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Posts by giant

It's pretty clear that the primary problem in that situation is whatever personality flaw makes you think it's OK to say, in a professional environment, that you "would knock his block off" and have pride in being viewed as "scary."
Oh, so you are narrowly specialized and an employee. Good to know.
Maybe. Of course, I've been an engineering student, so that alone can't be it. Maybe the scope of your education has been too narrow.
Where you work must be a small school, and it's not a question of equality or equal footing, it's about roles, functions and activities.As students.
No, while there are shared elements, it's more on the non-profit than for-profit side, the students' relationship with the university is far more complex than that of a customer/service provider relationship and trying to interpret what universities do from a solidly for-profit perspective is horribly misguided, negligent and silly. That's not meant as a criticism of your view, jimmac, it's a criticism of the statements that some have made here.Maybe there's a different...
Let me know when you've realized that this statement is factually wrong: and that this statement and the argument it was attached to (that students are "customers" buying an education) is completely misguided:
All of my experience is at private schools.The universities I deal with certainly are run like businesses. At least with Northwestern, about 1/3 of their $1.4 billion annual revenue comes from tuition, a little less than that from grants and contracts and a little less than that from investment returns. Incidentally, it being a saturday, I just received a call from my parent who is a financial administrator (soon to retire) at a major national private university. I asked...
Exactly.On a very basic level, non-profits typically conduct activities (providing services and otherwise) that wouldn't generate profits and, therefore, wouldn't be possible to provide in a for-profit situation. In terms of perspective, the difference between providing a service to generate profit and providing a service as an end in itself creates an entirely distinct organizational culture. In the case of a membership-based non-profit, the organization isn't necessarily...
I'm sorry, franksargent, but this is just absolutely wrong.My experience is completely the opposite. I have administrators and professors (primarily law and history) in my family (one parent is a career university finance administrator), I grew up in a college town, I currently live in a college town, and I've also spent most of my career working in universities, but I've also run private, for-profit companies and have marketed to both for-profit and non-profit...
As an example, an association's relationship to a paying "member" is fundamentally and categorically different than a business' relationship to a "customer." Library "patrons" are similar to, but ultimately fundamentally and completely different than "customers." And likewise for "students." As tempting as it is to interpret them as analogous, there's a core distinction that shapes operation and functional approaches on every level.This isn't pie in the sky shit, either....
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