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Posts by auxio

I agree with what wizard69 says about Swift: it's likely going to take the same path as Obj-C and be embraced by Apple only.  Apple would need to create a formal language specification (there is a book for developers, but it's not a formal specification) and an independent committee comprised of members from the larger tech community if they wanted Swift to be cross-platform.  I don't see the incentive for them to do that.   That being said, given what I've seen in the...
 A couple of other related points on the matter: - There are a number of fundamental differences between Windows and Mac UIs which would affect the ability to port a number of APIs.  For example, the menubar being at the top of the screen vs in the application window.  This makes a big difference in terms of having multiple windows in the same application instance vs running multiple application instances.  I could write an essay on all such differences, but I'll spare...
 It does.  The C++ standard library has different implementations of it's standard library for all platforms.  Generally, it's implemented using the POSIX APIs on most platforms. C++ is the cross-platform solution because the standard library (and most of the major 3rd party libraries) doesn't make any attempt to try and draw UI elements (windows, buttons, text entry fields, etc) or handle UI interactions across platforms.  It only does the low-level stuff which is...
 Even your example is using APIs which are platform-specific.  You're calling the function println(), but how does println() work on OS X vs Windows?  It, in-turn, needs to be turned into lower-level commands which can display characters somewhere on the screen. The compiler (clang) can do this for you, but it needs to know where to find the implementation of println() on both OS X and Windows (i.e. in a standard/core library which is created for each platform).  This is...
 Unfortunately, asdasd confused you a bit.  When I talk about the broad topic of "data-manipulation", I'm talking about how to structure, process, and save/load data in your applications.  Not just interacting with SQL databases (for which there are no APIs in the standard C++ library anyways). For example: say you have a cross-platform application which can save to a file and reload it again (to use your own app as an example: say you wanted to allow the user to...
 For that to happen, Microsoft would have to adopt Swift and port all of the tools/APIs/Frameworks to Windows (as well as the Linux/Android folks).  Either that or Apple would have to find a reason to do the same.  Neither seem remotely likely given that it didn't really happen with Obj-C + Cocoa over the years (though check out the Cocotron project for an example of what that would look like). The reason C++ is cross-platform is because there is a committee of people...
 In my eyes, yes.  It's what I call a "guru" language because there is so much syntax and so many rules that it's difficult for new programmers to pick up and become productive in it quickly.  The language specification itself is well over 1000 pages.  I don't really like it, but it's a tool I need to know how to use for my trade. However, I work with many people for whom it is their preferred language because they learned it first and know it well.  However, those people...
 A storyboard is just a fancy packaging for a bunch of XIB files.  The UI design work you're doing on each part of the storyboard is exactly the same as you'd do for a XIB-based design.  While it may be more satisfying to do up front, any OS X or iOS programmer that builds a UI completely in code is asking for a world of hurt down the road in maintenance work as OS versions change and they need to add/revise features. Ha, it was off the cuff, but it does fit nicely.  I've...
 Right, but Obj-C still isn't cross-platform.  Try to write an application that works on both Windows and Mac using Obj-C.  Even if you can find an Obj-C compiler for Windows which will build an application for you, you can't do much without having the Cocoa/AppKit/Foundation frameworks available.  Trying to write Obj-C apps for Windows is like trying to write C# apps for Mac -- you can do it, but you won't get very far because each language is pretty-much...
 It's possible to use bindings in XIBs with Obj-C too.  It's just not as readily visible as it is with Swift. For example, you can make a rounded rectangle button easily by binding the layer.cornerradius and layer.masksToBounds properties of UIButton in the Xcode UI editor.  It's shown in the second answer here.  Do more searching for making rounded rect buttons on stackoverflow and you'll see the multitude of convoluted ways people have come up with to do it.  It just...
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