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Posts by auxio

Would have loved to see Steve's attention to detail used to hone cellular service down to exactly what it is: a data pipe. Eliminating the many sideshows (e.g. home monitoring systems -- I'm looking at you Rogers) and focusing effort on the things that really matter: quality of service and data capacity.
That's the part that truly gives me nightmares: carriers peddling software (similar to how they used to peddle ringtones and the like). Companies mostly made up of people who don't even know what a software developer is (and don't really care), trying to market, distribute and take a cut of software sales. So glad Apple won out on this...
Sales staff on commission probably. Motivated to sell you the product which gives them the most commission rather than the product you actually need. There's a chain in Canada called Future Shop which I avoid going to for that reason (don't mind buying from them online, just hate the stores).
Bang on. People may not care about upgrades for a phone they paid next-to-nothing for, but should they choose to forgo a long-term (subsidized) contract, or not have the option of a subsidized phone, you bet they'll start paying attention to which phones which will last them longer (either that or they'll have to settle for older/cheaper models).
Those two sentences illustrate the definition of the word "Pro" in Mac Pro: someone who uses a computer to create saleable content/services for their job or business. Notice how the apps which fit in that category (Aperture, video encoding tools, Final Cut, Logic, Xcode, etc) take full advantage of the Mac Pro hardware...
I've had my Mac Pro (dual quad core Xeon) for 3.5 years and it's still a top-notch machine which stacks up well against the latest iMacs. It would be very hard to duplicate that longevity with a Mac Mini or iMac. Here's the appeal of the Mac Pro for me: - Top of the line components which will be good for around 3-5 years. Even though the initial cost is high, you save on the fact that you don't need to get a new one for at least 3 years (in my experience). - Easy to...
I completely understand (re: inheriting infrastructure).My point is that IT people blame Apple for not working with Active Directory well, when I'm fairly certain that most of the problems come from the fact that Microsoft doesn't make it easy for others to work well with it (it's not in their best interest). That's why it's incumbent on those who choose network infrastructure to evaluate all of the options so that they don't get locked into a solution which doesn't scale...
Software developer here (who has created software for just about every operating system ever made in the last 30 years).The real issue I find is that, the decision making process for what network infrastructure technology to use at companies seems to get hijacked by people who only know Microsoft. And that's what the real problem is: choosing a technology which doesn't scale well across different types of hardware and operating systems. What if you want to integrate a...
Maybe he had been doing it for a year or so before his dad found out?
Yeah - I always loved the childlike simplicity and sense of humour the early video game designers had. I still remember getting freaked out as a young child in the arcade when one of the machines would say "Coins detected in pocket" in a synthesized voice as you passed by it (Berzerk). Anyways, really enjoying the book. The early 70s sounded like a great time to be coming of age in the tech industry.
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