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Posts by auxio

Some of us are at a Mac desktop for a good part of our day, and find it easier to check an RSS feed from a persistent application on a large screen rather than pulling out our phone, sliding to unlock, switching to the right app, scrolling forever because the screen is so small, etc.Plus I tend to prefer to check news when it's convenient for me (pull) rather than have my pocket buzzing all day with notifications (push).
The point is, if a major distributor is deciding what content to carry based not on legality, slander, or material which is otherwise offensive to their customers, but instead based on their own competitive practices, then I personally consider that a form of censorship. It heavily influences content creators to consider the interests of the people distributing their work.I feel the same way about news sources which won't report any stories that negatively affect partners...
It's a bit of a slippery slope though:What if, instead of a Target gift card taped to the cover, there was a redemption code in the book? What if the book simply recommended Target because the author likes it? What if it was a story which involves shopping at Target at some point?The same goes for Amazon linking. Maybe a direct link goes too far, but what if it was just a written link? Or just a recommendation because the author likes it?At what point does it become...
It's the A class, which is basically a Smart car with a 3-point star on it, what do you expect?
No, you cannot get a signing certificate for free. Try it and see for yourself. I did. I had a free Apple developer account, tried to get a signing certificate using the instructions given by Apple, and was unable to without paying the $99 fee. What part of actually going through the process of trying and seeing for yourself do you not understand?It's unbelievable how self-righteous people who don't truly have a working knowledge of things can be...
Which, now that you have to pay $99 to sign regularly distributed apps, makes more sense. However, I don't like to needlessly drop support for pre-App Store versions of Mac OS X (I have plenty of old Macs kicking around which I put to use for various purposes). So for those (and for people who can't afford a new Mac), I still need to create installers.
And some people don't like to have the OS decide what's safe to run and what isn't, but we're talking about what's easiest/best for the average computer user here.Installers put things in the proper place (/Applications) so that the filesystem doesn't become a mess (but still give an option for a custom location), can be used to take care of setting the right permissions, add the necessary things to run on startup, add system preference items, incorporate signature...
While it's not so bad for the first couple of times explaining it, it gets a bit tedious around a dozen times (i.e. you need to see it from the perspective of the small developer providing their own tech support). As for .dmgs, there's also the option of .pkgs (which I prefer to use).
Right. I was assuming that everyone knew that much already, but it never hurts to be as clear as possible. I'm personally feeling a bit forced into paying the $99 fee, but given that you get high quality developer tools for free (unlike other platforms), I'm not complaining too much.
Can we please clear this up once and for all?- You can sign up for an Apple developer account for free. This will allow you to get access to developer tools and documentation so that you can create Mac applications. This won't allow you to get a developer ID so that you can sign your Mac applications. You can still distribute the applications you create, but once Mountain Lion comes out, users of your applications who upgrade will have to explicitly change their...
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