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Posts by auxio

I remember coming to the same realization when I was quite young and one of my relatives was really into Jimmy Swaggart. I'd try to find the point of what he was talking about, but there wasn't one. Just meaningless banter expressed with great enthusiasm and oratory skill. After I understood that, I started to have more fun analyzing the techniques he was using to hypnotize people. So I think you can trace the origins of this app back even further with spiritual...
I'm thinking Blackberry OS around 3 years ago. Wasn't the Blackberry dev kit very expensive and limited in availability (much like game console dev kits)?And I definitely remember hearing from other smartphone users over the years that major OS updates often required newer hardware. Or, at the very least, the older hardware couldn't take advantage of the newer OS features.Aside from Bluetooth, the original iPhone supports pretty much every feature of the latest iPhone OS.
The app store is mainly about Apple building a platform. So it's no surprise that they are trying to run it at break even. If they made the entry-point for iPhone OS development too high, it would severely limit it's growth as a platform. Consider that most "smart phones" (for lack of a better term) which came before the iPhone were closed systems. Typically running a custom-developed operating system with very limited support for 3rd parties to create software for...
Yes! The direction of moving to all applications needing to be signed and approved by the platform maker is a scary one. Think about these scenarios:Platform maker is partnered with a large entertainment company - thus you can't create an application which plays DRM-free audio/videoPlatform maker is partnered with a large cellular service provider - thus you can't create a VoIP application which works over any networkPlatform maker partnered with a large TV service...
And reading up about how to actually do the workaround, then taking the time to do it. The one other thing I've mentioned in this forum before is that, if a component in your Hackintosh fails, then you'll need to deal with the tech support for the manufacturer directly, file an RMA case, ship the component back on your own dime, then wait 4-8 weeks for a replacement. As compared to taking your Mac down to your local Apple Store and having the component replaced for you on...
Exactly! I think Moto's ad is effective, but in the wrong demographic. People who buy into the marketing line that personal appeal is directly tied to the aesthetics of the things they own generally aren't in the income bracket to be able to afford high-end devices requiring expensive service plans (i.e. good analytical skills generally go hand-in-hand with higher salaries -- nepotism and lineage aside).
I've considered a Hackintosh for my personal computer. The only problem is that, for every software update, you need to:Wait to find out whether it breaks Hackintoshes or not (do research on related websites/blogs/forums/IRC channels/etc) If it does break Hackintoshes, then you need to wait until someone's found a workaround for the issue (again, watching related websites/blogs/forums/IRC channels/etc) Potentially follow a highly technical set of steps to do the...
Is this what now passes for "culture" in the world of people who only work, hole themselves up in suburban dwellings at night, and go to shopping malls on weekends? God, I feel so out of touch with the world of vacuous consumerism...
Speaking as someone who has actually created software to use the built-in multitouch features on both Windows 7 and Mac OS X, this is a flat-out lie.Both Windows 7 and Mac OS X provide ways to use multitouch at the OS level. In fact, Mac OS X has had this ever since the multitouch trackpad came out (circa Tiger I believe). So Windows 7 is actually lagging a bit behind.As for using a screen rather than a trackpad, it's splitting hairs at that point. I've tried many...
I want to live in a world where software and hardware designers are paid as little as possible so that we can all have the cheapest computers. Not to mention zero innovation because it's much cheaper to just copy what's already been done than to invest in R&D for new products (ala the multitude of iPhone knockoffs). I'm not saying that the "Apple tax" completely goes into hiring highly skilled engineers and R&D, but I'd be willing to bet a good chunk of it does when you...
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