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Posts by Blah64

 I guess I disagree.  Wearable tech is going to have strong ties with fitness and health, as we have been reading about in recent months.  Apple is heading in this direction, make no mistake.  Look at the headlines today about Apple requiring sources for medical information in iOS Apps.  They are clearly paying attention to healthcare.
 It might seem that way to intelligent people, but frankly, most people just don't think through the consequences of their actions enough to care. In today's world, convenience trumps common sense.  Like Bregalad says, most people don't seem to care (or don't understand) that almost all of their electronic communications and transactions are being recorded, monitored, analyzed and stored for future uses that are yet to be determined. Features like this are certainly...
 Two questions: 1) Has this been confirmed either way?  Anyone? I'd love to drop those apps on my current iPhone if they're available for free. 2) How much of the functionality of the latest versions of these apps is restricted if you don't use iCloud.  I have no interest in ever storing any kind of personal data in the cloud, but would appreciate the ability to use and edit spreadsheets and presentations created on my Mac and also editing photos directly on the iPhone...
 I agree that cases severely diminish from the fit and feel of a beautiful device like the iPhone.  It's like putting a cheap plastic cover on your fancy leather couch.  Sure, it protects it, but at what cost?  You never get to enjoy the device that designers put thousands of hours into honing.  Steve Jobs had it right, but if people want to buy them I guess I'm okay with that because it means more money for shareholders. As for people dropping phones, I don't know what to...
  Fantastic article, thanks very much for posting.  Everyone in tech should read this.  I did a quick search for trial results, and it doesn't look like it went well for the Bakers, but what I saw didn't really have any details, nor any information about appeals.   For me, the key is that you never trust any one source.  Not only with "internet research", but investment advice, M&A, whatever.
  Big difference though.  When I go into a coffee shop and use their WiFi, I'm "paying" for it by ordering food or drink.  That is the expectation, and in some places there are even posted requests or enforced limits in place that make you order something every 2 hours to continue using their WiFi.  There is NO expectation that they are gathering personal information about me (I sure as hell don't use #$!@! loyalty cards!).  When Google is running their network, those...
  So once again your "argument", if you can call it that, is that other companies do it too, so it must be okay.  But that's wrong.  Other companies do it too, and it's just as bad.  The big difference is that they're not as good at it, and no one has fingers that go nearly as deep in as many places.  Facebook and Apple have deep reach in certain pockets, if you use their services, but they are much easier to avoid.  Think about it, Apple doesn't have hosted code sitting...
      I certainly don't feel fine with the latter, but the reason it feels so dirty with Google is because they are literally everywhere.  They have their fingers in more of most peoples' orifices than even their users understand.  With your ISP, at least they're only listening to everything on your home connection.  Unless you take very active measures, Google is listening to you at home, on your mobile, at work, at the coffee shop, and soon at the parks and anywhere...
  "Ads aren't evil"   Let's talk about this for a minute, because it gets to the crux of the matter.   Ads by themselves are not evil.  And even contextual ads are not evil.  Contextual ads have been used for at least 50 years on television, radio, magazines, newspapers, etc.  It only makes sense to advertise toys during a kids show, and pickup trucks during football games.  But NONE OF THIS REQUIRES ANY STORED KNOWLEDGE ABOUT INDIVIDUALS.  [i]That[/i] is the difference....
  I'd like to think it was that simple, but the truth is, just having all this data in massive online storehouses makes it nearly impossible to be 100% secure.  Software is complex, and there are many layers for bugs to creep in.   Not that I'm opposed to imposing huge fines, I think that would help.  It's just not going to solve the problem entirely.  Mostly, the problem is social.  People think it's okay to send OTHER people's information around on the internet, and...
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