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Posts by auxio

Finally a comment I (mostly) agree with. Pegatron was able to purchase manufacturing equipment and perfect that assembly process with the investments Apple made (and expertise they loaned), so Apple should be able to curtail who benefits from that assembly line. However, the comment about commies is hilarious. This situation is one of the purest examples of capitalism you can find. Pegatron now has an assembly line which can produce MacBook Airs, why wouldn't they try to...
I was just about to post the same URL. The phrase "damn you autocorrect" is now used when anything doesn't work properly in our household. I guess it's not a prerequisite that a technology actually work well for it to be patented.
Keep the educated people away from the workers who don't know better. And while we're at it, make sure to filter out internet content relating to human rights and labour laws. Ignorance is what greases the machine.
For the average person, I believe it has eroded in the past 25 years. I'd have to find the link, but I'm sure I've seen a statistic which shows that, accounting for inflation in cost of living, the average person is making less today than they did in the early 1980s. And I'm fairly certain people are working more hours these days.Yet I remember a time when a Macintosh cost around $5k, and people who really wanted one would find a way. They would just forgo other things...
If someone so chooses to work those hours, then they should have the right to (and try to be compensated for it if that's their motivation). I have no problem with that, and nor should anyone judge them for choosing to live that way.The key word here is "choice". It should be a choice, not an expectation. And that's where the problem here lies: in many cases, if people don't choose to work those kind of hours, someone else will be hired in their place. Either that or...
Sure, I have no problem with workers in these countries having options at a better future (relative to conditions previously). This is exactly what has happened over the past 100 years in the western world.The problem I see is that the standard of living for the average worker in the western world is eroding at a far quicker rate than the standard of living is increasing for workers in countries such as China. Which means that, with the global picture in mind, we're...
Yeah, I guess they do have a choice to work for one company which has terrible conditions or another one with the same (or worse).I'm guessing that it's a vicious cycle in these areas of China: the older members of the family can't work anymore, and have no pension or savings. So the younger members must start work as early as possible to support the family. Thus, they are unable to get higher education. And during their working years, they only make enough to support...
That perfectly satisfies the criteria I outlined in my previous post for America to be able to compete:Just exchange the term "company" with "prison".
Agreed. Even though I argue against the nonsense which expects everyone to work the same way as people do in these factories, I also argue that it's bigger than any one company. It's essentially a problem with the basis for the lifestyle we've come to expect in the western world -- we want to be able to get everything for as cheap as possible, but we also want to be paid well enough to afford everything we want. Unfortunately, that logic just doesn't work. So yes, many...
Let's keep the downward spiral going and try to compete with them in order to bring those jobs back: let's go for 80 hours a week at the lowest wage possible, sleeping in company dorm rooms, eating company meals, no benefits, and no time off for family life or vacations. All the while praying we don't get cancer or some other illness which makes it impossible to work.And in our spare waking hours, we might catch a glimpse of the sons & daughters of the people who own the...
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