or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by auxio

  Agreed.  Use the app store where it makes sense to do so, and don't use it where it doesn't.  Why does it have to turn into some sort of personal crusade?  One can certainly create powerful apps which meet the app store guidelines.
  That pretty much captures the difference between being at the helm of a company at 25 and at 45.  At 25, you still see yourself as an outsider with something to prove.  You're so focused on being different from the generation before you and setting yourself apart that you lose sight of what really makes a company successful: being better.  Sometimes that comes via unique ideas, sometimes it comes via the refinement of existing ideas, sometimes it even comes from shaping...
  But your example (the ideas which went into the iPad) is just fine by me because there is a real, tangible product which came to market with those ideas.  Thus, there is something to "protect" (i.e. the revenue stream generated by that product).   The problem I have is with protecting an idea for which there is no intent of it being used in a product (licensed or directly).  An idea for which the sole purpose is generating money through waiting for others to create...
  As someone else already mentioned: this is something databases were designed to handle.   But to offer a simple solution to this example:   user1 hits instance1.  instance1 requests a lock on code1, obtains the lock, and issues code1 to user1.  instance1 ensures the database is updated before the lock on code1 is released. user2 hits instance2.  instance2 requests a lock on code1, isn't able to obtain the lock because instance1 already holds it, and moves on to code2.
  The logic is: simply coming up with a bunch of ideas, writing them out on paper and registering them, then sitting back and waiting until others actually implement those ideas doesn't make anything vibrant.  And it costs virtually nothing to do.   To me, the whole point of patents is to ensure that people who invest a lot of time and money in developing a unique idea into a product (or multiple products) are allowed exclusive rights to use that idea for a certain period...
  It's not splitting hairs: should a screwdriver manufacturer be liable for their product being used to break into cars (and yes, I realize this is an old scenario)?  Or a chemistry supply company be liable for their products being used to create illegal drugs?   We need to see the act of creating a product which could be used for illegal purposes and actually performing illegal acts with those products as two distinct things otherwise it becomes very risky for a...
  But creating something which can be used for theft isn't the same as actually committing the act of theft, now is it?  AFAIK, it's not illegal to create and sell blue boxes -- only the act of using them to obtain free phone calls is illegal.  Obviously they serve no other purpose, though one could make the faint argument that they could be educational to someone who wants to learn about how the telephone system works.   Now, if Jobs and Woz were caught using their blue...
  There's also another interesting gray area (especially with LPs): what if the song is out of print and the either the copyright holder is dead or the record label is defunct?  I realize that there are provisions for transference of copyright, but if it's not legally possible to purchase the song, what then?   I realize that with rare music finding services like GEMM, it's easier than ever nowadays to find someone selling a used copy, but there are still sometimes cases...
  Ah, but there is a big difference between the act of inventing/creating a piece of hardware or software which has the potential be used for theft, and simply using it for that purpose.   The former requires a creative mind and/or hard work (assuming you aren't just knocking it off from someone else).  The latter requires nothing but the desire for a free ride.  Two very different paths -- one teaches a man to fish, the other simply gives a man a fish.  In the long run,...
  How do you know the person you're downloading it from legally purchased it?  Or that it's the exact version of the song (or even the same song period) which you previously purchased?
New Posts  All Forums: