or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by auxio

I agree.  A workstation class machine needs to have that macho factor to it.  If you can't lift it, you don't need it.
I don't think it's possible to combine more confusing jargon and technology which no one really cares about into one app description.  Just tell people what it does and why they should care, not what it's made out of.
This quote is the essence of what frustrates me about pure left brain thinkers (who make up the vast majority of people in executive positions these days): because they don't comprehend the creative process, and don't pay attention to details, they assign no value to it.   I guess maintaining this position is self serving because it allows you to pull a ridiculous salary/benefits off the backs of the people who are truly innovating and creating value.  Unfortunately,...
    Yes, but I'd say your perspective is a bit skewed because you work in IT.  Honestly, tell me how many average Mac users would know to find the true network path for the M: drive (or whatever Windows network drives/shares are set up at a Microsoft shop)?   Sure the IT department could set up scripts which automatically mount those shares for them on login.  But again, other people who only use Windows will be using drive letters to tell people where to get things on...
    Are you seriously that naive to think that Macs don't require IT support when placed on a Microsoft-centric network?  Here's a couple of examples which would require IT support for the average Mac user in my workplace:   1) Someone who has only ever used Windows sends out an email with a link to get a file off the M: drive. 2) You need to fill out a company form/timesheet on an intranet website which only works in Internet Explorer.   My point was definitely limited...
    Security is only part of the picture.  IT departments also want "easy to manage/support".  That's where Apple's model shines over Google's.   On the Android side of things, too many cooks means too many people passing the buck (or dropping the ball) when things go wrong.  With Apple, it's a one-stop shop no matter what the problem.
    All percentages like this show is that a lot of people use one or more of the following rationale when deciding what computer to purchase:   1) Which one is cheapest? (i.e. I only think about the initial cost, not the long term maintenance and frustration/time waste costs) 2) Which one do I already know? (i.e. conservatism, not interested in trying new things) 3) Which one does everyone else I know use? (i.e. safety in numbers, groupthink)   They say nothing about...
Ah hardware companies... I think too many of them took Alan Kay's quote about being "serious about software" to mean that they can just design hardware and do a half-arsed job on the software side. I had the exact same experience writing drivers for Linux about 10 years ago (even as part of commercial projects).Linux survives because it's an easy system for comp sci students to tinker with.That's why I got into it - it was easy to download and install on the "built from...
Apple's JRE implementation predates OpenJDK by a long shot. I remember working with Apple's engineers at the WWDC in 2003 tracking down JRE bugs via gdb, and their implementation looked significantly different from others I'd worked with before at the time (notably the Linux Blackdown implementation). It was mostly done in Objective-C and Cocoa. Which is how they were able to create the Cocoa-Java bridge (popular at the time, but now defunct).Before you get all high and...
Let's clear up the misconceptions here:Java is a programming language plus a specification of a runtime environment in which programs written using the Java programming language will run. The key word there is "specification".On each operating system, a Java runtime developer/maintainer uses that specification as the basis for creating a runtime environment (for the purpose of allowing Java applications to be run on that operating system).So, if security holes exist in...
New Posts  All Forums: