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Posts by Blah64

 Bingo!  At least someone here knows Pearson. If there are any ethics violations to be found, Pearson should be at the head of the list of all suspects.  They use all manner of pressure, subterfuge and political shenanigans to weasel their way into school district pocketbooks.   And to a pet peeve of my own, they weasel their way into children's personal information as well: Pearson's Creepy Vision For the Future of Education Confirms ... Seriously, if you have kids, read...
 Oh, and if there's one thing everyone should be concerned with regarding data mining, it's location tracking.  If you think about what kind of data could be easily abused in bad ways, knowing your travel patterns is near the top of the list!  The thing is, there are many different ways this kind of data can be built, but I'm not going down that path today, have other stuff I need to do.
Okay, fine, sort of. You said: "some basic biometrics being recorded by an Apple device that then gets stored in your iPhone's Health app and synced with iCloud", and then followed that with "I really can't wait until my iPhone tells me I should make an appointment with my primary care physician in much the same way my car has a service engine light; and then when i go in there he'll have a synopsis of the information of my biometrics..."So technically, they weren't in...
 I wish everyone would stop focusing on ads.  Whether or not we see ads is irrelevant to the issues surrounding personal privacy.  I don't care if Google showed me targeted (NOT personalized) ads on every page I ever read, online and offline.  What matters, and what is borderline immoral, is the data collection that makes them more efficient at their delivery. Ads are transient.  They're not damaging, other than they may distract you momentarily from your reading. Data...
 Oh, and one last comment for now.  Any large-scale data like this WILL be compromised, eventually.  It's not a question of if.  There are always many different attack vectors, and if the quantity or value of the data is high enough or interesting enough, it will absolutely be compromised. If it is compromised, what is the likelihood that it will be used for nefarious purposes?  That's a separate question, but given the nature of what it takes to get this kind of data, I'd...
 This.  I think there will be very careful dancing around the designation of "medical device" and what kind of data (vs. analysis) will be allowed (and by whom).  As I've mentioned above, I think there will be new legal issues to sort out as these types of devices and sensors evolve. And This!  Brilliant.  Let me connect the final dots on this one.  I've long thought about other devices and how they work into this type of process (like 24/7 GPS-tracking devices for auto...
 I know you're a techie, but I guess you may be farther down the it's-okay-to-watch-me-24/7 path than I thought you were. You described the first situation in a very narrow way: "basic biometrics" (what is basic/okay with you vs. what wouldn't be okay?), "an Apple device" (as I mentioned, many, many companies will be entering this market), "stored in your iPhone Health app" (just one option), "iCloud" (Apple only, though presumed for iOS). So it more or less sounds like...
 I agree that this is may just be the beginning of whole sets of entirely new classes of monitoring sensors.  As they get smaller and cheaper and more capable it's very likely that they will be used for many purposes we haven't even thought of yet.  As horrible (overall) as some of what you're talking about sounds to me personally (subnormal [you meant subdermal, right] and swallow-me monitors [some exist now]), I do think some people will be all over that. I think most of...
Carrier rootkits are worrisome indeed. I don't expect that there is any kind of systematic corporate exploitation of that with regards to CC processing, but every corporation is comprised of individuals, and humans are imperfect. Anything exploitable will eventually be exploited. Databases which were presumed to be secure are broken into every day. Just like personal information in other people's control will eventually be misused or exposed. It's just a matter of...
If your device has been rootkit'd, then all bets are off. Nothing is secure. To take advantage of such privileges can require very smart developers, time and dedication, but where money is at stake, those kinds of people exist, especially in overseas markets.Third party rootkits on any kind of credit card processing devices is bad news. Let's imagine for a moment that somehow the actual data swiped from the card and sent to the CC authorizer is secure from a rootkit. I...
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