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Posts by auxio

Actually, I was making a joke, but it looks like I'll have to be more obvious about it..."I'm not sure I can take him [Mr. Limp] seriously without seeing some hard data..."
I'm not sure I can take him seriously without seeing some hard data...
You can't just use any PC graphics card in a Mac as the firmware needs to support EFI (though it is possible to flash some PC graphics cards with a Mac-compatible firmware). Also, only the Mac Pro allows you to install a custom graphics card. Assuming those requirements are met, then Windows should be able to make use of the graphics card. When using Windows via Bootcamp on a Mac, the Mac looks and functions just like any other PC would in Windows. So the standard...
Again showing that Microsoft doesn't have a clue. How about an ad campaign that actually speaks about what your products do rather than nonsense and gimmicks? I don't think I've ever seen a Microsoft ad that I came away from with a feeling of anything other than embarrassment (for them) and a complete lack of interest.
Well, that's what everyone thought about the PC back in the early 1980s. No one could have imagined what you can get nowadays for less than $500. As component prices come down and less engineering is required to create a tablet, the costs will come down. I'd be willing to bet that in 5 years, there will be a number of tablets around the $100 mark. Not as functional or as easy to use as the iPad, but good enough for the low end market.
Or even better spent on beer (good beer, of course).
All it proves is that there's a market for low cost (low end) tablets. However, until component costs come wayyy down and reference designs are available (very little R&D is required), only companies like Amazon who can sell hardware at a loss (offset with an alternate revenue model) will be able to tap into that market.
It may have "existed", but certainly not in as well thought out and executed manner as the iTunes app store. Which probably would have led to it's inevitable demise (due to poor experiences for both app purchasers and developers). That plus fragmentation because every carrier would have it's own version of an app store (each with it's own uniquely craptacular experience).
Would have loved to see Steve's attention to detail used to hone cellular service down to exactly what it is: a data pipe. Eliminating the many sideshows (e.g. home monitoring systems -- I'm looking at you Rogers) and focusing effort on the things that really matter: quality of service and data capacity.
That's the part that truly gives me nightmares: carriers peddling software (similar to how they used to peddle ringtones and the like). Companies mostly made up of people who don't even know what a software developer is (and don't really care), trying to market, distribute and take a cut of software sales. So glad Apple won out on this...
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