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Posts by auxio

While I'd be happy about that, having car assembly plants in Canada is mostly based on a low Canadian dollar.  When the dollar went up relative to the US dollar, many of the plants were relocated to Mexico. And car assembly isn't like, say, filming a movie where it can be moved around on a whim.  It takes a fair bit of time and money to open or relocate a plant.  So my thinking is that, unless there are some serious problems with the cars being built in Mexico, or the...
 Or Mexican factories.  That's where the German auto makers are building their cars destined for the North American market.  Shipping an entire car from China to North America would negate most or all savings on assembly.
Or just hook your Mac up to your TV and display it that way. The AppleTV is obviously a consumer device, but the Mac (and soon the iPad Pro) are clearly aimed at the pro/creator market.  I think you guys are overreacting.
 And I wish those application developers the best of luck as Apple iterates on OS X and adds/tweaks menu items and behaviours which, if you implemented your menus via Interface Builder, you simply get for free.  For example, the Edit -> Speech menus which were added to all document-based applications a few OS X releases back. Sure it's an option to create menus programmatically, just not a good one if you want your application to feel like it was made for Mac going forward...
 iTunes 12.3 wasn't available through that link earlier in the day.  However, the page seems to be in the process of being updated. Edit: It's up now.
 I understand that, when the xib file is loaded, all of the menus defined in it are turned into objects (NSMenus and NSMenuItems with hotkeys).  However, within the frameworks which make up Cocoa, keyboard events are turned into standard actions (see NSResponder) and sent through the responder chain.  So if you wanted to have one xib file which defines your menus for both Mac and Windows, and then simply adapt the hotkeys for each platform, this is likely where it would be...
 The point is that, someone telling people how to use punch cards correctly seems pointless in this day and age where we have automated digital storage reading.  Just as someone telling people they need to learn to wait 10 minutes for their ISP to update will seem in the near future. At some point, instead of berating others, someone asked: how can we do this better?  And they did.
 It's how the current incarnation of technology the internet is built upon works.  If no one ever asks the question: "but can we do it better?" and just accepts that this is how it works (and derides others for not knowing), nothing changes. Idiots -- don't you understand that you need to have the punch cards right-side up when you feed them into the reader if you want it to work???
Uh no.  You set hotkeys in your nib/xib/storyboard file.  If you created that file in a Mac app, then brought it over to a Windows app, you'd need something to convert hotkeys like Cmd-C to Ctrl-C and so on. As well, many of the menu items have hotkeys automatically configured by OS X to ensure consistency across different applications (e.g. Edit -> Copy is always bound to Cmd-C).  OS X does a lot more automatic configuration to ensure application consistency than either...
 Have you ever taken a look at iTunes for Windows?  Apple basically created a Windows implementation of Core Foundation and other low-level Mac development frameworks so that they could directly bring the Mac iTunes code over to Windows.  So it'd probably require some deep modifications to the underlying hotkey translation system which converts Mac hotkeys to Windows.  This is why it feels so out of place on Windows.
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