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Posts by Blah64

  Big difference though.  When I go into a coffee shop and use their WiFi, I'm "paying" for it by ordering food or drink.  That is the expectation, and in some places there are even posted requests or enforced limits in place that make you order something every 2 hours to continue using their WiFi.  There is NO expectation that they are gathering personal information about me (I sure as hell don't use #$!@! loyalty cards!).  When Google is running their network, those...
  So once again your "argument", if you can call it that, is that other companies do it too, so it must be okay.  But that's wrong.  Other companies do it too, and it's just as bad.  The big difference is that they're not as good at it, and no one has fingers that go nearly as deep in as many places.  Facebook and Apple have deep reach in certain pockets, if you use their services, but they are much easier to avoid.  Think about it, Apple doesn't have hosted code sitting...
      I certainly don't feel fine with the latter, but the reason it feels so dirty with Google is because they are literally everywhere.  They have their fingers in more of most peoples' orifices than even their users understand.  With your ISP, at least they're only listening to everything on your home connection.  Unless you take very active measures, Google is listening to you at home, on your mobile, at work, at the coffee shop, and soon at the parks and anywhere...
  "Ads aren't evil"   Let's talk about this for a minute, because it gets to the crux of the matter.   Ads by themselves are not evil.  And even contextual ads are not evil.  Contextual ads have been used for at least 50 years on television, radio, magazines, newspapers, etc.  It only makes sense to advertise toys during a kids show, and pickup trucks during football games.  But NONE OF THIS REQUIRES ANY STORED KNOWLEDGE ABOUT INDIVIDUALS.  [i]That[/i] is the difference....
  I'd like to think it was that simple, but the truth is, just having all this data in massive online storehouses makes it nearly impossible to be 100% secure.  Software is complex, and there are many layers for bugs to creep in.   Not that I'm opposed to imposing huge fines, I think that would help.  It's just not going to solve the problem entirely.  Mostly, the problem is social.  People think it's okay to send OTHER people's information around on the internet, and...
  YES!  This is the problem with today's careless society.  It wasn't long ago when you would never have to be concerned with your friends giving your personal information to various corporations, because they would just never dream of it.  Now it's the ugly norm.  People are only concerned with their convenience, and you have to constantly remind people if you don't want to be in some third-pary corporate storehouse of personal data, and even still, some people can't get...
  If you're really on a school board, I hope you think twice about this and educate your fellow board members about the risks of kids under the age of 13 hosting their documents on public servers.  First, kids under the age of 13 are legally restricted from using a lot of online services.  I haven't delved into iCloud ToS, but kids cannot use Google Docs and similar services for good reason.   I would highly recommend talking with your district's legal team about whether...
  +1 for working offline.   I can't understand why people would put any documents that aren't completely public "in the cloud", ever.   I understand the appeal, but there are a lot of things that sound cool and shiny until you dig under the hood and think about long-term effects.  Like Google services, ugh.   It's fine that Apple creates additional productivity tools for different markets and usage scenarios, but apparently they are doing so at the expense of the current...
  I hope you encouraged here AWAY from Teach For America, toward some of the education measures that actually exist to help kids, not adults.   It has been incredibly disappointing to see such an influential person fall victim to thinking that this organization is still good.  They started out many years ago with a real desire (I believe) to help kids in need, but they have grown into a monster that only serves as a stepping stone for young, well-off adults, on their way...
  If you think simply creating an account under a false name doesn't give Facebook lots of information about you, then you are sadly selling them short.  Unless you use extreme (tinfoil level, which isn't always a bad thing) care and diligence, Facebook, Google and other personal profile-generating sites can make very good guesses about who you are, no matter what fake FB name you use.   Think about it.  Do you have any "real" friends on this fake account?  Your social...
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