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Posts by auxio

For me, it is unless Apple has amended Web 2.0 to allow for tracking multiple contact points. That's the distinguishing feature of the iPhone, and developers should be given some way to access it. Otherwise the iPhone is no different from any other smartphone currently out there.
Developers can already use the Intel compiler with Xcode if they want to.
Yup, I totally agree. iPhone is just a portable Dashboard as far as application developers are concerned.The only really interesting applications are developed by Apple itself (ie. Mail, Safari, iTunes, iCal).
It's quite an interesting position: you prefer the use of Intel's compiler over a 3rd party one, yet you don't prefer the use of the OS maker's IDE over a 3rd party one. My guess is that your position is pro-business motivated since both gcc and Xcode are free tools which have cut into the markets of commercial tools. Whereas I prefer tools based on a balance between quality and longevity (regardless of being free or commercial).I'd personally avoid Intel's compiler...
I think it's mainly the Adobe developers who are whining. And it's likely because of a couple reasons:1) They've been developing in the same environment for about 15 years now and I can only imagine how much leverage they had with Metrowerks to get it customized in every way they needed. I'm sure Apple worked with them a lot as well, but Apple is a much bigger company and has other priorities.While I agree that Xcode is likely much less mature than Codewarrior was/is...
How about crash, then file corruption/loss upon restart? To me, that's unacceptable. I'm hoping that using Bootcamp will become like fast user switching (put one OS to sleep, switch to the other). If not, then my second hope is for a release version of VMWare Fusion at WWDC.
That's speaking from having used 5 different IDEs and 5 different programming languages with a multitude of development frameworks/libraries (some bleeding-edge, some well-estabilished) on the same project over the past 10 years. Technology changes, company directions change, requirements change. If your tools can't keep up with your needs, it's a real pain to keep switching.I only use 3rd party IDEs when developing in OS-independent programming languages/platforms like...
No, but I'm sure that it's the similar to Mac in the sense that, whenever MS develops a new technology (eg. C# or some of the new Aero UI enhancements), support in you're 3rd party IDE is going to lag (or possibly never come depending on how specialized the audience is).In my experience, I've found that it's always better in the long run to go with the tools provided by the company which created the OS (Linux aside of course). Though I can't speak for Mac OS prior to X. ...
I'm one of the few developers who uses/develops with an almost identical codebase on Mac, Windows, and Linux, (very large -- at least a few thousand files) and I can honestly say that Visual Studio .NET 2003 (haven't upgraded to 2005 yet) is just as incomprehensible (and even moreso in a number of ways).I mean, people talk about the confusing/hidden settings in XCode, try changing the settings in Visual Studio. First you have the multitude of global settings in...
I gave up on Parallels the other day after a spontaneous crash (one of many) finally ended up corrupting some files I was working on. I'm hoping Apple comes out with a "quick switch" mode for Bootcamp.
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