 90% of the PC market. Windows...
I'm a software developer — I know the difference between virtualization and emulation, thanks. It is not highly relevant to this discussion, which is why I'm opting for simplicity in this case. The average Joe lumps every technology which runs one operating system on top of another under the umbrella of "emulation."With a change from Intel to ARM, we would get much slower speeds. Think about how your debating would have gone if Apple had switched the other direction at...
Mac's what?Swift has nothing to do with any of that.Swift is not a "piece necessary for a seamless x86->ARM transition."Xcode has been able to build for both x86 and ARM since 2007, and it's been able to build fat binaries since 2005 (Apple themselves have been making fat binaries since the 680x0->PPC transition in 1994). None of this has anything to do with Swift. Yes, Swift can be compiled for both x86 and ARM. Also, Objective-C can be compiled for x86 and ARM. So can C....
Why do people keep bringing up Swift in this? Swift has nothing whatsoever to do with processor architectures. It's a programming language. It has nothing more to do with Intel vs. ARM than what font Apple uses for the menu bar.
Oh boy. Ask most developers whether they'd want to be stuck with a PPC->Intel like transition period, but indefinitely. Remember that it's not a matter of "just" turning on the two architectures, there's always little nits that come up, so you also have to thoroughly test everything on both architectures. Not to do so is just inviting disaster.
GCD is anything but vaporware; it's a well-integrated part of the API that's been there, and working great, for years now. I think it's pretty safe to say that just about every major Mac app out there today is going to be using it in some capacity.Now, GCD isn't going to magically turn every single-threaded app into a multi-threaded one, nor is it going to make non-threadable problems suddenly solvable using threads. But for applications which do use threading (and it's...
The chart shows very clearly how Apple's sales improved after switching to Intel processors, which bolsters the argument.So this is you, basically:http://thecolbertreport.cc.com/videos/63ite2/the-word---truthiness
Translation: I've got nothing, so I'll just make a lame attack with no substance instead and hope nobody notices.It is a well-known fact that the transition to Intel increased Apple's Mac sales dramatically. Also, Parallels and VMWare are high-selling products on the Mac platform. I don't think Apple will drop the Intel architecture on their main lineup any time soon. They could conceivably do it on an ultra-low-end chromebook-type e-mail reader, if that's what this new...
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